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Abstract

The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between undergraduate students' admission practices and their academic performance. The participants of this study were 233 undergraduate students who were in their first and third-year studies as well as two Madda Walabu University Professors. A mixed Research method was employed to analyze the data collected through Questionnaires, Interviews, and Documents. T-tests and correlation coefficients were performed to see the differences between students' academic performance and their admission practices. The result of this study revealed that there is a significant positive relationship between the students' admission practice and their academic performances at this University. This study determined that one of the factors impeding students' learning and academic performance at Madda Walabu University was the admission practice employed at this University to enroll students into different academic Programs. Therefore, this study expands the understanding that admission practices are among the factors influencing students' academic performances.

Open access

Abstract

In his paper the author deals with the contributions of a new volume on the history of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century and added several additional notes to each paper. As several papers studied the relationship of Ravenna and Attila the Hun the author examined the written sources concerning the Huns in detail and came to the conclusion that there was only one foedus concluded with Attila after 433 and Pannonia was ceded to the Huns in this treaty. Attila was formally the magister militum of the Western Roman Empire.

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Abstract

Vessels decorated with domed metal discs were extraordinarily rare and valuable commodities of the Late Bronze Age. Pottery adorned with bronze discs and tin first appeared in Hungary during the earlier Urnfield period (14th/13th century BC). A vessel adorned with three ring motifs inlaid with a high-tin alloy on its belly is known from Nagykanizsa-Bilkei-dűlő and a cup decorated with bronze domed discs was recovered from Grave 222 of the Vörs-Battyáni-Disznólegelő cemetery, both in southern Transdanubia. The decorative bronze discs similarly had a high tin content. The metal composition was analysed with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. Pendant ornaments of “white bronze”, an alloy with a high tin content, are principally known from southern Transdanubia: the elemental composition of two pendants with bird protomes from Grave 51 of the Vörs-Battyáni-Disznólegelő cemetery and of a funnel-shaped pendant from the Pamuk hoard were examined by PIXE for compositional make-up, which indicated a high tin content for all three. These pendants had been worn as adornments. Tin was an important raw material in the production of bronze. Most of the vessels decorated with bronze discs were brought to light in the late Urnfield cemetery uncovered at Budapest-Békásmegyer (boot- and amphora-shaped vessels, a feeding vessel, resin balls). It seems likely that these vessels had once served ritual purposes. Regrettably, they have not yet been submitted to PIXE analyses.

Open access

Abstract

The curious shape of the so-called early Christian mausoleum of Iovia, Pannonia has attracted much attention since its discovery in the 1980s. The main part of the building, a hexagon flanked by alternating semi-circular and rectangular rooms was complemented by a bi-apsidal vestibule and a rectangular peristyle courtyard. The hexagon was a relatively rarely used form in late antique architecture compared to the octagon, however, hexagons can still be detected in all parts of the Roman Empire in all kinds of architectural contexts: they appeared in late Roman villae, baths, funerary buildings, early Christian mausolea and baptisteries.

The architectural parallels of the mausoleum of Iovia are traced among the thin-walled hexagons that were flanked by protruding semi-circular and rectangular rooms. The buildings closest in shape were the pagan mausoleum of Louin in France and the trefoil hall of the Villa of Aiano in Italy. Other related structures include the so-called Stibadium A of the Villa with Peristyle in Mediana in Serbia, the reception rooms of the Keynsham villa in England, the hexagonal hall of the Palace of Antiochus in Constantinople, the Domus delle Sette Sale in Rome, the baptistery of Limoges in France, and the cella quinquichora of Aquincum in Hungary. Although similar in general layout, they had different functions: early Christian mausoleum, baptistery, pagan mausoleum, and foremost dining halls or reception rooms. This warns us that it is essential to study early Christian buildings in the context of late antique architecture in its complexity and not only in the limited context of other early Christian buildings. Late antique architects seem to have been fascinated by the opportunities offered by the different polygonal or central-plan halls and buildings and used them for different purposes.

