Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 27 items for

  • Author or Editor: M. Wei x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

[18F]FLT (3-deoxy-3-[18F]fluorothymidine) turned out to be a tracer particularly suitable for PET imaging of tumor proliferation because of lacking degradation in vivo. To facilitate clinical studies with [18F]FLT, we investigated two new easily accessible precursors, 2,3-anhydrothymidine (AThy) and 5-O-(4,4-dimethoxytriphenylmethyl)-2,3-anhydrothymidine (DMTThy), using a common approach for introducing the label with nucleophilic [18F]fluoride. Radiochemical yields were determined in dependence on substrate concentration, reaction time and temperature. In the case of AThy (10 mg), best FLT yields were 5.3%±1.2 (130 °C, 30 min). Labeling of DMTThy (10 mg) gave 14.3%±3.3 at 160 °C within 10 minutes. Starting with an aqueous solution of 20 GBq [18F]fluoride the new method allows to produce 1.3 GBq [18F]FLT within 90 minutes ready for intravenous injection. The new labeling procedures allow [18F]FLT synthesis without lengthy preparation of the precursor and with high reproducibility mandatory for clinical application.

Restricted access

Summary

To control the quality of Euonymus fortunei (Turcz.) Hand.-Mazz., a simple and reliable method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with photodiode array detector (PAD) was developed for both fingerprint analysis and quantitative determination. Four representative flavonoids, namely, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-7-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (I), kaempferol-3,7-O-α-dirhamnopyranoside (II), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (III), and kaempferol-3-(4″-O-acetyl)-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-α-L-r hamnopyranoside (IV) isolated from E. fortunei, were used as reference compounds and simultaneously determined by the validated HPLC method. The unique properties of the chromatographic fingerprint were validated by analyzing 11 batches of E. fortunei, E. japonicus, E. laxiflorus, E. myrianthus, and E. hamiltonianus samples. Our results revealed that the chromatographic fingerprint combined with similarity measurement could efficiently identify and distinguish E. fortunei from the other investigated Euonymus species.

Open access
Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
M. Matthews
,
I. Atkinson
,
Lubaina Presswala
,
O. Najjar
,
Nadine Gerhardstein
,
R. Wei
,
Elizabeth Rye
, and
A. Riga

Abstract  

Dielectric analysis (DEA), supported by thermogravimetric analysis (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD) and photomicrography, reveal the chiral difference in the amino acids. The acids are classified as dielectric materials based on their structure, relating chirality to the vector sum of the average dipole moment, composed of the constant optical (electronic) and infra-red (atomic) polarizabilities, as well as dipole orientation. This study encompasses 14 L-and D-amino acid isomers. Physical properties recorded include AC electrical conductivity, charge transfer complexes, melting, recrystallization, amorphous and crystalline phases, and relaxation spectra, activation energies and polarization times for the electrical charging process.

Restricted access
Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
Lubaina Presswala
,
M. Matthews
,
I. Atkinson
,
O. Najjar
,
Nadine Gerhardstein
,
J. Moran
,
R. Wei
, and
A. Riga

Abstract  

The thermal analytical study of most hydrophobic and hydrophilic D/L amino acids reveals significant hydropathy index correlation between the presence of water and crystalline amino acids. The TG derivative mass profiles for arginine and lysine (hydrophilic acids) at various time intervals of atmospheric exposure, show two distinct peaks, one between 50 and 60°C (unbound water), and one close to 100°C (bound-like water). The DSC heat-cool profiles for lysine and arginine confirmed the presence of these multiple waters with two heats of vaporization. The absence of these patterns from the TG and DSC for cysteine and phenylalanine (hydrophobic acids) further supports the conclusions.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Antifreeze protein (AFP) can lower the freezing point by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals. In this article, the thermal hysteresis activity (THA) of a plant AFP was measured with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). As is shown, when the amount of ice in the sample was less than 5% THA of this AFP reached as high as 0.35°C. The secondary structure of this AFP was studied with circular dichroism (CD). The CD spectrum from 195to 240 nm indicated a well-defined secondary structure consisting 11% α-helix, 34%antiparallel β-sheet and 55% random coil.

