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Blue-green algae (also called cyanobacteria) are ubiquitous, pristine and pioneer photosynthetic microorganisms. Many species of cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen and such species in wet soils are simultaneously augmenting the fertility of the soil, acting as natural bio-fertilizers. Nostoc and Anabaena are the two important genera of heterocystous cyanobacteria capable of contributing nitrogen to soil, especially in paddy fields. The major objectives of the investigation included survey, collection, isolation and pure culture of nitrogen-fixing species of Cyanobacteria in the soils of Kerala state, India. Altogether, pure cultures of 12 species of Nostoc and 5 species of Anabaena are prepared.

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The identification of the diversity of microscopic fungi of lithobiont communities of the Argentine Islands in specimens collected during the 22nd Ukrainian Antarctic Expedition was the purpose of this work. Samples of rock, soil, mosses and lichens of rock micro-habitats of “Crustose lichen sub-formation and fruticose lichen and moss cushion sub-formation” were used in the work. These samples were used for extracting and cultivation of filamentous fungi on dense nutrient media. Determination of physiological and biochemical characteristics and identification of yeast-like fungi were performed using a microbiological analyser ‘Vitek-2’ (‘Bio Merieux’, France). Cultivation of microorganisms was carried out at temperatures from +2 to +37 °C. In results cultures of microscopic fungi of Zygomycota (Mucor circinelloides), Ascomycota (species of the genera cf. Tlielebolus, Talaromyces), representatives of the Anamorphic fungi group (Geomyces pannorum, species of the genera Alternaria, Acremonium, Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Cladosporium) were isolated from Antarctic samples. Microscopic fungi Penicillium spp. were dominated after the frequency in the studied samples (54.5%). Rhodotorula rubra and Candida sp. among isolated yeast fungi, and dark pigmented fungi represented by Aureobasidium pulhdans and Exophiala spp. were identified. The biological properties of a number of isolated fungi (the potential ability to synthesise important biologically active substances: melanins, carotenoids, lipids) are characterised. Mycobiota of rock communities of Argentine Islands is rich on filamentous and yeast fungi similarly to other regions of Antarctica. A number of fungi investigated are potentially able to synthesise biologically active substances. The dark pigmented species of the genera Cladosporium, Exophiala, Aureobasidium pulhdans, capable of melanin synthesis; ‘red’ yeast Rhodotorula rubra (carotenoid producers and resistant to toxic metals); Mucor circinelloides and Geomyces pannorum, lipid producers, are among these fungi. Yeast-like fungi assimilated a wide range of carbohydrates, which will allow them to be further used for cultivation in laboratory and process conditions. The collection of technologically promising strains of microorganisms, part of the Culture Collection of Fungi at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv (Ukraine), is updated with isolated species (strains) of filamentous fungi and yeast – potential producers of biologically active substances, obtained within this study.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: S. Y. Kondratyuk, D. K. Upreti, G. K. Mishra, S. Nayaka, K. K. Ingle, O. O. Orlov, A. S. Kondratiuk, L. Lőkös, E. Farkas, J.-J. Woo and J.-S. Hur

Eight species, new for science, i.e.: Lobothallia gangwondoana S. Y. Kondr., J.-J. Woo et J.-S. Hur and Phyllopsora dodongensis S. Y. Kondr. et J.-S. Hur from South Korea, Eastern Asia, Ioplaca rinodinoides S. Y. Kondr., K. K. Ingle, D. K. Upreti et S. Nayaka, Letrouitia assamana S. Y. Kondr., G. K. Mishra et D. K. Upreti, and Rusavskia indochinensis S. Y. Kondr., D. K. Upreti et S. Nayaka from India and China, South Asia, Caloplaca orloviana S. Y. Kondr. and Rusavskia drevlyanica S. Y. Kondr. et O. O. Orlov from Ukraine, Eastern Europe, as well as Xanthoria ibizaensis S. Y. Kondr. et A. S. Kondr. from Ibiza Island, Spain, Mediterranean Europe, are described, illustrated and compared with closely related taxa.

Fominiella tenerifensis S. Y. Kondr., Kärnefelt, A. Thell et Feuerer is for the first time recorded from Mediterranean Europe, Huriella loekoesiana S. Y. Kondr. et Upreti is provided from Russia for the first time, and H. pohangensis S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös et J.-S. Hur for the first time from China, Phoma candelariellae Z. Kocakaya et Halıcı is new to Ukraine, and Staurothele frustulenta Vain. is recorded from the Forest Zone of Ukraine for the first time.

