Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 29 items for

  • Author or Editor: A. Mészáros x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Transitionmetal complexes with pyrazole-based ligands

Part 21. Thermal decomposition of copper and cobalt halide complexes with 3,5-dimethyl-1-thiocarboxamidepyrazole

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
K. Mészáros Szécsényi
,
V. Leovac
,
A. Kovács
,
G. Pokol
, and
Ž. Jaćimović

Abstract  

The thermal decomposition of Cu2L2Cl4, Cu2L2Cl2, Cu2L2Br2 and Co2L2Cl4 complexes (L=3,5-dimethyl-1-thiocarboxamidepyrazole) is described. The influence of the central ion to ligand mole ratio on the course of complex formation is examined in reaction of L with copper(II) chloride. In Cu(II):L mole ratio of 1:1, in methanolic solution the reaction yields to yellow-green Cu2L2Cl4 crystals. In the filtrate a thermodynamically more stable orange Cu2L2Cl2 copper(I) complex is forming. With a Cu(II):L mole ratio of 1:2 only the latter compound is obtained. The composition and the structure of the compounds have been determined on the basis of customary methods. On the basis of FTIR spectrum of the intermediate which is forming during the thermal decomposition of Cu2L2Cl2 a decomposition mechanism is proposed.

Restricted access
Restricted access

Abstract  

Manganese(II) chloride complexes with 3,4- and 3,5-lutidine have been prepared. The crystal symmetry and cell dimensions have been calculated on the basis of powder diffraction data. The compounds were characterised also by FT-IR spectrometry. The thermal decomposition of the complexes has been studied by thermogravimetry and DSC. By plotting densities vs. molar mass, the diagram obtained has correspondence to similar observations in other solid metal-lutidine complex systems.

Restricted access

Studying fungal diversity in various environmental samples provides us with valuable knowledge about the occurrence of fungi of medical and ecological importance. Moreover, fungal composition may also characterise well the botanical and geographical source of food products, such as the origin of the spore enriched honeydew honeys. Thereby, we identified a wide spectrum of fungi found in 100 of honey samples from various geographical sources – most of them were from Italy, Greece and Hungary. Our honeydew honeys had a higher mean of the number of spore types found in them than floral honeys had. Statistically significant differences in diversity were found regarding the botanical source (p = 1.29 × 10–9) and the climatic classification (p = 2.28 × 10–2) according to Kruskal– Wallis rank sum tests. Most frequently encountered genera included ubiquitous saprotrophic species (Alternaria, Cladosporium, Epicoccum nigrum, Stemphylium), both in floral and honeydew honeys. On the other hand, certain sooty moulds like Aureobasidium pullulans, Tripospermum and Capnobotrys were rather present in different types of honeydew honeys. Metschnikowia reukaufii, the nectar inhabiting yeast reached considerably high quantities in floral honey samples. Present findings encourage further studies on quantifying the occurrence and the indicator value of specific fungal elements in honey, concerning its origin.

Restricted access
Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors:
L. Sági
,
M. Rakszegi
,
T. Spitkó
,
K. Mészáros
,
B. Németh-Kisgyörgy
,
A. Soltész
,
F. Szira
,
H. Ambrus
,
A. Mészáros
,
G. Galiba
,
A. Vágújfalvi
,
B. Barnabás
, and
L. Marton

Research with transgenic plants in the Agricultural Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is primarily related to applications that are essential for the genetic improvement of cereals. The two main directions are connected to wheat and maize breeding and are focused on improving agronomic and nutritional traits. This paper highlights experiments in these areas, which are conducted in national as well as international collaborations. The transparency of this work is ensured by the dissemination of information about approved confined field tests to the public via the internet.

