View More View Less
  • 1 Eötvös University Budapest Please ask the editor of the journal.
  • | 2 Eötvös University Budapest Please ask the editor of the journal.
  • | 3 Eötvös University Budapest Please ask the editor of the journal.
  • | 4 Eötvös University Budapest Please ask the editor of the journal.
Restricted access

Here we suggest that subjects' performance in a traditional object permanence paradigm could be based on the contribution of different cognitive capacities such as (1) the ability to represent an object mentally in case of invisible displacements; (2) the ability to use appropriate deductive inferences; (3) the ability to use associative learning and local rules or cues; and (4) the presence of appropriate motivation to solve the task. In addition to these, there is another factor that may contribute to the performance, at least in some social species: (5) the ability to identify and use social rules that are formed by the interaction with the experimenter during the consecutive object hiding and search tasks. Experiment 1 was designed to demonstrate that such social rules may have an independent influence on the performance of both human and dog subjects during consecutive object hiding and search tasks. The behaviors of adult and preschool humans and adult pet dogs were compared in a modified version of the successive invisible displacements task (no object condition) and in a similar task in which, however, the location of the target object was well known by the subjects (game condition ).  During the no object condition most of the humans and dogs performed a full and systematic search of all potential hiding places. However, results in game condition indicate that Piagetian object permanence tests may be interpreted by both dogs and humans not only as object hiding and finding tasks, but, alternatively, as social-behavioral games of different sorts that may contribute to the systematic search performance. It seems that successful performance on such tasks should not be interpreted exclusively as indicating a representational understanding of object permanence and an ability for deductive inferences. A second experiment was directly designed to demonstrate the influential effect of social rules in the object hiding and finding tasks. Results show that the functional 'opacity' of the Hider's behaviour (i.e., performing both functionally relevant and irrelevant actions upon hiding) enhanced the emergence of 'obeying social rules' (i.e., dogs tended to perform search behaviour, although they knew the location of the target object). We suggest that during their domestication dogs may have been selected for certain human-like capacities such as recognising and following social rules in the context of interacting with humans.

  • CSÁNYI, V. (2000): The `human behaviour complex' and the compulsion of communication: Key factors in human evolution. Semiotica, 128, 45-60.

    'The 'human behaviour complex' and the compulsion of communication: Key factors in human evolution ' () 128 Semiotica : 45 -60.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • DE WAAL, F. B. M. (1991): The chimpanzee's sense of social regularity and its relation to the human sense of justice. American Behavioral Scientist, 34, 335-349.

    'The chimpanzee's sense of social regularity and its relation to the human sense of justice ' () 34 American Behavioral Scientist : 335 -349.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • COLLIER-BAKER, E., DAVIS, J. M. and SUDDENDORF, T. (2004): Do dogs (Canis familiaris) understand invisible displacement? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118, 421-433.

    'Do dogs (Canis familiaris) understand invisible displacement? ' () 118 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 421 -433.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • DE WAAL, F. B. M. (1996): Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals , ().

  • FLACK, J. C. and DE WAAL, F. B. M. (2000a): "Any animal whatever": Darwinian building blocks of morality in monkeys and apes (includes commentaries). Journal of Consciousness Studies, 7, 1-65.

    '"Any animal whatever": Darwinian building blocks of morality in monkeys and apes (includes commentaries) ' () 7 Journal of Consciousness Studies : 1 -65.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • FLACK, J. C. and DE WAAL, F. B. M. (2000b): Being nice is not a building block of morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 7, 1-65.

    'Being nice is not a building block of morality ' () 7 Journal of Consciousness Studies : 1 -65.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • FLACK, J. C., JEANNOTTE, L. A. and DE WAAL, F. B. M. (2005): Play signaling and the perception of social rules by juvenile chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118, 149-159.

    'Play signaling and the perception of social rules by juvenile chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) ' () 118 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 149 -159.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • GAGNON, S. and DORÉ, F. (1992): Search behavior in various breeds of adult dogs (Canis familiaris): Object permanence and olfactory cues, Journal of Comparative Psychology, 106, 58-68.

    'Search behavior in various breeds of adult dogs (Canis familiaris): Object permanence and olfactory cues ' () 106 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 58 -68.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • WOOD, S., MORIARTY, K. M., GARDNER, B. T. and GARDNER, R. A. (1980): Object permanence in child and chimpanzee. Animal Learning and Behavior, 8, 3-9.

    'Object permanence in child and chimpanzee ' () 8 Animal Learning and Behavior : 3 -9.

  • PASNAK, R., KURKJIAN, M. and TRIANA, E. (1988): Assessment of Stage 6 object permanence. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 26, 4, 368-370.

    'Assessment of Stage 6 object permanence ' () 26 Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society : 368 -370.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • PAXTON, D. W. (2000): A case for a naturalistic perspective. Anthrozoös, 13, 5-8.

    'A case for a naturalistic perspective ' () 13 Anthrozoös : 5 -8.

  • PIAGET, J. (1937): La construction du réel chez l'enfant. (The construction of reality in the child.) Neuchatel, Switzerland.

    La construction du réel chez l'enfant , ().

  • PONGRÁCZ, P., MIKLÓSI, Á., KUBINYI, E., GUROBI, K., TOPÁL, J. and CSÁNYI, V. (2001): Social learning in dogs: the effect of a human demonstrator on the performance of dogs in a detour task. Animal Behaviour, 62, 1109-1117.

