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Acta Chromatographica
Authors:
Luis Alejandro Pérez-López
,
Norma Cavazos-Rocha
,
Cecilia Delgado-Montemayor
,
Noemí Waksman-Minsky
,
Marcelo Hernández-Salazar
, and
Omar J. Portillo-Castillo

Abstract

The analysis of phenolic acids (PAs) is of great importance, because they are frequently present in natural products and their derivatives, and these compounds also have multiple beneficial effects to human health. This work is focusing on the separation of seven PAs (caffeic acid, coumaric acid, gallic acid, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid, sinapic acid, and syringic acid), in a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) isocratic method using a hydrophilic deep eutectic solvent (DES) as a mobile phase additive. The analysis was carried out with a diode array detector. The used DES was composed by choline chloride and glycerol, and it was characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The combination of choline chloride:glycerol (1:4) added at 0.25% to mobile phase composed of 0.15% formic acid aqueous solution and methanol (80:20), showed the best separation for target analytes. The new proposed method was validated, and results indicated that the proposed method is linear, selective for almost all analytes, provided high sensitivity with limit of detection ranges from 0.009 to 0.023 mg mL−1, and has satisfactory precision and accuracy, with values of relative standard deviation of 0.24–2.65% and recoveries of 97.97–109%, respectively. Additionally, this method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of phenolic acids in three kinds of samples of powder to prepare lemon flavour drink enriched with black tea extract.

Open access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
N. Alberro Macias
,
I. Pupo González
,
L. Valcárcel Rojas
,
D. Frías Fonseca
,
J. R. Estévez Álvarez
,
D. López Sánchez
,
A. Montero Álvarez
,
D. Simón Pérez
,
M. A. Isaac Tejera
, and
J. F. Pérez Oliva

Summary  

The quality of the potable and purified for haemodialysis waters used in the National Institute of Nephrology was evaluated since 2002 up to now. A total of 20 chemical components were analyzed. The analytical results were compared with the admissible maximum concentrations according to the Cuban Standard NC 92-02:85 for potable water and with the Spanish Standard UNE 111-301-90, related to the quality of water for use in haemodialysis. The quality of both types of water was found to comply with the Standards regulations. The CEADEN analytical chemistry laboratory operates a quality management system since 1992, that was credited according to ISO/IEC 17025 requirements.

Restricted access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
,
Daria J. Kuss
,
Lucia Romo
,
Yannick Morvan
,
Laurence Kern
,
Pierluigi Graziani
,
Amélie Rousseau
,
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf
,
Anja Bischof
,
Ann-Kathrin Gässler
,
Adriano Schimmenti
,
Alessia Passanisi
,
Niko Männikkö
,
Maria Kääriänen
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
,
Orsolya Király
,
Mariano Chóliz
,
Juan José Zacarés
,
Emilia Serra
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Halley M. Pontes
,
Bernadeta Lelonek-Kuleta
,
Joanna Chwaszcz
,
Daniele Zullino
,
Lucien Rochat
,
Sophia Achab
, and
Joël Billieux

Background and aims

Despite many positive benefits, mobile phone use can be associated with harmful and detrimental behaviors. The aim of this study was twofold: to examine (a) cross-cultural patterns of perceived dependence on mobile phones in ten European countries, first, grouped in four different regions (North: Finland and UK; South: Spain and Italy; East: Hungary and Poland; West: France, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland), and second by country, and (b) how socio-demographics, geographic differences, mobile phone usage patterns, and associated activities predicted this perceived dependence.

Methods

A sample of 2,775 young adults (aged 18–29 years) were recruited in different European Universities who participated in an online survey. Measures included socio-demographic variables, patterns of mobile phone use, and the dependence subscale of a short version of the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPUQ; Billieux, Van der Linden, & Rochat, 2008).

Results

The young adults from the Northern and Southern regions reported the heaviest use of mobile phones, whereas perceived dependence was less prevalent in the Eastern region. However, the proportion of highly dependent mobile phone users was more elevated in Belgium, UK, and France. Regression analysis identified several risk factors for increased scores on the PMPUQ dependence subscale, namely using mobile phones daily, being female, engaging in social networking, playing video games, shopping and viewing TV shows through the Internet, chatting and messaging, and using mobile phones for downloading-related activities.

Discussion and conclusions

Self-reported dependence on mobile phone use is influenced by frequency and specific application usage.

Open access

Including gaming disorder in the ICD-11: The need to do so from a clinical and public health perspective

Commentary on: A weak scientific basis for gaming disorder: Let us err on the side of caution (van Rooij et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf
,
Sophia Achab
,
Joël Billieux
,
Henrietta Bowden-Jones
,
Natacha Carragher
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
,
Susumu Higuchi
,
Daniel L. King
,
Karl Mann
,
Marc Potenza
,
John B. Saunders
,
Max Abbott
,
Atul Ambekar
,
Osman Tolga Aricak
,
Sawitri Assanangkornchai
,
Norharlina Bahar
,
Guilherme Borges
,
Matthias Brand
,
Elda Mei-Lo Chan
,
Thomas Chung
,
Jeff Derevensky
,
Ahmad El Kashef
,
Michael Farrell
,
Naomi A. Fineberg
,
Claudia Gandin
,
Douglas A. Gentile
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Anna E. Goudriaan
,
Marie Grall-Bronnec
,
Wei Hao
,
David C. Hodgins
,
Patrick Ip
,
Orsolya Király
,
Hae Kook Lee
,
Daria Kuss
,
Jeroen S. Lemmens
,
Jiang Long
,
Olatz Lopez-Fernandez
,
Satoko Mihara
,
Nancy M. Petry
,
Halley M. Pontes
,
Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar
,
Florian Rehbein
,
Jürgen Rehm
,
Emanuele Scafato
,
Manoi Sharma
,
Daniel Spritzer
,
Dan J. Stein
,
Philip Tam
,
Aviv Weinstein
,
Hans-Ulrich Wittchen
,
Klaus Wölfling
,
Daniele Zullino
, and
Vladimir Poznyak

The proposed introduction of gaming disorder (GD) in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) has led to a lively debate over the past year. Besides the broad support for the decision in the academic press, a recent publication by van Rooij et al. (2018) repeated the criticism raised against the inclusion of GD in ICD-11 by Aarseth et al. (2017). We argue that this group of researchers fails to recognize the clinical and public health considerations, which support the WHO perspective. It is important to recognize a range of biases that may influence this debate; in particular, the gaming industry may wish to diminish its responsibility by claiming that GD is not a public health problem, a position which maybe supported by arguments from scholars based in media psychology, computer games research, communication science, and related disciplines. However, just as with any other disease or disorder in the ICD-11, the decision whether or not to include GD is based on clinical evidence and public health needs. Therefore, we reiterate our conclusion that including GD reflects the essence of the ICD and will facilitate treatment and prevention for those who need it.

Open access