Twelve new combinations, i.e.: Bryostigma apotheciorum (for Sphaeria apotheciorum A. Massal.), Bryostigma biatoricola (for Arthonia biatoricola Ihlen et Owe-Larss.), Bryostigma dokdoense (for Arthonia dokdoensis S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös, B. G. Lee, J.-J. Woo et J.-S. Hur), Bryostigma epiphyscium (for Arthonia epiphyscia Nyl.), Bryostigma lobariellae (for Arthonia lobariellae Etayo), Bryostigma lapidicola (for Lecidea lapidicola Taylor), Bryostigma molendoi (for Tichothecium molendoi Heufl. ex Arnold), Bryostigma neglectulum (for Arthonia neglectula Nyl.), Bryostigma parietinarium (for Arthonia parietinaria Hafellner et Fleischhacker), Bryostigma peltigerinum (for Arthonia vagans var. peltigerina Almq.), Bryostigma phaeophysciae (for Arthonia phaeophysciae Grube et Matzer), Bryostigma stereocaulinum (for Arthonia nephromiaria var. stereocaulina Ohlert), are proposed based on results of combined phylogenetic analysis based on mtSSU and RPB2 gene sequences.

Thirty-one new combinations for members of the genus Polyozosia (i.e.: Polyozosia actophila (for Lecanora actophila Wedd.), Polyozosia agardhiana (for Lecanora agardhiana Ach.), Polyozosia altunica (for Myriolecis altunica R. Mamut et A. Abbas), Polyozosia antiqua (for Lecanora antiqua J. R. Laundon), Polyozosia bandolensis (for Lecanora bandolensis B. de Lesd.), Polyozosia behringii (for Lecanora behringii Nyl.), Polyozosia caesioalutacea (for Lecanora caesioalutacea H. Magn.), Polyozosia carlottiana (for Lecanora carlottiana C. J. Lewis et Śliwa), Polyozosia congesta (for Lecanora congesta Clauzade et Vězda), Polyozosia eurycarpa (for Lecanora eurycarpa Poelt, Leuckert et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia expectans (Lecanora expectans Darb.), Polyozosia flowersiana (Lecanora flowersiana H. Magn.), Polyozosia fugiens (for Lecanora fugiens Nyl.), Polyozosia invadens (for Lecanora invadens H. Magn.), Polyozosia juniperina (for Lecanora juniperina Śliwa), Polyozosia latzelii (for Lecanora latzelii Zahlbr.), Polyozosia liguriensis (for Lecanora liguriensis B. de Lesd.), Polyozosia massei (for Myriolecis massei M. Bertrand et J.-Y. Monnat), Polyozosia mons-nivis (for Lecanora mons-nivis Darb.), Polyozosia oyensis (for Lecanora oyensis M.-P. Bertrand et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia percrenata (for Lecanora percrenata H. Magn.), Polyozosia persimilis (for Lecanora hagenii subsp. persimilis Th. Fr.), Polyozosia poeltiana (for Lecanora poeltiana Clauzade et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia prominens (for Lecanora prominens Clauzade et Vězda), Polyozosia prophetae-eliae (for Lecanora prophetae-eliae Sipman), Polyozosia salina (for Lecanora salina H. Magn.), Polyozosia schofieldii (for Lecanora schofieldii Brodo), Polyozosia sverdrupiana (for Lecanora sverdrupiana Øvstedal), Polyozosia torrida (for Lecanora torrida Vain.), Polyozosia wetmorei (for Lecanora wetmorei Śliwa), Polyozosia zosterae (for Lecanora subfusca? zosterae Ach.)) are proposed.

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Lichenes Delicati Exsiccati Editae of little, fine, special lichens is edited in honour of Antonín Vězda (1920–2008). The fifth fascicle of the exsiccate is consisted of 20 species of lichens and lichenicolous fungi and distributed to 12 lichen herbaria of the world. Collectors are K. Buaruang, D. Kalb, K. Kalb, G. E. Lee, L. Lőkös, A. Mertens, W. Polyiam, T. Pócs, W. Saipunkaew, D. Tang, N. Varga and E. Farkas.

