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Factors associated with postural control in nursing home residents

Oral presentation at the 13th Conference of the Hungarian Medical Association of America – Hungary Chapter (HMAA-HC) at 30–31 August 2019, in Balatonfüred, Hungary

Developments in Health Sciences
Authors: R.L. ErdŐs, I. Jónásné Sztruhár, A. Simon and É. Kovács

Abstract

Purpose

Decline of the sensory and motor systems in older people negatively affects postural control. This increases the risk of falls, which is dangerous for older people in long-term care. Being aware of the quality of postural control and the factors affecting it among elderly people, is crucial in implementing an effective fall-prevention program. This study aimed to measure postural control and the demographic, health-related, and functional factors presumed to be correlated with it among nursing home residents. Another aim was to find valid screening tools based on these factors.

Materials and methods

Seventy one nursing home residents were included. Postural control was measured using the Berg Balance Scale. Grip strength, the 30-s chair stand test, and the Timed Up and Go test were used to measure global muscle strength, and functional mobility, respectively. The results of these functional tests were dichotomized using age-specific reference values.

Results

Postural control was significantly worse in those who did not reach the age-specific reference values in any of the three functional tests. Effect sizes were large for functional mobility and medium for muscle strength. Multimorbidity and gender had no effect on postural control in our sample.

Conclusions

Among nursing home residents, postural control is related to functional mobility and muscle strength. Thus, routine testing of these skills among elderly people is an important task of the physiotherapist.

Open access

History of cataract surgery from ancient times to today

Honorary Lecture at the 13th Conference of the Hungarian Medical Association of America – Hungary Chapter (HMAA-HC) at 30–31 August 2019, in Balatonfüred, Hungary

Developments in Health Sciences
Author: Z. Z. Nagy

Abstract

Cataract surgery is the most frequently performed ophthalmic surgery worldwide. This year approximately 32 million surgeries will be performed. The journey to modern, quick, and safe cataract surgery has been quite long. This review covers topics from ancient couching to the most modern phacoemulsification and femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. The gain in quality of life is the largest with cataract surgery compared to other implant surgeries (e.g. knee, hip replacement, etc.). Ophthalmology has made huge advancements in recent decades. New microsurgical tools and diagnostic equipment have been developed, together with new surgical methods and foldable intraocular lenses, made from biocompatible material. From monofocal lenses, through aspheric, toric, and multifocal lenses, to multifocal toric lenses, today almost all kinds of refractive error can be compensated, including presbyopia. Teamwork, precise preoperative assessment, and fine surgical technique should also be emphasized in order to achieve the best and most predictable postoperative results for both patient and surgeon.

Open access

Nutritional intake and body composition in children with inflammatory bowel disease

Oral presentation at the 13th Conference of the Hungarian Medical Association of America – Hungary Chapter (HMAA-HC) at 30–31 August 2019, in Balatonfüred, Hungary

Developments in Health Sciences
Authors: H. K. Pintér, K. K. Boros, E. Pálfi and G. Veres

Abstract

Purpose

In this study we assessed nutritional intake, body composition, and their relationship in patients with paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods

We conducted a longitudinal, prospective study of 38 patients' nutritional intake using 3-day food records (FR) and bioimpedance analysis of body composition. FR were evaluated by Nutricomp DietCAD software. Results were analysed with Microsoft Excel 2013 and IBM SPSS Statistics 22 software.

Results

Patients treated with biological and conventional therapy (CT) had a higher intake of vegetable protein and carbohydrate from starch than those treated earlier with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) in the remission phase (F = 5.926, F = 5.130, P < 0.05). The former EEN group had a higher intake of iron compared to the other two groups (F = 3.967, P = 0.036). Protein intake and fat-free mass (FFM) had a significant positive correlation, while added sugar correlated with body fat mass (BFM) in the same way (R 2 = 0.122, R 2 = 0.169, P < 0.05). Body-fat mass in patients of the biological therapy (BT) group overstepped the healthy median, and the FFM in the EEN group stayed under it.

Conclusions

Our results confirm that it is essential to monitor body composition and not only measure body weight. Patients should be advised based on their body composition, therapy, and phase of the disease.

Open access

Abstract

By now, there is no doubt that regular physical exercise has an overall beneficial effect on each organ of the body. However, the effects of highly competitive sports (HCS) are more complex, as they exert greater demands on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, among others. Strength, athletic, and aesthetic sport types each has a different exercise intensity and nutritional loading, as well as a different prevalence of cardiometabolic diseases at a later age. HCS athletes experience hypertension and mental stress during competitions and high nutritional loads between them. The post-career effects of this behaviour on the heart, arteries, cellular metabolism, and risk of obesity, are not well known and are not often the focus of research. In this review, we aimed to summarize the post-career effects of HCS. Based on data in the literature, we propose that athletes involved in highly competitive strength sports progressively develop metabolic syndrome and sustained elevated blood pressure.

Open access

Postpartum female sexual dysfunctions in Hungary: A cross-sectional study

Oral presentation at the 13th Conference of the Hungarian Medical Association of America – Hungary Chapter (HMAA-HC) at 30–31 August 2019, in Balatonfüred, Hungary

Developments in Health Sciences
Authors: K. SzÖllŐsi and L. Szabó

Abstract

Purpose

Although the prevalence of sexual dysfunction after delivery is generally considered high, this has not been well examined in Hungary. The aim of our study was to evaluate female sexual function at 3-months postpartum and to investigate some of the possible predictor factors which might influence it.