Restricted access
Nanopages
Authors:
Robert Vajtai
,
Sujit K. Biswas
,
Binqing Wei
,
Gouwen Meng
,
Yung Joon Jung
, and
Pulickel M. Ajayan

Single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have attracted significant interest due to their one-dimensional structure and unique electrical and mechanical properties. Among the wide variety of their potential applications most importantly they offer potential to serve as building blocks for future electronic device architectures [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Carbon nanotubes may serve as active or passive electronic elements; and as passive elements they may serve as interconnects both on short and long ranges [7, 8]. The most essential prerequisite for realizing CNT architectures is to be able to grow nanotubes at controlled sites, in predetermined orientations and to form interconnections. Significant progresses in growing aligned carbon nanotube films have been made recently with a combined approach of the floating catalyst method using pre-patterned templates and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [9, 10, 11, 12]. Recently we summarized our work on growing architectures of carbon nanotubes, which might be integrated into microelectronic circuits [13]. While the predefined growth of the above mentioned large nanotube structures is important and receives a lot of attention characterization of the product also deserves similarly high attention being a key for future applications and giving the real importance and purpose of the growth efforts. In this paper, we report some of our works, which are directed towards electrical tests on CNTs, namely high current carrying capacity; vertically organized multiwalled nanotubes showing the possible usage of highly ordered and well-shaped tubes; and characterization of singlewalled nanotube junctions.

Open access

Abstract

Renal injury is reported to have a high mortality rate. Additionally, there are several limitations to current conventional treatments that are used to manage it. This study evaluated the protective effect of hesperidin against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced kidney injury in rats. Renal injury was induced by generating I/R in kidney tissues. Rats were then treated with hesperidin at a dose of 10 or 20 mg/kg intravenously 1 day after surgery for a period of 14 days. The effect of hesperidin on renal function, serum mediators of inflammation, and levels of oxidative stress in renal tissues were observed in rat kidney tissues after I/R-induced kidney injury. Moreover, protein expression and mRNA expression in kidney tissues were determined using Western blotting and RT-PCR. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was done for histopathological observation of kidney tissues. The data suggest that the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine in the serum of hesperidin-treated rats were lower than in the I/R group. Treatment with hesperidin also ameliorated the altered level of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in I/R-induced renal-injured rats. The expression of p-IκBα, caspase-3, NF-κB p65, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) protein, TLR-4 mRNA, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was significantly reduced in the renal tissues of hesperidin-treated rats. Histopathological findings also revealed that treatment with hesperidin attenuated the renal injury in I/R kidney-injured rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that hesperidin protects against renal injury induced by I/R by involving TLR-4/NF-κB/iNOS signaling.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
M. Misdaq
,
G. Blondiaux
,
N. Bordes
,
A. Giovagnoli
,
M. Valladon
,
L. Wei
,
M. Hage Ali
,
C. Maggiore
, and
J. Debrun

Abstract  

Several examples of improvements or of new developments in the field of charged particle activation analysis applied to the study of semiconductors are described: determination of carbon at the sub-ppb level in GaAs, use of 20 to 30 MeV protons for trace analysis in InP, study of radioactivation with 12 MeV tritons, and use of channeling to study the lattice location of carbon atoms at trace level in GaAlAs.

Restricted access

In this study, we employed electron microscopy to investigate the cytogenetic and embryologic mechanisms of parthenogenesis induced in the 1BL/1RS male sterile lines of wheat. Analysis of the root tips and acid polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that all of the male sterile lines and their maintainer lines were 1BL/1RS translocation lines, whereas the restorer lines were non-1BL/1RS translocation lines. Furthermore, the chromosomes of 1BL/1RS wheat lines with T. aestivum cytoplasm and Aegilops cytoplasm (include Ae. kotschyi, Ae. ventricosa, Ae. variabilis) paired abnormally at different rates during meiotic metaphase I (MMI). The translocated segment size of the 1RS chromosome and the specific nuclear–alloplasm interaction impaired the pairing of homologous chromosome in the background of the specific Aegilops cytoplasm at MMI. In addition, the frequency of abnormal chromosomal pairing was directly affected by the frequency of haploid production induced by parthenogenesis. The results of this study provide significant insights into the mechanism of parthenogenesis, which is probably due to the abnormal fertilization of synergid cells in alloplasmic 1BL/1RS wheat.

Restricted access