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Arts and Humanities journals’ primary focus is on presenting theoretical and empirical research in these respective fields. The main goal is to encourage educational research and connect academia to the scientific community. Researchers and scholars need to share their research findings with others to help better understand and act on the ongoing social changes in the field. The Arts and Humanities journals aim to provide a platform for everyone who shares a common interest in these fields and to group all the latest field findings in one place.

Arts and Humanities

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Abstract

The paper aims to present the current state, problems, challenges and opportunities of Hungarian native language education. It does so as a tribute to the memory and oeuvre of László Kálmán, who passed away in 2021, and as a way of preserving his approach characterized by a critical approach, but also by a focus on possible solutions. On the one hand, the study outlines the goals and tasks of native language education, including language teaching, drawing heavily on the concept of communicative competence as defined and represented by László Kálmán (see e.g. Kálmán 2010; Kálmán & Molnár 2009). On the other hand, the current state of native language education is described in the light of this framework. In addition to the current regulation of the content of native language education, the study will also describe the current situation with regard to the available teaching aids and textbooks. In this context, and partly independently of it, the paper will examine the question of what major areas of native language education need to be changed and what opportunities are available in this respect.

Open access

Abstract

The main goal of this paper is to provide a preliminary examination of the interaction between the Vulgar Latin grammatical gender system and other levels of linguistic change, such as phonological confusions. To achieve this description conditional inference trees and random forests were fitted to our data which enabled a more thorough understanding of these interactions than would be possible to notice without statistical methods.

Open access

Abstract

The present paper intends to provide a linguistic analysis of votive texts, with particular regard to the case and declension systems as well as their Latin usage and variants. The aim of the linguistic analysis is to identify variations occurring in the context of votive texts. The epigraphic corpus shows various Vulgar Latin features in theonyms and epithets. The names of the deities are cultural characteristics and are influenced by various factors. The inevitable phenomenon of Roman religiosity manifested itself in religious texts, especially where polytheistic religions were particularly prone to borrowing and assimilation. In the investigation, some questions which the study will attempt to answer: do the case and declension confusions of theonyms and epithets follow the characteristics of the given region? The most common feature of religious inscriptions is that the declension of an epithet follows the declension of the name of the deity and vice versa. Another characteristic is the confusion in the case system. Some of these are influenced by facts other than adjective and noun agreement. In some cases, the meaning of the name influences it, in other cases there are cultural reasons for the declension confusion, especially if the inscriptions come from Celtic, Germanic, Greek, or other language areas.

Open access

Abstract

This paper analyses linking vowels of Hungarian in a paradigm-based approach. We argue that the quality of linking vowels is determined by such a complex interaction of phonological, morphological, and morphophonological factors on both stems and suffixes that attributing them to individual morphemes is not plausible. Instead in the model proposed here linking vowels emerge from the identification of initial and final substrings within and across paradigms.

Open access

Abstract

This study investigated the production of Mandarin and Fuzhou lexical tones by Mandarin-Fuzhou bilingual children. Forty children aged 6;11 to 7;6 and two groups of adults (Mandarin speakers and Fuzhou speakers) were asked to produce pre-selected familiar monosyllabic words. Adult judges' perceptual judgments and acoustic analysis showed that: (1) overall, these children's production performance of Mandarin tones was similar to adults', with very high accuracy; (2) children did not reach adult-like production competence in Fuzhou tones by age 7;6; and (3) there was an imbalance in children's development of the seven lexical tones in Fuzhou. Children's late and unbalanced development of Fuzhou tones could be ascribed to their unbalanced Mandarin-Fuzhou exposure, and it is argued that children might transfer the characteristics of the Mandarin tonal system to their production of Fuzhou tones.

Restricted access

Abstract

The paper gives a detailed description of the “A egy N” construction in Hungarian based on a thorough investigation of carefully collected corpus data. Utterances containing this construction express a speaker-related (mostly derogatory, but sometimes appreciative) value judgement. The morphological, syntactic, and pragmatic characteristics of the construction are presented. Furthermore, some formally and pragmatically similar constructions are also discussed and some misleading pieces of information in the earlier literature are debunked.

Open access

Abstract

The theoretical framework adopted in the analysis of Old English obstruents is laryngeal realism, a framework using privative features in modelling laryngeal oppositions. Equipollent oppositions, although real in the phonetic sense, must clearly be delineated from phonology. Old English obstruents are either unmarked (lenis/neutral) or marked: 〈b〉 /b/, 〈d〉 /d/, 〈cg〉 /dʒ/ or /ɟ/, 〈g〉 /ɡ/ are not marked for [voice] (although they are passively voiced between sonorants) and as such cannot regressively voice obstruents, singleton 〈p〉 /p/, 〈t〉 /t/, 〈ć〉 /tʃ/ or /c/, 〈c〉 /k/ are marked for [spread] (aspiration, or GW ‘glottal width’), singleton 〈f〉, 〈þ/ð〉, 〈s〉, 〈g〉, 〈h〉 are unmarked, but are passively voiced in the V ´ FricV/Son environment. Fricatives in unstressed syllables (even when couched between sonorants) are not voiced. If there is a sonorant separating the fricative from the stressed vowel there is no voicing ( V ´ SonFricV/Son). The only voiced fricatives after a stressed vowel+sonorant consonant are /f/ [v] and /x/ [ɣ] (but this is a historical coincidence). (Phonetically voiceless) Geminates, s+stop and f/h+stop clusters are special in that they constitute a sequence of a fortis followed by a lenis obstruent impervious to passive voicing.

Open access

Abstract

This intervention focuses on the close relationship that links Mithras to Hercules, witnessed by the presence of the image of Hercules in some mithraic caves, on ritual vessels and in other contexts related to Zoroastrian Mithraism, such as the funerary monument of Antiochus I of Commagene at Nemrut Dağı.

Likewise, even the veneration of the goddess Caelestis by some followers of Mithras is testified by the representation of the symbol pro itu et reditu in contexts referable to the cult of Mithras.

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Abstract

Károly Kós, along with other Hungarian artists and architects, contributed to the development of a natural approach of culture, based on the local environment and on the local way of life. This is, in his eyes, the right way to the universal. Architecture and music, in particular, are intertwined, as they both attempt to create an agreeable environment to mankind. The transylvanian or Transylvania-inspired art is an example of this proximity between the architectural and the musical language.

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