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M.Y. Guida Organic Chemistry and Analytical Laboratory (LCOA), Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco

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S.E. Lanaya Organic Chemistry and Analytical Laboratory (LCOA), Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco

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F.E. Laghchioua Organic Chemistry and Analytical Laboratory (LCOA), Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco

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Z. Rbihi Organic Chemistry and Analytical Laboratory (LCOA), Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco

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A. Hannioui Organic Chemistry and Analytical Laboratory (LCOA), Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco
Department of Chemistry and Environment, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FST), University of Sultan Moulay Slimane (USMS), 23000 Béni-Mellal, Morocco

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Abstract

This study deals with fast pyrolysis of sawdust wood waste (SWW) at the range of temperature 300–700 °C in a stainless steel tubular reactor. The aim was to experimentally investigate how the temperature, the particle size, the nitrogen flow rate (N2) and the heating rate affect bio-oil, bio-char and gaseous products. These parameters were varied in the ranges of 5–20 °C/min, below 0.1–1.5 mm and 20–200 mL min−1, respectively. It was concluded that both the temperature and heating rate have a significant effect on both yield of bio-oil and bio-char resulting from pyrolysis of SWW. The liquid products obtained at various pyrolysis temperatures were subjected into column chromatography after removal of asphaltenes (hexane insoluble). Obtained bio-oils (maltenes or hexane soluble) were classified as aliphatic, aromatic and polar sub-fractions. The maximum of bio-oil yield of 39.5 wt% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, particle size between 0.5 and 1 mm, nitrogen flow rate (N2) of 100 mL min−1 and heating rate of 5 °C/min. Liquid product (bio-oil) obtained under the most suitable and optimal condition was characterized by elemental analysis, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR and 13C NMR), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The analysis of liquid showed that bio-oil from SWW could be a potential source of renewable fuel production and value added chemical. The yield of char generally decreases with increasing the temperature, the char yield passes from 54.61 to 29.47 wt% at the heating rate of 5 °C/min and from 50.01 to 24.5 wt% at the heating rate of 20 °C/min at the same range of temperature (300–700 °C). Solid products (bio-char) obtained in the presence of nitrogen (N2) contain a very important percentage of carbon and high heating values (HHVs).

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Felföldi, József

Chair of the Editorial Board Szendrő, Péter

Editorial Board

  • Beke, János (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineerin, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Fenyvesi, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Szendrő, Péter (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Felföldi, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Food Science, Budapest – Hungary)

 

Advisory Board

  • De Baerdemaeker, Josse (KU Leuven, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Leuven - Belgium)
  • Funk, David B. (United States Department of Agriculture | USDA • Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), Kansas City – USA
  • Geyer, Martin (Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Horticultural Engineering, Potsdam - Germany)
  • Janik, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Kutzbach, Heinz D. (Institut für Agrartechnik, Fg. Grundlagen der Agrartechnik, Universität Hohenheim – Germany)
  • Mizrach, Amos (Institute of Agricultural Engineering. ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan – Israel)
  • Neményi, Miklós (Széchenyi University, Department of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Győr – Hungary)
  • Schulze-Lammers, Peter (University of Bonn, Institute of Agricultural Engineering (ILT), Bonn – Germany)
  • Sitkei, György (University of Sopron, Institute of Wood Engineering, Sopron – Hungary)
  • Sun, Da-Wen (University College Dublin, School of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Agriculture and Food Science, Dublin – Ireland)
  • Tóth, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)

Prof. Felföldi, József
Institute: MATE - Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Department of Measurements and Process Control
Address: 1118 Budapest Somlói út 14-16
E-mail: felfoldi.jozsef@uni-mate.hu

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2022  
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H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.191
Scimago Quartile Score

Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial Manufacturing Engineering (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1.1
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Agricultural and Biological Sciences 141/213 (34th PCTL)
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104/147 (29th PCTL)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/355 (26th PCTL)
Mechanical Engineering 494/631 (21st PCTL)
Environmental Engineering 145/184 (21st PCTL)
 
Scopus
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0.222

2021  
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8
Scimago
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0,141
Scimago Quartile Score Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/338 (Q4)
Environmental Engineering 138/173 (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering 495/601 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,381

2020  
Scimago
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8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,197
Scimago
Quartile Score
Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q3
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
33/69=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Environmental Engineering 126/146 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 269/336 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 512/596 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
53
Scopus
Documents
41
Days from submission to acceptance 122
Days from acceptance to publication 40
Acceptance rate 86%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
6
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,123
Scimago
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Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q4
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
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18/33=0,5
Scopus
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Environmental Engineering 108/132 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 242/340 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 481/585 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
13
Scopus
Documents
5

 

Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
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Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Language English
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2004
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Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia  
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Address
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