Open access

Abstract

Background and Aims

Research on psychedelic-assisted therapy (PAT), a promising treatment option for major depression, has not revealed if potential clients show preferences about the demographic characteristics of providers comparable to those common in other forms of psychotherapy. Previous work suggests that honoring comparable client preferences can enhance therapeutic outcomes. This study aims to investigate the importance ratings for a same-gender and a same-race therapist in both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and PAT.

Methods

Participants (N = 635) responded between December 2020 and January 2021 on Amazon's Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing platform. Participants rated the import of provider characteristics, including having a provider who is the same-gender or the same-race, for a CBT therapist and a PAT guide.

Results

Importance ratings for a same-gender practitioner varied by both race and gender; racial and ethnic minority and female participants had the highest importance ratings for a same-gender practitioner. A same-gender CBT therapist was more important than a same-gender PAT guide. Importance ratings for a same-race practitioner did not differ by therapy type or gender and only varied by race; racial and ethnic minority participants rated a same-race practitioner as more important than White participants.

Conclusions

Accommodating client preferences appears important, particularly for members of racial, ethnic, and gender minority groups. A concerted effort to train diverse CBT therapists and PAT guides to meet this demand seems justified.

Open access

The gallows in Holíč (Skalica district, Slovakia) archaeological research and virtual reconstruction

Šibenica v Holíči (okres Skalica, Slovensko). Archeologický výskum a pokus o virtuálnu rekonštrukciu

Akasztófa Holicsban (Skalicai járás, Szlovákia). Régészeti kutatás és kísérlet a virtuális rekonstrukcióra

Archaeologiai Értesítő
Authors:
Daniel Bešina
,
Stanislava Bönde Gogová
, and
Pavol Šteiner

Abstract

The archaeological research of the gallows in Holíč is one of the first purposefully surveyed sites of this kind in Slovakia. The issue of research on execution sites is only marginally dealt with in our territory. The research confirmed the presence of a simple brick gallows with two supporting posts. Skeletal remains of human bodies discovered in the excavated area are no less important in this context. The information and the finds can contribute to the study of capital execution and types of gallows not only in the territory of today's Slovakia, but also in the wider area of the historical Kingdom of Hungary. The features datable to the Second World War are also worth mentioning and provide an ideal opportunity to compare archaeological finds of modern military history with the available written sources.

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The investigation of ninth–eleventh century burials from Himod (NW Hungary)

Physical anthropology data in the light of artifact typology

Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Piroska Rácz
and
Péter Langó

Abstract

This study presents the results of a classic physical anthropological and paleopathological study of the early medieval human bone material from the Himod-Káposztáskertek site. A smaller part of the graves can be dated to the ninth century but the majority of graves dates to the tenth–eleventh century. Since the possibility of population continuity was raised, the archaeological data related to the question were also reviewed (with special emphasis on the typology of a knife found in Grave 68), with the intent of seeing whether the anthropological data supported this hypothesis. Both samples represent only a small number of cases and the remains are poorly preserved. The ninth century series especially provided very little data, ultimately making comparison impossible. The remains of 25 individuals were found in the Carolingian cemetery section: childburials number 15, the juvenile age group is not represented by any skeletons, there are ten adult burials (4 males, 5 females, 1 of undeterminable sex). The skeletons from 87 individuals were excavated from the tenth–eleventh century section of the cemetery, of which 25 were children, 5 were juveniles, and 57 were adults (29 males, 28 females). For both men and women, people of tall stature form the majority; male skulls are characterized by large absolute dimensions, mainly a broad forehead and a broad face. Fractures, degenerative changes of the spine and extravertebral joints (especially the elbow joint) were common. Tuberculosis infection was suspected in the case of one individual. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease with bilateral involvement and a rare developmental disorder, congenital scoliosis, occurred in the material as well.

Open access