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Tamarix L. (Tamaricaceae) is a halophytic shrub in different parts of Asia and North Africa. Taxonomy and species limitation of Tamarix is very complex. This genus has three sections as Tamarix, Oligadenia, and Polyadenia, which are mainly separated by petal length, the number of stamens, the shape of androecial disk and attachment of filament on the androecial disk. As there was no palynological data on pollen features of Tamarix species of Iran, in the present study 12 qualitative and quantitative pollen features were evaluated to find diagnostic ones. Pollen grains of 8 Tamarix species were collected from nature. Pollen grains were studied without any treatment. Measurements were based on at least 50 pollen grains per specimen. Light and scanning electron microscopes were used. Multivariate statistical methods were applied to clarify the species relationships based on pollen data. All species studied showed monad and tricolpate (except some individuals of T. androssowii). Some Tamarix species show a high level of variability, in response to ecological niches and phenotypic plasticity, which make Tamarix species separation much more difficult. Based on the results of the present study, pollen grains features are not in agreement with previous morphological and molecular genetics about the sectional distinction.

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Between the years 2015–2018, 147 stands of Ficus carica L. was found out of cultivation in Baranya county. In 2008 presence of fig wasp (Blastophaga psenes L.) and caprificus individuals that are necessary for pollination, then for producing fertile seeds were detected in Pécs at first time. For germination tests fig seeds were collected from several different stands in Pécs and successful reproduction of the species was confirmed under in vitro conditions. According to former and recent observations (i.e. subspontaneous seedlings and/or successful in vitro germination of common fig seeds in 2010 and 2014) fig wasp may have occurred in Budapest and Máriagyűd too, at least in the last ten years. These results confirm that F. carica is an old ‘new’ casual or may be a naturalised neophyte element of the Hungarian flora. According to the new records the northernmost escaped individuals of F. carica was found at 47.475° N in the Carpathian Basin, 116.5 km N of the closest Slovenian stand in the latitudinal direction.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: S. Y. Kondratyuk, L. Lőkös, E. Farkas, I. Kärnefelt, A. Thell, Y. Yamamoto and J.-S. Hur

Three new for science genera, i.e.: Erichansenia S. Y. Kondr., Kärnefelt et A. Thell for the ‘Caloplaca’ epithallina group of the subfamily Xanthorioideae, as well as Lendemeriella S. Y. Kondr. for the Caloplaca reptans group, and Pisutiella S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös et E. Farkas for the Caloplaca conversa group of the subfamily Caloplacoideae of the Teloschistaceae, are described on the basis of results of the three gene phylogeny of the Teloschistaceae based on nrITS, nrLSU and mtSSU sequences.

Twenty-seven new combinations, i.e.: Erichansenia epithallina (for Caloplaca epithallina Lynge), Erichansenia cryodesertorum (for Shackletonia cryodesertorum Garrido-Ben., Søchting et Pérez-Ort.), Erichansenia sauronii (for Caloplaca sauronii Søchting et Øvstedal), Fauriea mandshuriaensis (for Caloplaca mandshuriaensis S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös et J.-S. Hur), Fauriea trassii (for Caloplaca trassii Galanina et S. Y. Kondr.), Lendemeriella borealis (for Lecanora pyracea f. borealis Vain.), Lendemeriella dakotensis (for Caloplaca dakotensis Wetmore), Lendemeriella exsecuta (for Lecanora exsecuta Nyl.), Lendemeriella lucifuga (for Caloplaca lucifuga G. Thor), Lendemeriella nivalis (for Zeora nivalis Körb.), Lendemeriella reptans (for Caloplaca reptans Lendemer et B. P. Hodk.), Lendemeriella sorocarpa (for Placodium sorocarpum Vain.), Lendemeriella tornoensis (for Caloplaca tornoensis H. Magn.), Pisutiella congrediens (for Lecanora congrediens Nyl.), Pisutiella conversa (for Callopisma conversum Kremp.), Pisutiella furax (for Caloplaca furax Egea et Llimona), Pisutiella grimmiae (for Lecanora grimmiae Nyl.), Pisutiella ivanpisutii (for Caloplaca ivanpisutii S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös et Hur), Pisutiella phaeothamnos (for Caloplaca phaeothamnos K. Kalb et J. Poelt), Pyrenodesmia aetnensis (for Caloplaca aetnensis B. de Lesd.), Pyrenodesmia albolutescens (for Lecanora albolutescens Nyl.), Pyrenodesmia aractina (for Parmelia aractina Fr.), Pyrenodesmia atroflava (for Lecidea atroflava Turner), Pyrenodesmia bicolor (for Caloplaca bicolor H. Magn.), Pyrenodesmia molariformis (for Caloplaca molariformis Frolov, Vondrák, Nadyeina et Khodos.), Pyrenodesmia neotaurica (for Caloplaca neotaurica Vondrák, Khodos., Arup et Søchting), Pyrenodesmia peliophylla (for Placodium peliophyllum Tuck.) are proposed based on results from a combined phylogenetic analysis using nrITS, nrLSU and mtSSU gene sequences.

