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Abstract

The primary objective of the present inquiry is to formulate a sustainable method employing Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) for determination of Amlodipine (AM) and Irbesartan (IRB) simultaneously, compounds commonly prescribed for hypertension treatment. Existing literature underscores the absence of a comprehensive method in this regard. This research endeavors to align with the tenets of green chemistry by seamlessly integrating Analytical Quality by Design (AQbD) with RP-HPLC, replacing environmentally hazardous chemical modifiers with eco-friendly solvents. Identifying the critical variables as the 70% ethanol level and flow rate, a central composite design is applied for optimization. The separation is achieved utilizing a Phenomenex Luna column (C 18 , 250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d, 5 μm) with a mobile phase comprising ethanol and 0.1 % o-phosphoric acid in a 70:30 v/v ratio, flowing at 0.8 mL min−1, and detection wavelength of 242 nm. Green assessment methodologies are implemented to gauge the adherence of the proposed RP-HPLC method to eco-friendly principles while ensuring efficiency in chromatographic performance. The current developed method is rapid with retention time of 2.3 and 3.3 min for AM and IRB respectively and having a wide linear range from 55 to 130 μg mL−1, which makes the suitable for the accurate quantification of AM and IRB simultaneously in bulk and tablet dosage form, there by minimize environmental impact by providing a conscientious choice for the routine analysis which is achieved through the amalgamation of AQbD with a sustainable approach.

Open access

Abstract

Background

While the acute effects of high-load resistance training on the force generating capacity of muscles have been widely examined, limited data exist on the relationship with the force-velocity profile (FV). Evidence suggests high sensitivity of the vertical FV profile to monitor changes in the muscle's mechanical properties according to the type of the exercise protocol. However, the interpretation of the findings seems not as straightforward. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a high-load resistance training protocol on the muscle's mechanical properties during loaded jumps and on the vertical force-velocity profile (FV) in relation to maximal strength.

Methods

29 resistance-trained male (mean age±SD: 35.4 ± 7.8 years) and 29 female athletes (mean age±SD: 32.5 ± 7.0 years) participated in the study. Five-repetition maximum (5RM) in back squat, unloaded countermovement jump (CMJ) and FV profile were assessed. Loaded jumps were performed against 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent of body mass. Participants performed exercise protocols corresponding to their 5RM. Immediately after, unloaded CMJ and FV profile measurements were repeated.

Results

A significant decrease in CMJ height (∼5–6%) and in average power (∼4%) was recorded for both men and women. The FV profile did not change after the exercise protocol; however, there was a significant decrease in theoretical maximal power (from 4 to 5%) and in theoretical maximal velocity (∼3%). Maximal strength was not associated with the changes in FV profile.

Conclusions

Findings suggest that an acute high-load exercise decreased vertical jump performance and maximal power output, but without a concomitant change in FV profile. The large interindividual variability in FV measures indicates a less straightforward connection of the applied exercise with the acute response in the FV profile, highlighting the complexity of the FV profile to monitor changes in response to an acute training load.

Open access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
F. Brahmi
,
S. Achat
,
I. Mateos-Aparicio
,
T. Sahki
,
O. Bedjou
,
N. Ben Bara
,
L. Benazzouz-Smail
,
H. Haddadi-Guemghar
,
K. Madani
, and
L. Boulekbache-Makhlouf

Abstract

This work proposes the optimisation of the ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) for total phenolic content (TPC) from potato peels (PP). The optimised extract was obtained using ethanol 20% (v/v) for 30 min at 40 °C, and it was found to be rich in total phenolics (45.03 ± 4.16 mg GAE/g DM) and flavonoids (7.52 EQ/g DM) and exerted a good antioxidant effect with IC50s of 125.42 ± 2.78, 87.21 ± 7.72, and 200.77 ± 13.38 μg mL−1 for DPPH, phosphomolybdate, and FRAP, respectively. PP were used for the fresh cheese formulation, and this supplementation did not impact its physicochemical properties; however, the phenol content and antioxidant capacity of formulated cheeses were improved. PP-enriched fresh cheese presented a good acceptability, even better than the control.

Restricted access

Abstract

Background and aims

This qualitative ethnographic study of a psychedelic integration group in the Southeastern United States contributes to an understanding of the role of supportive communities in processing psychedelic experiences. This article proposes the concept of ‘social efficacy’ to capture the importance of social relationships to the efficacy of psychedelics. Social efficacy refers to a source of efficacy that includes not just the immediate social environment in which psychedelics are experienced and processed, but also the broad range of social relationships and political economic and historical contexts that frame their use.

Methods

This year-long ethnographic research project took place with a psychedelic integration group in an urban center in the Southeastern United States. It was based on observation, interviews, and a focus group.

