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Abstract

Techno-typological analysis of two chipped stone assemblages from Šenov-Salaš 1 and 4 in the Moravian Gate (Czech Republic) indicates they belong to the Aurignacian. The two assemblages, preferentially made of Baltic (erratic) flints, comprise few distinctive tool types, though. A statistical analysis was conducted to compare their raw material strategy, tool typology, and topography with other Moravian Aurignacian sites. It transpired that they answer to other Aurignacian sites in their specific topography, raw material strategy, and (a few) Aurignacian endscrapers, but both assemblages comprise few carinated burins. The altitude here is somewhat higher than that for most Moravian Aurignacian sites, but it is still probable that the two assemblages belong to the Aurignacian and that their rather atypical aspect (the small dimensions of artefacts, simple core preparation, few distinctive tools) are due to the small size of the processed flint nodules, which did not allow for thorough core preparation. Predominant plain butts, the virtual absence of archaic, or other distinctive tool types speak for either Evolved Aurignacian or some specific Aurignacian facies of the Moravian Gate. The assemblages cannot be linked with the young AMS 14C date 14 270 ± 40 uncal BP, acquired from a bone from the surface at Salaš 1, just slightly preceding the Moravian Magdalenian, as such a date would be too young not only for any Aurignacian but also for Epiaurignacian sites. Still, the Aurignacian estimation of the assemblages is interesting as the Moravian Gate comprises relatively few sites attributed to this Upper Palaeolithic culture.

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Abstract

The aim of this note is to review the passage of Polyaenus, Stratagemata 5. 2. 12. The seizure of Amphipolis by the Syracusans, narrated by Polyaenus, may have taken place in 388, when Dionysius I sent a war fleet to the northern Aegean Sea. The presence of Syracusans in the city on river Strymon may have had an impact on the cultural, religious and artistic life of Amphipolis. In particular, the kidnapping of Kore by Hades on a carriage driven by only two horses in the mosaic of tumulus Kasta near Amphipolis may be due to this western influence.

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The Old Uighur fragment (GT15-64) preserved in National Library of China, Beijing and its parallel fragments (Ch/U 6005 + Ch/U 6411 + Ch/U 7287) preserved in the Berlin Turfan collection are different copies of the same text. This text consists of two parts, an adhyeṣaṇā verse that extols the merit of good deeds, which is immeasurable when one implores the Buddha to turn the dharma-wheel, and a colophon. Although the adhyeṣaṇā part contains many quotations from the Suvarṇaprabhāsasūtra, the colophon indicates that it is an original literary work by Buddhist monks who praise the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra.

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This article revisits the history of Du Fu 杜甫 (zi Zimei 子美, 712–770) studies and demonstrates that although annotated editions of Du Fu’s poetry claim to follow zhiren lunshi 知人論世 (‘knowing the person by considering the age in which he or she lived’) and/or yiyi nizhi 以意逆志 (‘inferring the author’s intention through sympathetic effort’), which are dogmatic approaches that seemingly balance objective and subjective views, they nevertheless lead to the development of highly divergent ideas. Treating the two principles as ‘rules of competition’, annotators have attempted to refute other annotations and commentaries in the process of annotating Du Fu’s poetry. The sense of historicity in Du Fu’s poetry in these editions is also strengthened by the use of these two principles.

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Abstract

In his paper the author deals with the Acts of the Council of Chalcedon where a certain Valerian, the bishop of a settlement called Bassiana emerged several times. As he attended the synod of 448 at Constantinople as well, he lived in Constantinople most probably as refugee. Following E. Schwartz's correction, the author also comes to the conclusion that Valerian was mistakenly identified as the African bishop in the original Greek list and he was rather the bishop of the Pannonian Bassianae. He had to flee from his hometown to Constantinople because of the Hun occupation in 441 as his province already belonged to East Rome.

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