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Biologia Futura
Authors: Zoltán Attila Köbölkuti, Klára Cseke, Attila Benke, Mátyás Báder, Attila Borovics and Róbert Németh

Introduction

Since Populus has veritable value as timber, plywood, pulp, and paper, genomic research should create the sound basis for further breeding toward desirable wood quality attributes.

Materials and methods

In this study, we addressed the need for a research methodology that initially identifies and then characterize candidate genes encoding enzymes with wood property phenotypic traits, toward the aim of developing a genomics-based breeding technology.

Results

On 23 different poplar species/hybrid samples, we successfully amplified 55 primers designed on Populus trichocarpa L. Considering the number of polymorphic sites, out of 73,206 bp, 51 SNPs and 31 indel events were found. Non-synonymous single base mutations could be detected in number of 30, 21 out of 164 sequences were the number of minimum recombination events and 41 significant pairwise comparisons between loci could be detected.

Discussion and conclusion

Our results provide a roadmap for a future association genetic study between nucleotide diversity and precise evaluation of phenotype.

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Biologia Futura
Authors: Gergely Sámuel Bartha, Gergő Tóth, Péter Horváth, Eszter Kiss, Nóra Papp and Monika Kerényi

Introduction

Several Aristolochia species were used as medicinal herb across Europe and in recent years, their antimicrobial activity has also been investigated.

Materials and methods

In this study, A. clematitis was selected to evaluate the aristolochic acids I and II (AA I and AA II) concentrations and the antimicrobial activity of methanol, hexane, butanol, and ethyl acetate extracts of the root, stem, leaf, root, and fruit. AA I and AA II contents were measured by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography–ultraviolet method.

Results

Each fraction of the plant contained AA I and AA II and the root was found to have the highest contents of AA I (1.09%) and AA II (0.7454%). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of all extracts were determined by standard microdilution method. The fruit’s extracts showed the most efficient antimicrobial effect against both methicillin sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

Conclusion

Correlation between the AA I and AA II concentrations and the antimicrobial effect was not found.

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Abstract

Ecological communities are shaped by a complex interplay between abiotic forcing, biotic regulation and demographic stochasticity. However, community dynamics modelers tend to focus on abiotic forcing overlooking biotic interactions, due to notorious challenges involved in modeling and quantifying inter-specific interactions, particularly for species-rich systems such as planktonic assemblages. Nevertheless, inclusive models with regard to the full range of plausible drivers are essential to characterizing and predicting community response to environmental changes. Here we develop a Bayesian model for identifying, from in-situ time series, the biotic, abiotic and stochastic factors underlying the dynamics of species-rich communities, focusing on the joint biomass dynamics of biologically meaningful groups. We parameterize a multivariate model of population co-variation with an explicit account for demographic stochasticity, density-dependent feedbacks, pairwise interactions, and abiotic stress mediated by changing environmental conditions and resource availability, and work out explicit formulae for partitioning the temporal variance of each group in its biotic, abiotic and stochastic components. We illustrate the methodology by analyzing the joint biomass dynamics of four major phytoplankton functional types namely, diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores and phytoflagellates at Station L4 in the Western English Channel using weekly biomass records and coincident measurements of environmental covariates describing water conditions and potentially limiting resources. Abiotic and biotic factors explain comparable amounts of temporal variance in log-biomass growth across functional types. Our results demonstrate that effective modelling of resource limitation and inter-specific interactions is critical for quantifying the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors.

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