    'Social learning in dogs: the effect of a human demonstrator on the performance of dogs in a detour task ' () 62 Animal Behaviour : 1109 -1117.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • PONGRÁCZ, P., MIKLÓSI, Á., KUBINYI, E., TOPÁL, J. and CSÁNYI, V. (2003): Interaction between individual experience and social learning in dogs. Animal Behaviour, 65, 595-603.

    'Interaction between individual experience and social learning in dogs ' () 65 Animal Behaviour : 595 -603.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • SCHLEIDT, W. M. (1998): Is humaneness canine? Human Ethology Bulletin, 13, 1-4.

    'Is humaneness canine? ' () 13 Human Ethology Bulletin : 1 -4.

  • SIGG, H. and FALETT, J. (1985): Experiments on the respect of possession and property in hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas). Animal Behaviour, 33, 978-984.

    'Experiments on the respect of possession and property in hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) ' () 33 Animal Behaviour : 978 -984.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • TOMASELLO, M. and CALL, J. (1997): Primate Cognition. Oxford University Press.

    Primate Cognition , ().

  • TRIANA, E. and PASNAK, R. (1981): Object permanence in cats and dogs. Animal Learning and Behavior, 9, 135-139.

    'Object permanence in cats and dogs ' () 9 Animal Learning and Behavior : 135 -139.

  • TOPÁL, J., GÁCSI. M., MIKLÓSI, Á., VIRÁNYI, ZS., KUBINYI, E., CSÁNYI, V. (2005): Attachment to humans: a comparative study on hand-reared wolves and differently socialized dog puppies. Animal Behaviour, in press.

    'Attachment to humans: a comparative study on hand-reared wolves and differently socialized dog puppies ' () Animal Behaviour .

    • Search Google Scholar
  • WATSON, J. S., GERGELY, GY., CSÁNYI, V., TOPÁL., GÁCSI, M. and SÁRKÖZI, ZS. (2001): Distinguishing logic from association in the solution of an invisible displacement task by children (Homo sapiens) and dogs (Canis familiaris): Using negotion of disjunction. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 115, 219-226.

    'Distinguishing logic from association in the solution of an invisible displacement task by children (Homo sapiens) and dogs (Canis familiaris): Using negotion of disjunction ' () 115 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 219 -226.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • GAGNON, S. and DORÉ, F. (1993): Search behavior of dogs (Canis familiaris) in invisible displacement problems. Animal Learning and Behavior, 21, 246-254.

    'Search behavior of dogs (Canis familiaris) in invisible displacement problems ' () 21 Animal Learning and Behavior : 246 -254.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • GAGNON, S. and DORÉ, F. (1994): A cross-sectional analysis of object permanence development in dogs (Canis familiaris). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 108, 220-232.

    'A cross-sectional analysis of object permanence development in dogs (Canis familiaris) ' () 108 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 220 -232.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • GÓMEZ, J.-C. (2005): Species comparative studies and cognitive development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9, 118-125.

    'Species comparative studies and cognitive development ' () 9 Trends in Cognitive Sciences : 118 -125.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • KUBINYI, E., MIKLÓSI, Á., TOPÁL, J. and CSÁNYI, V. (2003a): Allelomimetic behaviour and social anticipation in dogs: preliminary results. Animal Cognition, 6, 57-63.

    'Allelomimetic behaviour and social anticipation in dogs: preliminary results ' () 6 Animal Cognition : 57 -63.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • KUMMER, H. and CORDS, M. (1991): Cues of ownership in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Animal Behaviour, 42, 529-549.

    'Cues of ownership in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) ' () 42 Animal Behaviour : 529 -549.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • MIKLÓSI Á., TOPÁL J. and CSÁNYI V. (2004): Comparative social cognition: What can dogs teach us? Animal Behaviour, 67, 995-1004.

    'Comparative social cognition: What can dogs teach us? ' () 67 Animal Behaviour : 995 -1004.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • KUBINYI, E., TOPÁL, J., MIKLÓSI, Á. and CSÁNYI, V. (2003b): Dogs learn from their owner via observation in a manipulation task. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 117, 156-165.

    'Dogs learn from their owner via observation in a manipulation task ' () 117 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 156 -165.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • NATALE, F., ANTINUCCI, F., SPINOZZI, G. and POTI, P. (1986): Stage 6 object concept in nonhuman primate cognition: A comparison between gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) and Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 100, 335-339.

    'Stage 6 object concept in nonhuman primate cognition: A comparison between gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) and Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) ' () 100 Journal of Comparative Psychology : 335 -339.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • UZGIRIS, I., C. and HUNT, J. (1975): Assessment in Infancy: Ordinal Scales of Psychological Development. Champaign: University of Illinois Press.

    Assessment in Infancy: Ordinal Scales of Psychological Development , ().

Journal of Cultural and Evolutionary Psychology
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
2003
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1589-5254 (Print)
ISSN 1589-7397 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Jun 2021 3 0 0
Jul 2021 4 2 2
Aug 2021 7 0 0
Sep 2021 7 0 0
Oct 2021 6 0 0
Nov 2021 10 1 1
Dec 2021 0 0 0