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Physiology International
Authors: J.A. Loeppky, R.M. Salgado, A.C. Sheard, D.O. Kuethe and C.M. Mermier

Abstract

Reports of VO2 response differences between normoxia and hypoxia during incremental exercise do not agree. In this study VO2 and V E were obtained from 15-s averages at identical work rates during continuous incremental cycle exercise in 8 subjects under ambient pressure (633 mmHg ≈1,600 m) and during duplicate tests in acute hypobaric hypoxia (455 mmHg ≈4,350 m), ranging from 49 to 100% of VO2 peak in hypoxia and 42–87% of VO2 peak in normoxia. The average VO2 was 96 mL/min (619 mL) lower at 455 mmHg (n.s. P = 0.15) during ramp exercises. Individual response points were better described by polynomial than linear equations (mL/min/W). The V E was greater in hypoxia, with marked individual variation in the differences which correlated significantly and directly with the VO2 difference between 455 mmHg and 633 mmHg (P = 0.002), likely related to work of breathing (W b). The greater V E at 455 mmHg resulted from a greater breathing frequency. When a subject's hypoxic ventilatory response is high, the extra work of breathing reduces mechanical efficiency (E). Mean ∆E calculated from individual linear slopes was 27.7 and 30.3% at 633 and 455 mmHg, respectively (n.s.). Gross efficiency (GE) calculated from mean VO2 and work rate and correcting for W b from a V E–VO2 relationship reported previously, gave corresponding values of 20.6 and 21.8 (P = 0.05). Individual variation in V E among individuals overshadows average trends, as also apparent from other reports comparing hypoxia and normoxia during progressive exercise and must be considered in such studies.

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Abstract

The faulty hormonal imprinting theory (published in 1980) and the DOHaD (Developmental Origin of Health and Disease theory (published in 1986) are twin-concepts: both justify the manifestation after long time (in adults) diseases which had been provoked in differentiating cells (e.g. during gestation). This was demonstrated using animal experiments as well, as comparative statistical methods (in human cases). However, there is no explanation for the tools of memorization (even after decades) of the early adversity and the tools of execution (manifestation) in adult age. It seems likely that immune memory is involved to the memorization of early adversity, up to the manifestation of the result (non-communicable diseases). Nevertheless, the relatively short timespan of adaptive immune memory makes this system insuitable for this function, however the newly recognized trained memory of the innate immune system seems to be theoretically suitable for the storage of the records and handling the sequalae, which is the epigenetic reprogramming in the time of provocation, without changes in base sequences (mutation). The flawed (damaged) program is manifested later, in adult age. Evidences are incomplete, so further animal experiments and human observations are needed for justifying the theory.

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Physiology International
Authors: M. Michalis, K.J. Finn, R. Podstawski, S. Gabnai, Á. Koller, A. Cziráki, M. Szántó, Z. Alföldi and F. Ihász

Abstract

Within recent years the popularity of sportive activities amongst older people, particularly competitive activities within certain age groups has increased. The purpose of this study was to assess the differences in the cardiorespiratory output at anaerobic threshold and at maximal power, output during an incremental exercise, among senior and young athletes. Ten elderly male subjects [mean (SD) age: 68.45 ± 9.32 years] and eight young male subjects [mean (SD) age: 25.87 ± 5.87 years] performed an incremental exercise test on a treadmill ergometer. No significant differences in body size were evident; however, the differences between the groups for peak power (451.62 ± 49 vs. 172.4 ± 32.2 W), aerobic capacity (57.97 ± 7.5 vs. 40.36 ± 8.6 mL kg−1 min−1), maximal heart rate (190.87 ± 9.2 vs. 158.5 ± 9.1 beats min−1), peak blood lactate (11 ± 1.7 vs. 7.3 ± 1.4 mmol L−1), and % VO2max at ventilatory thresholds (93.18 ± 4.3 vs. 79.29 ± 9.9%) were significantly lower in the senior athletes. The power output at anaerobic threshold was also higher (392 ± 48 vs. 151 ± 23 W) in the young athletes, explaining the significant difference in terms of performance between these groups. We have observed an evident deterioration in some of the cardiovascular parameters; however, the submaximal exercise economy seems to be preserved with aging. Exercise economy (i.e. metabolic cost of sustained submaximal exercise) was not different considerably with age in endurance-trained adults.

