Browse our Arts and Humanities Journals

Discover the Latest Journals in the Field of Arts and Humanities

Arts and Humanities journals’ primary focus is on presenting theoretical and empirical research in these respective fields. The main goal is to encourage educational research and connect academia to the scientific community. Researchers and scholars need to share their research findings with others to help better understand and act on the ongoing social changes in the field. The Arts and Humanities journals aim to provide a platform for everyone who shares a common interest in these fields and to group all the latest field findings in one place.

Arts and Humanities

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 9,300 items for

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Abstract

Explicitation might be the most discussed phenomenon in Translation Studies history, and yet the most elusive of them all. This study aims to contribute to the literature on the cognitive relevance-theoretic approach to explicitation and implicitation, adopting the view that translation is a type of pragmatically communicative and interpretive act. First, the study presents a brief critical overview of selected existing accounts of explicitation and implicitation to show how the definitions are riddled with circularity and the classifications with lack of conformity. Second, it addresses the existing relevance-theoretic models in an attempt to reconcile their classifications in a unified, applicable relevance-theoretic model of analysis. It puts to good use the fuller account of the range of pragmatic processes widely discussed in Relevance Theory; namely, disambiguation, reference assignment, free enrichment, higher-level explicature and ad hoc concept. The corpus of the study is selected articles from Nature, as representative of scientific and technical discourse, in English and their translations into Arabic as published in the Arabic edition of Nature. The study leans upon Gutt's Optimal Relevance theory and Pym's Risk Management hypothesis to explain the outcomes of the analysis.

Restricted access

Abstract

In corpus-based interpreting studies, typical challenges exist in the time-consuming and labour-intensive nature of transcribing spoken data and in identifying prosodic properties. This paper addresses these challenges by exploring methods for the automatic compilation of multimodal interpreting corpora, with a focus on English/Chinese Consecutive Interpreting. The results show that: 1) automatic transcription can achieve an accuracy rate of 95.3% in transcribing consecutive interpretations; 2) prosodic properties related to filled pauses, unfilled pauses, articulation rate, and mispronounced words can be automatically extracted using our rule-based programming; 3) mispronounced words can be effectively identified by employing Confidence Measure, with any word having a Confidence Measure lower than 0.321 considered as mispronounced; 4) automatic alignment can be achieved through the utilisation of automatic segmentation, sentence embedding, and alignment techniques. This study contributes to interpreting studies by broadening the empirical understanding of orality, enabling multimodal analyses of interpreting products, and providing a new methodological solution for the construction and utilisation of multimodal interpreting corpora. It also has implications in exploring applicability of new technologies in interpreting studies.

Restricted access

Abstract

Since the early 2000s when the possibility of a network approach in translation studies (TS) was noted, social network analysis (SNA) has been applied to explore the relational complexity of various translational agents in practical, industrial, academic, and educational settings. Through a systematic review, this paper shows that SNA's major contributions to TS have been mainly in areas of translation history, translation economy, translation scientometrics, translation education, and online collaborative translation. It also identifies how SNA has adapted to and complemented other methodological and theoretical approaches in TS under two paradigms, i.e., explanatory structuralist and exploratory complex paradigms. In light of the review, strengths and weakness of these paradigms are discussed, and suggestions are provided for further research on their confluence, which is characterized by a less reductionist analytic model with appropriate explanatory power in a closer symbiosis between complexity theory and SNA.

Restricted access

Abstract

Scholars have conflicting views as to strategy choice between foreignization and domestication, and each view is supported by descriptive case analyses. So far, translation practitioners' voices on strategy use have not been heard. This study aims to explore translators' views on strategy choice, shaping factors, and justifications. The participants surveyed were translators of academic texts in Humanities and Social Sciences, a genre requiring substantial and creative interventions from translators in rhetorical norms and epistemological conventions. The results indicate that: domestication is used more often than foreignization; strategy use is translator-specific in that the translators are divided concerning the manipulation of the macro-level source-text features and content, though most of them agree to domesticate the micro-level features; eight factors (target readers' needs, authors, etc.) exert different degrees of impact on strategy use; and the current practices of justifying strategy use is invisible, harming the recognition of translators' contributions and their professional status.

Restricted access

Abstract

Distance interpreting (DI) refers to interpreting services provided by interpreters at a remote location, facilitated through information and communication technologies. DI has been widely employed in a multitude of contexts, ranging from multilingual diplomacy conferences and public service sectors to global business negotiations and live-broadcasting programs, among others. Although empirical studies have provided extensive insights into DI, the findings show a certain degree of dispersion and complexity, indicating a need for further investigation. This study set out to conduct a systematic review of the empirical DI research with the aim of providing an evidence-backed synthesis of the current DI research and predicting potential future research directions. Applying the PRISMA guidelines, we identified 39 journal articles on DI through an electronic search and a snowballing procedure. We then coded and synthesized these articles based on a framework comprising three main elements: demographics, methodology, and research themes. Four prominent research themes were identified: (1) interpreters' adaptation, (2) technical considerations in DI, (3) client satisfaction, and (4) DI quality assessment. Based on these, we discuss four possible directions for future DI research: replication studies of onsite interpreting research, research in diverse settings, incorporation of modern technology, and experiments on diverse language combinations.

Restricted access

Abstract

In recent decades, there has been a growing interest in multimodal translation studies. However, there is currently no suitable framework available for analyzing how the original meaning is reconstructed through the interaction of various semiotic resources in the multimodal target text. Under this context, this article proposes a systemic functional framework that integrates the systems of the meaning potential of semiotic resources, including language, sound (human voice), objects, space, and semiotic ensembles of the human body, and a tripartite classification of the relationships between semiotic resources. To exemplify the analytical potential of the framework, this article presents an example of analysis, taking an excerpt from Fences as the object of analysis.

Restricted access

Abstract

This study investigates ad hoc knowledge in interpreting – knowledge specifically relevant to an interpreting task, usually acquired by interpreters at pre-service and in-service stages. A quasi-experiment asked eight English–Chinese professional interpreters to prepare for and interpret two speeches with different degrees of specialisation. Five datasets were collected: (1) screen and video recordings of their preparation processes; (2) their responses to a follow-up questionnaire; (3) their scores and answers on a domain knowledge test; (4) their interpreting performance, rated by both professional interpreters and domain experts; (5) the speaker's answers to a few open questions on domain knowledge. Parts of the first and second datasets were used to examine what ad hoc knowledge the interpreters needed; the remaining three datasets, together with recording data from the first, were used to investigate the extent of their need for this knowledge. The findings show that ad hoc knowledge is domain-relevant, yet its scope is highly interpreting-specific, being neither deep nor wide; and it is by nature different from domain knowledge, mainly including speech-relevant expressive knowledge about certain domain(s) and the contextual knowledge interpreters use in their preparation. The implications of these findings for interpreting practice and training are also discussed.

Restricted access