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Abstract

The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between undergraduate students' admission practices and their academic performance. The participants of this study were 233 undergraduate students who were in their first and third-year studies as well as two Madda Walabu University Professors. A mixed Research method was employed to analyze the data collected through Questionnaires, Interviews, and Documents. T-tests and correlation coefficients were performed to see the differences between students' academic performance and their admission practices. The result of this study revealed that there is a significant positive relationship between the students' admission practice and their academic performances at this University. This study determined that one of the factors impeding students' learning and academic performance at Madda Walabu University was the admission practice employed at this University to enroll students into different academic Programs. Therefore, this study expands the understanding that admission practices are among the factors influencing students' academic performances.

Open access
Hungarian Educational Research Journal
Authors:
Werede Tareke Gebregergis
,
Furtuna Beraki
,
Mulubrhan Michael
,
Munira Ahmedin
,
Nahom Debesay
,
Tsega Atoshm
,
Wizdan Tekleberhan
,
Karolina Eszter Kovacs
, and
Csilla Csukonyi

Abstract

The study sought to explore the levels of emotional intelligence and academic engagement among college students, which has not been extensively represented in the existing literature within the Eritrean higher educational context. The study comprised a sample of 119 senior Asmara College of Education students selected through the convenience sampling strategy. The Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test and Student Engagement Scale were employed to assess the levels of emotional intelligence and student engagement of the participants. Frequency distribution, Pearson-moment correlation, and independent sample t-tests were conducted for data analysis. A significance level of 0.05 was selected to determine statistical significance when testing the relationships of emotional intelligence and engagement with demographic variables. The findings of the study revealed that most students exhibited moderate to high levels of emotional intelligence and academic engagement. The independent sample t-tests indicated that female students tended to have higher levels of emotional intelligence and also reported higher behavioral engagement compared to male students. Regarding the program of study, students from the Department of Psychology and Educational Administration showed higher levels of emotional intelligence than Science education students. Conversely, Science Education students displayed greater cognitive engagement compared to those in Psychology and Educational Administration. Age was found to have a significant association with academic engagement, with older students demonstrating higher levels compared to younger students. However, the Pearson product-moment results demonstrated that significant emotional intelligence scores did not significantly differ across different age groups. The findings are expected to offer significant insights into student engagement and emotional intelligence within the context of higher education. Moreover, this study can offer practical guidance for college communities on fostering students' levels of engagement in learning and emotional skills.

Open access

Abstract

Project-based learning (PJBL) emerges as an instructional teaching method promoting collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills among students. This pedagogical approach facilitates active engagement by forming student groups to collaboratively create and develop projects, thus, encouraging the exploration of diverse perspectives and ideas within the classroom. The PJBL approach departs from traditional learning methods and offers students opportunities for enjoyment, active participation, self-expression, and creativity. PJBL instills valuable teamwork skills from a young age by equipping students with essential resources for their future endeavors through immersive experiences. This article focuses on Hungarian teachers' perspectives on PJBL by employing a qualitative approach. The study conducts semi-structured interviews with nine educators to unravel their insights on the advantages and challenges of implementing PJBL in the classroom. The paper explores the nuanced views of Hungarian teachers and aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of how PJBL is perceived in the educational landscape. The findings contribute valuable insights to the broader discourse on project-based learning displaying a context-specific lens on the perceptions of educators in Hungary and enriching the understanding of PJBL's dynamics within the educational settings.

Open access

Abstract

We have seen the tremendous development of new technologies, especially in the field of electronic communications. As they are present in our daily lives, it is expected that the new technical possibilities will be used in the courts.

In Poland, the digital transformation of civil procedure began with the implementation of electronic writ proceedings. Among the electronic tools which support the trials, there is a possibility of hearing the parties and witnesses using videoconferencing, and the Electronic Case Management System, which allows authorized entities to get access to the information on the pending case.

The procedural rules are fluctuating and depend on the changes taking place in the economic and social structure. It can be assumed that as circumstances change, the rules may, and even should, be reinterpreted, and the legislator should strive to change the procedural provisions so that they will be consistent with the objectives and guidelines resulting from the procedural principles.

The analysis of the issues related to the digitization of civil cases, as an issue of paramount importance, allows us to assume that digitization does not entail modifying the model and its basic principles. The digital transformation of the civil trial emerges within the framework resulting from the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, as none of the procedural principles is violated. It can even be assumed that digitalisation allows for a more complete implementation of procedural principles.

In fact, this can also be an argument in favour of introducing modern technological tools to procedural regulations.

Full access

Abstract

During the 2010s, technological development created the opportunity to hold online hearings, when the parties are physically distant from each other, when their personal appearance would entail significant threat to them, or when external circumstances would impose additional barriers for interested stakeholders to appear in the courtroom. As a consequence, amongst others, the Belgian Constitutional Court heard a case concerning the constitutionality of such trials, and rejected this new form of judicial operation due to numerous constitutional concerns. Nevertheless, the context of such controversies changed significantly during the pandemic, and in the light of the public health risks several judicial bodies decided to continue most of their operations through digital means. As a result, the holding of numerous online trials was ordered. Obviously, losing parties often submitted remedies against the incorporation of these platforms into judicial work by claiming the violation of their right to fair trial. For instance, the French Constitutional Council, the Spanish Constitutional Tribunal, as well as the Supreme Courts of Austria, Norway, Costa Rica and India assessed the constitutionality of these trials during the public health emergency, and in most of the cases, the application of online hearings was upheld. Bearing in mind this tendency in the relevant case law, one should argue that the rapidly evolving technological landscape requires the reconsideration of our attitudes towards online hearings: it should be clarified which grounds are acceptable justifications for ordering online trials during ordinary periods, and how the analysis is affected by unforeseen extra-ordinary circumstances. Online, or partly online proceedings may provide greater flexibility for both the court and the parties, and could also support the efficiency of judicial work, however, the main fair trial safeguards should be maintained. Our contribution will conceptualize this issue, and will provide a deeper understanding of the constitutional implications of remote trials.

Open access