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  • 1 Mobilissimus Ltd., Lónyay u. 34, H-1093, Budapest, Hungary
  • | 2 Department of Highway and Railway Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Műegyetem rkp. 3, H-1111, Budapest, Hungary
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Abstract

The congested traffic flow is significantly different from both the free flow and the non-congested but limited flow. Two of those differences are in the merging and crossing movements. Based on the conducted measurements, this movement could be up to 10 times faster in the congested condition. Another important feature is the giveway gestures. It was found that the vast majority of the gaps needed to merge or cross are not generated by the traffic dynamic, but created by the arterial road's drivers in the interactions with drivers wishing to merge or cross.

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