Results

Overall, the participants in the integration group see the group as critical to their ability to effectively process their psychedelic experiences. The group is important as a supportive community of like-minded people that facilitates enduring cognitive and affective transformation.

Conclusions

Community-based non-therapeutic integration groups can play a vital role in the positive integration of psychedelic experiences, improving mental health and quality of life for users. The important role of community-based groups has significance for both the legalization and the medicalization of psychedelics. It highlights the need for safe and legal spaces in which people can talk about their psychedelic experiences and for medical models of efficacy that include social, relational elements.

Open access
Pollack Periodica
Authors:
Josef Hadipramana
,
Fetra Venny Riza
,
Ade Faisal
,
Bambang Hadibroto
, and
Shahrul Niza Mokhatar

Abstract

The study aims to investigate and find natural fiber as concrete reinforcement using the self-compacting concrete method. Methods of adding fiber and self-compacting concrete methods are exciting because these two methods have different characteristics and advantages. Therefore, the performance of the fresh-state flow capability of the self-compacting concrete method, which contains various fibers, was observed. Coconut fiber, pineapple leaf fiber, ijuk sugar palm fiber, and artificial polypropylene fiber were used with varying compositions of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7% by mass of binder. The results show that coconut and pineapple fiber concrete met the European Guidelines for Self-Compacting Concrete standards. The coconut and pineapple fiber concrete performed admirably in all tests.

Restricted access

Abstract

Over the past decade, numerous open-label studies and early clinical trials have shown that psychedelics hold promise for the fast and possibly lasting relief of a wide range of conditions ranging from major depressive disorder, end-of-life anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder to smoking, alcohol use, and eating disorders. Among the questions still to be resolved in this endeavor are questions related to the importance of the metaphysical and phenomenological aspects of the psychedelic experience. Are the hallucinatory experiences engendered by classical psychedelics necessary to their therapeutic action, or could a trip that doesn't go anywhere have the same effect on depression and other conditions? This commentary considers the value of the phenomenological psychedelic experience and asks the larger question, what are any of our phenomenological experiences for?

Open access

Abstract

With a surge in critiques levelled against the evidence generated by randomised controlled trials in the study of psychedelic-assisted therapy (PAT), and the legalization of PAT in select jurisdictions such as Australia, and Oregon and Colorado in the United States, we consider what form the real-world evidence of its effects could take. Specifically, we propose to complement individual-level data-gathering (the usual remit of pharmacovigilance procedures) with evidence of PAT's collective effects. Taking our cue from long-standing claims that psychedelics are agents of social transformation, we draw upon the ‘transformative paradigm’ of evaluation, an approach that is itself oriented around social justice and change vis-à-vis marginalised expertise – or what we approach as ‘the grassroots’. To illustrate the potential of such grassroots evaluations, we offer eight examples of social issues that have been discussed in relation to PAT and psychedelics use and, for each, discuss the kinds of expertise that could be brought into the evaluation team and the kinds of questions that could be asked. We further describe our grassroots approach according to three values inspired by the qualities of grass roots themselves: rhizomatic accountability, dark reflexivity, and more-than-human hosting. We argue that these values align with the contemporary experience, practice, and context of PAT. We hope to generate discussion, innovation, and – ultimately – action toward specific study designs that are adequate to the task of documenting, and working with, the transformative potential of psychedelics in contemporary medicalized societies.

Open access

Abstract

Serious risks to human health are posed by acute campylobacteriosis, an enteritis syndrome caused by oral infection with the food-borne bacterial enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Since the risk for developing post-infectious autoimmune complications is intertwined with the severity of enteritis, the search of disease-mitigating compounds is highly demanded. Given that benzoic acid is an organic acid with well-studied health-promoting including anti-inflammatory effects we tested in our present study whether the compound might be a therapeutic option to alleviate acute murine campylobacteriosis. Therefore, microbiota-depleted IL-10−/− mice were perorally infected with C. jejuni and received benzoic acid through the drinking water from day 2 until day 6 post-infection. The results revealed that benzoic acid treatment did not affect C. jejuni colonization in the gastrointestinal tract, but alleviated clinical signs of acute campylobacteriosis, particularly diarrheal and wasting symptoms. In addition, benzoic acid mitigated apoptotic cell responses in the colonic epithelia and led to reduced pro-inflammatory immune reactions in intestinal, extra-intestinal, and systemic compartments tested on day 6 post-infection. Hence, our preclinical placebo-controlled intervention trial revealed that benzoic acid constitutes a promising therapeutic option for treating acute campylobacteriosis in an antibiotic-independent fashion and in consequence, also for reducing the risk of post-infectious autoimmune diseases.

Open access