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Abstract

Objective

Prior research has evaluated the effects of acute exercise on episodic memory function. These studies have, on occasion, demonstrated that acute exercise may enhance both short- and long-term memory. It is uncertain as to whether the acute exercise improvements in long-term memory are a result of acute exercise attenuating declines in long-term memory, or rather, are driven by the enhancement effects of acute exercise on short-term memory. The present empirical study evaluates whether the decline from short- to long-term is influenced by acute exercise. This relationship is plausible as exercise has been shown to activate neurophysiological pathways (e.g., RAC1) that are involved in the mechanisms of forgetting.

Methods

To evaluate the effects of acute exercise on forgetting, we used data from 12 of our laboratory's prior experiments (N = 538). Across these 12 experiments, acute exercise ranged from 10 to 15 mins in duration (moderate-to-vigorous intensity). Episodic memory was assessed from word-list or paragraph-based assessments. Short-term memory was assessed immediately after encoding, with long-term memory assessed approximately 20-min later. Forgetting was calculated as the difference in short- and long-term memory performance.

Results

Acute exercise (vs. seated control) was not associated with an attenuated forgetting effect (d = 0.10; 95% CI: −0.04, 0.25, P = 0.17). We observed no evidence of a significant moderation effect (Q = 6.16, df = 17, P = 0.17, I 2 = 0.00) for any of the evaluated parameters, including study design, exercise intensity and delay period.

Conclusion

Across our 12 experimental studies, acute exercise was not associated with an attenuated forgetting effect. We discuss these implications for future research that evaluates the effects of acute exercise on long-term memory function.

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Physiology International
Authors: M. Nakamura, N. Satoh, H. Tsukada, T. Mizuno, W. Fujii, A. Suzuki, S. Horita, M. Nangaku and M. Suzuki

Abstract

Purpose

Acid-base transport in renal proximal tubules (PTs) is mainly sodium-dependent and conducted in coordination by the apical Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3), vacuolar H+-adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase), and the basolateral Na+/HCO3 - cotransporter. V-ATPase on PTs is well-known to play an important role in proton excretion. Recently we reported a stimulatory effect of insulin on these transporters. However, it is unclear whether insulin is involved in acid-base balance in PTs. Thus, we assessed the role of insulin in acid-base balance in PTs.

Methods

V-ATPase activity was evaluated using freshly isolated PTs obtained from mice, and specific inhibitors were then used to assess the signaling pathways involved in the observed effects.

Results

V-ATPase activity in PTs was markedly enhanced by insulin, and its activation was completely inhibited by bafilomycin (a V-ATPase-specific inhibitor), Akt inhibitor VIII, and PP242 (an mTORC1/2 inhibitor), but not by rapamycin (an mTORC1 inhibitor). V-ATPase activity was stimulated by 1 nm insulin by approximately 20% above baseline, which was completely suppressed by Akt1/2 inhibitor VIII. PP242 completely suppressed the insulin-mediated V-ATPase stimulation in mouse PTs, whereas rapamycin failed to influence the effect of insulin. Insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in the mouse renal cortex was completely suppressed by Akt1/2 inhibitor VIII and PP242, but not by rapamycin.

Conclusion

Our results indicate that stimulation of V-ATPase activity by insulin in PTs is mediated via the Akt2/mTORC2 pathway. These results reveal the mechanism underlying the complex signaling in PT acid-base balance, providing treatment targets for renal disease.

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Beköszöntő

111 éves az Üllői úti Semmelweis Egyetem I. sz. Sebészeti Klinikájának épülete

Magyar Sebészet
Author: Attila Szijártó
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