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Abstract  

Thermal decomposition of lithium tris (malonato) ferrate (III) tetrahydrate i.e. Li3[Fe(CH2C2O4)3].4H2O has been studied in the temperature range of 353–873 K in static air atmosphere using Mössbauer, infrared spectroscopy and nonisothermal techniques (TG-DTG-DTA). The anhydrous complex decomposed into ferric oxide of varying particle sizes and alkali metal malonates/carbonates in succesive stages. Fimally a solid state reaction between -Fe2O3 and alkali metal carbonate gives fine particles of lithium ferrite (LiFeO2) at a temperature lower than for oxalate precursor and for ceramic method.

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Solid state reactivity of organic compounds with inorganic compounds II.

Reactions of cobalt acetate with aniline hydrobromides

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
P. Bassi
,
G. Chopra
, and
R. Prasher

Cobalt acetate reacts with aniline, 2-, 3- and 4-chloroanilinehydrobromides in the solid state to give the products CoBr2. 2 amine in which the acetate is replaced by bromide and the amine gets attached to the metal in a concerted step. The products have been identified by elemental, spectral and thermoanalytical methods. The kinetics of these reactions have been studied by the mass loss method. The values of energy of activation are 142.0, 41.0, 77.0 and 71.4 kJ mol−1. The greater reactivity of 2-chloro is due to ortho effect. An intermediate adduct (RNH3)2(Co(CH3COO)2Br2) has also been characterized.

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Abstract  

Solid state photolysis of alkaline earth tris/malonato/ferrates/III/, i.e., M3[Fe(CH2C2O4)3]2.xH2O /M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba/ has been investigated employing Mössbauer, infrared and reflectance spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were irradiated for 400 h using a medium pressure mercury vapour lamp of 250 Watts. Photoreduction led to the formation of M[FeII(CH2C2O4)2(H2O)2]. The extent of photoreduction showed the following order: Ca>Sr>Mg>Ba. The results have been compared with those of analogous alkaline earth tris/oxalato/ferrates/III/.

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The thermal dehydration and decomposition of copper(II) phthalate monohydrate was studied by isothermal and non-isothermal methods. The decomposition process consisted of three steps: two steps of dehydration and the third of decomposition. The kinetics of isothermal dehydration reactions follow (i) a unimolecular law up to the formation of copper(II) phthalate hemihydrate, and (ii) a phase boundary model giving anhydrous copper(II) phthalate, while the kinetics of isothermal decomposition reaction comply with the Erofeev-Avrami equation, [−ln(1−α)]1/n =Kt+C. The energies of activation for the formation of the decomposition products were calculated. The decomposition products were characterized by elemental analysis, photomicrographic observations, infrared and reflectance spectra and X-ray powder diffraction data.

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The thermal decomposition of iron(III) citrate pentahydrate, Fe(C6H5O7) · 5 H2O, has been investigated at different temperatures in air using Mössbauer spectroscopy, nonisothermal techniques (DTA-TG) and X-ray diffraction. The reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) takes place at 553 K. At higher temperature the formation of α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 as the ultimate thermal decomposition products has been confirmed.

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8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) and uranyl acetate react in the solid state in 1∶3 stoichiometry to give UO2(C9H6NO)2·C9H6NOH. This reaction is diffusion controlled with an activation energy of 44.4 kJ mol−1. The reaction occurs by the surface migration of 8-hydroxyquinoline, which penetrates the product lattice to react with uranyl acetate. The isothermal decomposition of the solution phase product UO2Q2·HQ (Q=C9H6NO) obeys the Prout-Tompkins equation with an energy of activation of 53.3 kJ mol−1.

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Abstract  

The solid state reactions between ferrous oxalate dihydrate i.e. FeC2O4.2H2O and unsubstituted/ substituted aniline hydrochlorides have been studied. The products [FeCl/oxH/. AN-Cl] have been characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. The kinetic studies for the reactions have been performed at various temperatures for fixed particle sizes at constant compaction. The following order of reactivity has been observed: unsubstituted > p-substituted > m-substituted o-substituted.

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