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Arts and Humanities journals’ primary focus is on presenting theoretical and empirical research in these respective fields. The main goal is to encourage educational research and connect academia to the scientific community. Researchers and scholars need to share their research findings with others to help better understand and act on the ongoing social changes in the field. The Arts and Humanities journals aim to provide a platform for everyone who shares a common interest in these fields and to group all the latest field findings in one place.

Arts and Humanities

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The paper deals with one of clitic third orders in Hittite that involves later than the expected second position of the clitic -(m)a, a contrastive conjunction and discourse marker, otherwise a standard second position clitic. -(m)a is delayed beyond its common second position by clause connectives, subordinators and conjunctions with varying obligatoriness: it is obligatory with clause connectives and optional with subordinators and conjunctions. This study explores in detail the variation with subordinators and conjunctions and it argues that clitic third order in this context is an innovation. In explaining how clitic third order was triggered in this context the etymological hypothesis of Eichner (1971, 1981) is combined with the prosodic explanation of clitic third of Kloekhorst (2014) against an alternative account of Sideltsev (2019).

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In the early modern Ottoman Empire, social identity was closely tied to a hierarchical structure, with the sultanate occupying the highest tier and ordinary subjects positioned at the lower end. Empire’s inhabitants were divided into groups based on the style and color of their clothes. By dressing in clothing from a different gender, socioeconomic class, or ethnoreligious group, one could disguise their true identity and social status. This article endeavors to unveil the motivations that compelled ordinary people to employ clothing as a means to conceal their involvement in criminal activities. Furthermore, it investigates the constraints associated with common identity-altering practices, particularly from the vantage points of religion, gender, and intersectionality. Drawing from an array of archival sources such as mühimme records, chronicles, manuscripts, and qadi court registers, the article scrutinizes the consequences of these practices.

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As many world languages, Turkic also has simple suffixes in terms of structure, as well as complex suffixes with controversial origins. Although some of these suffixes have been systematized and bound to certain rules, the emergence of some suffixes still remains a mystery. Old Uyghur, which is one of the historical periods of the Turkic language, has such an undeciphered suffix. The compound suffix of +DXrtI has been evaluated by some researchers to date; however, no definite conclusion has been reached regarding its origin and function. For this purpose, various structures in Altaic languages will be examined and a connection will be made between this suffix and the ‘extraordinary’ examples seen in Old Uyghur.

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Ethnicity and Representation

Material Folk Art at the Intersection of Local Identity, Minority Policy Goals, and Ethnographers' Aspirations in the 1970s and 1980s in Hungary

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author:
Bence Ament-Kovács

Abstract

Those Germans who remained in Hungary after the Second World War faced complex political, economic, and social difficulties. In cultural terms, the diverse self-definitions of the Germans living in Hungary at that time precluded national cohesion, despite the use by the authorities of the unifying definition “German.” This national minority was bound together primarily by shared trauma. Individuals and communities alike were searching for their place amidst the changed circumstances, and it was the umbrella organization known as the Democratic Association of Germans in Hungary (Magyarországi Németek Demokratikus Szövetsége) that sought to bring them together. It was not until the 1970s that the association began to professionalize its activities and to conduct ethnographic research in cooperation with qualified specialists. During this process, the village of Harta, which was already famous for its folk art, came to their attention. It was specifically the economic potential of this settlement in Bács-Kiskun County, and its character as an ethnic and confessional enclave, that laid the foundations for the uniform objects and motifs of this local center of furniture painting. After the Second World War, the county administration's cultural policy was relatively accepting of the furniture-making tradition here, and the local intelligentsia showed a supportive attitude towards the settlement's German heritage. In the 1970s, there was still a furniture painter living in Harta, who won the most prestigious folk-art award, regularly participated in exhibitions and gala events, and even produced painted furniture in the cooperative's subsidiary branch at the initiative of the local council president. This ensured that painted furniture from Harta came to represent not only the traditionalist aspirations of the German Association, but also national cultural policy. Harta furniture emerged as the most iconic style of minority painted furniture and as the shared heritage of the German community in Hungary.

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Abstract

Explicitation might be the most discussed phenomenon in Translation Studies history, and yet the most elusive of them all. This study aims to contribute to the literature on the cognitive relevance-theoretic approach to explicitation and implicitation, adopting the view that translation is a type of pragmatically communicative and interpretive act. First, the study presents a brief critical overview of selected existing accounts of explicitation and implicitation to show how the definitions are riddled with circularity and the classifications with lack of conformity. Second, it addresses the existing relevance-theoretic models in an attempt to reconcile their classifications in a unified, applicable relevance-theoretic model of analysis. It puts to good use the fuller account of the range of pragmatic processes widely discussed in Relevance Theory; namely, disambiguation, reference assignment, free enrichment, higher-level explicature and ad hoc concept. The corpus of the study is selected articles from Nature, as representative of scientific and technical discourse, in English and their translations into Arabic as published in the Arabic edition of Nature. The study leans upon Gutt's Optimal Relevance theory and Pym's Risk Management hypothesis to explain the outcomes of the analysis.

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In corpus-based interpreting studies, typical challenges exist in the time-consuming and labour-intensive nature of transcribing spoken data and in identifying prosodic properties. This paper addresses these challenges by exploring methods for the automatic compilation of multimodal interpreting corpora, with a focus on English/Chinese Consecutive Interpreting. The results show that: 1) automatic transcription can achieve an accuracy rate of 95.3% in transcribing consecutive interpretations; 2) prosodic properties related to filled pauses, unfilled pauses, articulation rate, and mispronounced words can be automatically extracted using our rule-based programming; 3) mispronounced words can be effectively identified by employing Confidence Measure, with any word having a Confidence Measure lower than 0.321 considered as mispronounced; 4) automatic alignment can be achieved through the utilisation of automatic segmentation, sentence embedding, and alignment techniques. This study contributes to interpreting studies by broadening the empirical understanding of orality, enabling multimodal analyses of interpreting products, and providing a new methodological solution for the construction and utilisation of multimodal interpreting corpora. It also has implications in exploring applicability of new technologies in interpreting studies.

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Since the early 2000s when the possibility of a network approach in translation studies (TS) was noted, social network analysis (SNA) has been applied to explore the relational complexity of various translational agents in practical, industrial, academic, and educational settings. Through a systematic review, this paper shows that SNA's major contributions to TS have been mainly in areas of translation history, translation economy, translation scientometrics, translation education, and online collaborative translation. It also identifies how SNA has adapted to and complemented other methodological and theoretical approaches in TS under two paradigms, i.e., explanatory structuralist and exploratory complex paradigms. In light of the review, strengths and weakness of these paradigms are discussed, and suggestions are provided for further research on their confluence, which is characterized by a less reductionist analytic model with appropriate explanatory power in a closer symbiosis between complexity theory and SNA.

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Scholars have conflicting views as to strategy choice between foreignization and domestication, and each view is supported by descriptive case analyses. So far, translation practitioners' voices on strategy use have not been heard. This study aims to explore translators' views on strategy choice, shaping factors, and justifications. The participants surveyed were translators of academic texts in Humanities and Social Sciences, a genre requiring substantial and creative interventions from translators in rhetorical norms and epistemological conventions. The results indicate that: domestication is used more often than foreignization; strategy use is translator-specific in that the translators are divided concerning the manipulation of the macro-level source-text features and content, though most of them agree to domesticate the micro-level features; eight factors (target readers' needs, authors, etc.) exert different degrees of impact on strategy use; and the current practices of justifying strategy use is invisible, harming the recognition of translators' contributions and their professional status.

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