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Arts and Humanities journals’ primary focus is on presenting theoretical and empirical research in these respective fields. The main goal is to encourage educational research and connect academia to the scientific community. Researchers and scholars need to share their research findings with others to help better understand and act on the ongoing social changes in the field. The Arts and Humanities journals aim to provide a platform for everyone who shares a common interest in these fields and to group all the latest field findings in one place.

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Komödie und Pornographie

Catulls Carm. 10 über die Gefahren erotischer Literatur

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
Heiko Ullrich

Abstract

Catullusʼ Carm. 10 seems to present the speaker as a miles gloriosus duped by the girlfriend of Varus, presumably a friend of the poet and fellow Neoteric. While it has been claimed that Plautusʼ Miles Gloriosus is the most influential role model for Carm. 10, the present article shows that the speaker employs a variety of scenes both from Plautusʼ and Terenceʼs comedies to adopt and maintain the mask of the parasitus who suffers from his financial failure and personal humiliation during the time spent with the praetor Memmius in Bithynia. But Varus and his girlfriend want to hear other stories from the famous province of the infamous encounter between King Nikomedes and young Julius Caesar – and the speaker seems to perform according to this expectations when he calls Memmius an irrumator and (one of) his hosts a cinaedior. But in the end he is not willing to write pornography on demand even if some of his friends (including Aurelius and Furius of Carm. 16 as well as Varus of Carm. 10) consider the poet not just up to the task but currently the best choice for such delicate matters.

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Die schwüle Welt des Harems •

Erotische Phantasmagorien der frühen Neuzeit

Hungarian Studies
Author:
Brigitta Pesti

Abstract

In the 18th century, as political and economic relations with the East strengthened, and the first travelogues on Turkey and various other works on ethnological, geographical and cultural topics were published, a particularly positive reception of the Orient became widespread, originating from the southern and south-eastern Europe. As a result, the image of the threatening apocalyptic enemy, the “bloodhound”, was replaced by the stereotype of an attractive and exotic foreigner.

The euphoric reception of Ottoman culture was initially manifested in the presentation of operas and Turkish feasts held in noble and royal courts, but was also exhibited in portraits of people in Turkish clothes, posing among oriental backdrops. Depictions of harems and odalisque (harem ladies) were important motifs of these paintings from the very start. At the beginning of the fashion of Orientalism, the theme of the harem, also known as Turquerie, appeared only in the circles of the highest aristocracy, as a spicy bit of its self-representation, but by the 19th century, the identification of harem and erotica and, in many cases, harem and open sexuality, had become widespread in European fine arts.

In my study, I aim to review briefly the appearances of the motif of the harem in literature and the fine arts, as well as the literary and cultural historical development of its erotic connotations, and offer its interpretation in a Central European context.

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Abstract

This article deals with the enigmatic biography and the controversial oeuvre of Karl Maria Kertbeny (recte: Karl Maria Benkert; 1824-1882). Kertbeny was a representative of the so-called Hungarus identity, a convinced Hungarian of non-Hungarian mother tongue. He worked primarily as a journalistic mediator and literary translator and was largely responsible for the image of Hungary and of Hungarian culture and literature in German-speaking countries, especially in the period from the middle of the 19th century onwards. In the article, the overly critical attitude that posterity took towards Kertbeny is set to some extent straight.

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Abstract

Through personal narratives of powwow involvement and motivation for dancing, this essay examines the ways in which regional and personal identities are being formed, adjusted, negotiated, and expressed through dance regalia at powwows in the Midwestern United States. Dancers use clothes as an explicit marker of their Native identity and powwows as a justifying context for their ideologies of authenticity. Powwow involvement is also used to consolidate, reclaim, craft, revive, and create an identity that authenticates one's place in the powwow community in which internal and external roles and rules reinforce each other. Giving voice to different constituents at Midwestern powwows, from Natives to non-Native enthusiasts, the study explores the factors that influence the bases and strategies of such authentication, as well as the rhetoric by which these ideologies are expressed.

Open access

“The Sisters of the Redeemer in the Trauma of Dispersion”. •

The Sisters of the Divine Redeemer in the 1950s and 1960s in the Light of Recollections and State Security Reports

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author:
Katalin Paréj-Farkas

Abstract

While researching the history of the Sisters of the Divine Redeemer, also referred to as the Sisters of the Redeemer, it became clear that the ordeals of the Second World War and the Communist dictatorship had a profound impact on the congregation, which was engaged in nursing and teaching. The sources allow us to reconstruct the horrors of the advancing battlefront and the sisters' flight, along with their determination to provide social assistance and their role in saving Jews. The Communist regime that emerged after the war forced the congregation into an increasingly impossible situation, depriving them of their teaching positions and nursing vocation. Their internment in 1950 and the revocation of the congregation's operating license seemed to have eliminated the community entirely. However, recollections of the events of the 1950s and 1960s, together with state security reports, attest that the congregation survived in the form of a “subterranean stream,” and that tiny communities of sisters continued to pursue their monastic vocation, often in a single apartment that functioned as a mini convent. The traumas they had experienced rarely crushed the sisters' inner sense of peace, and they strove to cope with the harassments inflicted by the party-state by adapting to the new situation.

Open access

Abstract

Focusing on the concept of ‘folklore text,’ the study surveys the textological dilemmas that a researcher faces during the collection, transcription, publication, and interpretation of folk poetry. Behind the development and implementation of strategies for text editing procedures lie complex cultural processes, which can be interpreted within the framework of the given discipline or placed within a broader cultural and technological historical context. The paper examines the methodological history of Hungarian folklore collections not only according to the theoretical concepts that define the research subject and research aspects but also based on the objective, technological conditions of the collection. The author proposes a folklore textological approach to the publication of texts that is much more conscious of the historicity and origin of folklore texts and considers their own philological-textological tradition. A new, process-based, and transcriber-centered concept of text would provide an intriguing direction for solving numerous folklore textological problems, which might show the role collectors and transcribers play in the creation of a text in a sharper and more nuanced light. The findings of the study are based on investigations carried out in the field of historical folklore text research, primarily on the examination of the methodological history of the collection and transcription of folktales; with certain restrictions, their applicability might be extended in terms of subject matter (to other genres) and time (even to the latest folklore phenomena arising in the digital medium), and they may also provide useful perspectives for representatives of other disciplines that study orality.

Open access