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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: T. Ohyama, M. Yanaga, T. Yoshida, H. Maetsu, M. Noguchi, H. Suganuma, T. Omori, R. Hirunuma, and S. Enomoto

Abstract  

A multitracer technique was used to obtain uptake rates of essential trace elements in various organs and tissues in Zn-deficient mice. A multitracer solution, containing more than 20 radioisotopes, was injected intraperitoneally into Zn-deficient state mice and control ones. Uptake rates of the radioisotopes were compared with concentrations of trace elements determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in order to study a specific metabolism of Zn and other essential trace elements, such as Mn, Co, Se, Rb, and Sr. The result suggests that Zn is supplied from bone to other organs and tissues and an increase in Co concentration in all organs and tissues depends on its chemical form, under the Z-deficient state.

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Abstract

In the aluminum industries, there are several steps involved in processing since the extraction of bauxite to obtain the final product (Al). During the development of these, various steps generated wastes. One of them, from the electrostatic filter of the calcination step of the Bayer process is a very fine black powder, rich in alumina (Al2O3) that does not meet industry specifications, and it is discarded in the industry yard. Alumina is a noble material and has high commercial value. This black powder has great prospects for recovery, recycling, and future applications. Therefore, it is important to perform characterization of tailings and to do that we have used XRD, SEM, EDS, FTIR, Raman, and thermal analysis.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: M. I. Yoshida, M. A. Oliveira, E. C. L. Gomes, W. N. Mussel, W. V. Castro, and C. D. V. Soares

Abstract

Thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are useful techniques that have been successfully applied in the pharmaceutical industry to reveal important information regarding the physicochemical properties of drug and excipient molecules such as polymorphism, stability, purity, and formulation compatibility among others. In this study, lovastatin was studied by TG, DSC, and other techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Lovastatin showed melting point at 445 K and thermal stability up to 535 K. It presented morphological polymorphism, which in the drug has the same unit cell, but with different crystal habits. Preservative excipient butylhydroxyanisole (BHA) causes amorphization of lovastatin crystallites and, therefore is incompatible with lovastatin. Degradation by hydrolysis was observed under neutral, acid, and basic conditions. The active degradation product, lovastatin hydroxyacid, was obtained after neutral and basic hydrolysis.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: J. C. D'Ars de Figueiredo Jr., V. M. De Bellis, M. I. Yoshida, V. Freitas Cunha Lins, and L. A. Cruz Souza
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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: C. Mori, T. Suzuki, S. Koido, A. Uritani, H. Miyahara, K. Yanagida, Y. Wu, K. Nishizawa, M. Yoshida, F. Takahashi, and J. Miyahara

Abstract  

Distribution images of natural radioactivity in natural materials such as vegetables were obtained by using Imaging Plate. In such cases, it is necessary to reduce background radiation intensity by one order or more. Graded shielding is very important. Especially, the innermost surface of a shielding box should be covered with acrylic resin plate. We obtained natural radioactivity distribution images of vegetables, sea food, meat etc. Mostly -rays emitted from40K print the radioactivity distribution image. Comparison between -ray intensity of KCl solution measured with HPGe detector and that of natural material specimen gave the radioactivity around 0.060.4 Bq/g depending on the kind and the part of specimens.

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