Materials and Methods

We designed a cross-sectional study using online questionnaires and recruited 253 participants. Risk factors such as infant-feeding method and urinary incontinence were assessed for a potential relationship with sexual dysfunction. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to assess sexual function. We wrote our own questions about potential predictors.

Results

48.79% of participants reported sexual dysfunction according to total FSFI score (M = 25.16, SD = 7.00). A significant relationship was found between infant-feeding method and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.003). Sexual dysfunction was more common in exclusive-breastfeeding mothers than in mixed or formula-feeding mothers. Women with urinary incontinence had significantly lower total FSFI scores (P = 0.006), and in the arousal (P = 0.033), lubrication (P = 0.022), satisfaction (P = 0.006) and pain (P = 0.032) domains compared to women with no incontinence problem.

Conclusions

Women suffering from urinary incontinence are more likely to have sexual problems, especially a higher risk of dyspareunia and a lower level of sexual interest and wetness. Exclusive breastfeeding has a negative effect on sexual function.

Open access

Abstract

A considerable number of patients arriving in dental offices are being treated with ongoing medication for a variety of chronic diseases. As a result, dentists must be familiar with the potential side effects these therapeutic agents may have on the tissues of the oral cavity, and in particular on the salivary gland. Salivary gland function may be altered by a wide range of medications, leading to effects such as xerostomia, hyposalivation, hypersalivation or even swelling of the glands. These disorders can cause a variety of other health complications. This review will focus on the most common groups of drugs responsible for salivary gland dysfunction, including psychoactive drugs, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihypertensives, and antihistamines.

Open access
Physiology International
Authors: E. Kovács, D. Pilecky, Z. Szakál-Tóth, A. Fekete-Győr, V.A. Gyarmathy, L. Gellér, B. Hauser, J. Gál, B. Merkely and E. Zima

Abstract

Aim

We investigated the effect of age on post-cardiac arrest treatment outcomes in an elderly population, based on a local database and a systemic review of the literature.

Methods

Data were collected retrospectively from medical charts and reports. Sixty-one comatose patients, cooled to 32–34 °C for 24 h, were categorized into three groups: younger group (≤65 years), older group (66–75 years), and very old group (>75 years). Circumstances of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), patients' characteristics, post-resuscitation treatment, hemodynamic monitoring, neurologic outcome and survival were compared across age groups. Kruskal-Wallis test, Chi-square test and binary logistic regression (BLR) were applied. In addition, a literature search of PubMed/Medline database was performed to provide a background.

Results

Age was significantly associated with having a cardiac arrest on a monitor and a history of hypertension. No association was found between age and survival or neurologic outcome. Age did not affect hemodynamic parameter changes during target temperature management (TTM), except mean arterial pressure (MAP). Need of catecholamine administration was the highest among very old patients. During the literature review, seven papers were identified. Most studies had a retrospective design and investigated interventions and outcome, but lacked unified age categorization. All studies reported worse survival in the elderly, although old survivors showed a favorable neurologic outcome in most of the cases.

Conclusion

There is no evidence to support the limitation of post-cardiac arrest therapy in the aging population. Furthermore, additional prospective studies are needed to investigate the characteristics and outcome of post-cardiac arrest therapy in this patient group.

Open access
Physiology International
Authors: Zs. Sári, T. Kovács, T. Csonka, M. Török, É. Sebő, J. Toth, D. Tóth, E. Mikó, B. Kiss, D. Szeőcs, K. Uray, Zs. Karányi, I. Kovács, G. Méhes, P. Árkosy and P. Bai

Abstract

Breast cancer is characterized by oncobiosis, the abnormal composition of the microbiome in neoplastic diseases. The biosynthetic capacity of the oncobiotic flora in breast cancer is suppressed, as suggested by metagenomic studies. The microbiome synthesizes a set of cytostatic and antimetastatic metabolites that are downregulated in breast cancer, including cadaverine, a microbiome metabolite with cytostatic properties. We set out to assess how the protein expression of constitutive lysine decarboxylase (LdcC), a key enzyme for cadaverine production, changes in the feces of human breast cancer patients (n = 35). We found that the fecal expression of Escherichia coli LdcC is downregulated in lobular cases as compared to invasive carcinoma of no special type (NST) cases. Lobular breast carcinoma is characterized by low or absent expression of E-cadherin. Fecal E. coli LdcC protein expression is downregulated in E-cadherin negative breast cancer cases as compared to positive ones. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of LdcC expression in lobular and NST cases revealed that fecal E. coli LdcC protein expression might have predictive values. These data suggest that the oncobiotic transformation of the microbiome indeed leads to the downregulation of the production of cytostatic and antimetastatic metabolites. In E-cadherin negative lobular carcinoma that has a higher potential for metastasis formation, the protein levels of enzymes producing antimetastatic metabolites are downregulated. This finding represents a new route that renders lobular cases permissive for metastasis formation. Furthermore, our findings underline the role of oncobiosis in regulating metastasis formation in breast cancer.

Open access

Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and progressive disease, characterized by increased vascular resistance leading to right ventricle (RV) failure. The extent of right ventricular dysfunction crucially influences disease prognosis; however, currently no therapies have specific cardioprotective effects. Besides discussing the pathophysiology of right ventricular adaptation in PAH, this review focuses on the roles of growth factors (GFs) in disease pathomechanism. We also summarize the involvement of GFs in the preservation of cardiomyocyte function, to evaluate their potential as cardioprotective biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets in PAH.

Open access