Restricted access

Abstract  

We report the synthesis and the characterization (elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal methods and molar conductivity measurements) of the mixed complexes of zinc with acetate and 3-amino-5-methylpyrazole, HL 1, [Zn(OAc)2(HL1)2], or 3-amino-5-phenylpyrazole, HL 2 [Zn(OAc)2(HL2)2], or 4-acetyl-3-amino-5-methylpyrazole, HL 3, [Zn(OAc)(L3)(HL3)]2, with isothiocyanate and HL 2 [Zn(SCN)2(HL2)2], or HL 3 [Zn(SCN)2(HL3)2], and with nitrate, isothiocyanate and 3,5-dimethyl-1-carboxamidinepyrazole, HL 4 [Zn(NO3)(NCS)(HL4)2]. The thermal decomposition of the complexes is generally continuous resulting zinc oxide as end product,except [Zn(OAc)(L3)(HL3)]2 in which case a well-defined intermediate was observed between 570–620 K. On the basis of the IR spectra and elemental analysis data of the intermediate a decomposition scheme is proposed.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The synthesis of copper(II) chloride complexes with 3,5-dimethylpyrazole, 1-carboxamidine-3,5-dimethylpyrazole, 5-amino-4-carboxamide-1-phenylpyrazole and 4-acetyl-3-amino-5-methylpyrazole is described. The compounds are characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal methods, magnetic moment and molar conductivity measurements. Thermal decomposition of the dichloro-(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)-copper(II) complex results in an unstable intermediate with a stochiometric composition. The decomposition of the other compounds is continuous.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Complexes represented by the general formula [MCl2L2] (M(II)=Zn, Mn, Co) and complexes of [Cu3Cl6L4] and CuSO4L24H2O, CoSO4L23H2O, [ZnSO4L3] where L stands for 3-amino-5-methylpyrazole were prepared. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal (TG, DTG, DSC and EGA) methods and molar conductivity measurements. Except for the Zn-complexes, the magnetic susceptibilities were also determined. Thermal decomposition of the sulphato complexes of copper(II) and cobalt(II) and the chloro complexes of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) resulted in well-defined intermediates. On the basis of the IR spectra and elemental analysis data of the intermediates a decomposition scheme is proposed.

Restricted access

To check the importance of Cd-induced iron deficiency in Cd stress, symptoms of Cd stress were compared with those of iron deficiency or the combination of these two stresses. Poplar plants grown in hydroponics with Fe-EDTA (e) or Fe-citrate (c) up to four-leaf stage were treated for two weeks either by the withdrawal of iron (Fedef), or supplying 10 μM Cd(NO3)2 in the presence (Cad) or absence of an iron source (Fedef + Cad). Cadmium and iron content of leaves developing under the stress was in the order of cCad > eCad > cFedef + Cad and cCad ≈ eFedef ≈ cFedef + Cad < eCad < cFedef, respectively. Growth inhibition was much stronger in Cad than Fedef plants. The inhibitory effects on CO2 fixation, maximal and actual efficiency of PSII, chlorophyll synthesis, as well as the stimulation of the accumulation of violaxanthin cycle components and increase in non-photochemical quenching were the strongest in cFedef+Cad plants, otherwise these parameters changed parallel to the iron deficiency of leaves. Tendency of changes in thylakoid composition were similar under Cad treatments and strong iron deficiency: particularly PSI and LHCII decreased. Therefore, the development of the photosynthetic apparatus under Cd stress was mainly influenced by the Cd-induced strong iron deficiency, while leaf growth was affected primarily by the presence of Cd.

Restricted access

Facing contrasting light regimes during a vegetation season and depending on canopy position, physiological plasticity of leaves is vital for tree species to sustain the optimal ratio between the benefit of carbon assimilation and the costs of photoprotection in a given leaf. We tested the seasonal adjustment of sun and shade leaf photochemistry of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) to changing light environments by parallel investigation of the meteorological conditions, photosynthetic pigment content, PSII quantum efficiency and excitation energy quenching. Sun and shade leaves got adapted to their prevailing light regimes till mid of May. High LMA was a favourable trait in avoiding water loss and decreasing photoinhibition in both flushing and sun leaves, while low LMA optimized the light absorbing leaf surface in the lower canopy layer. Partitioning of excitation energy dissipation pathyways that is PSII photochemistry-Y(II), regulated-Y(NPQ) and non-regulated-Y(NO) quenching changed significantly during leaf ontogeny and with the position of leaves in the canopy. At 800 μmol m−2 s−1Y(II) < Y (NO) < Y (NPQ) was characteristic to early developmental stage of leaves from both canopy layers and to mature shade leaves, and Y(NO) < Y (II) < Y (NPQ) to mature sun leaves but the magnitude of Y(NPQ) and violaxanthin cycle activity differed in different canopy positions.

Restricted access