Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 50 items for

  • Author or Editor: I. Horváth x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
N. Eszes
,
A. Bohács
,
Á. Cseh
,
G. Toldi
,
A. Bikov
,
I. Ivancsó
,
V. Müller
,
I. Horváth
,
J. Rigó
,
B. Vásárhelyi
,
Gy Losonczy
, and
Lilla Tamási

Asthmatic inflammation during pregnancy poses a risk for maternal and fetal morbidities. Circulating T cell immune phenotype is known to correlate with airway inflammation (detectable by fractional concentration of nitric oxide present in exhaled breath (FENO)) in non-pregnant allergic asthmatics. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of peripheral T cell phenotype to FENO and clinical variables of asthma during pregnancy.We examined 22 pregnant women with allergic asthma in the 2nd/3rd trimester. The prevalence of Th1, Th2, regulatory T (Treg) and natural killer (NK) cell subsets was identified with flow cytometry using cell-specific markers. FENO, Asthma Control Test (ACT) total score and lung function were evaluated.Peripheral blood Th1, Th2, Treg, and NK cell prevalence were not significantly correlated to airway inflammation assessed by FENO in asthmatic pregnant women (all cells p > 0.05; study power > 75%). However, an inverse correlation was detected between Th2 cell prevalence and ACT total scores (p = 0.03) in asthmatic pregnancy.Blunted relationship between T cell profile and airway inflammation may be the result of pregnancy induced immune tolerance in asthmatic pregnancy. On the other hand, increased Th2 response impairs disease control that supports direct relationship between symptoms and cellular mechanisms of asthma during pregnancy.

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
J. Stark
,
Zs Tulassay
,
G. Lengyel
,
D. Szombath
,
B. Székács
,
I. Ádler
,
I. Marczell
,
P. Nagy-Répas
,
E. Dinya
,
K. Rácz
,
G. Békési
, and
Iván Horváth

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
F. Budán
,
I. Szabó
,
Á. Ember
,
Ő. Horváth
,
L. Illényi
,
Zs. Orsós
,
A. Blasio
,
I. Magda
,
T. Gracza
,
P. Perjési
,
T. Dávid
,
G. Nowrasteh
, and
I. Ember

The combined effect of surgical treatment and consumption of so-called “CoD™ tea” (containing Uncaria guianensis, U. tomentosa and Tabebuia avellanedae) on expression of c-myc, Ha-ras, Bcl-2, Ki-ras and p53 key onco/suppressor genes, the carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9) and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) tumour markers in blood samples of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated. Expression of genes followed the effect of the surgical treatment combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment; this may predict the outcome of carcinoma. Moreover their expressions might show possible additional effect of supportive therapy, e.g. CoD™ consumption. The antioxidant capacity of blood was also examined. Blood samples were taken at the day of, and one week, 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgical treatment. During that period patients got 0.25 l standard portion of CoD™ tea three times a day. The surgical treatment and neoadjuvant therapy were able to suppress the expression of c-myc, Ha-ras, Bcl-2, Ki-ras, p53 genes up to the twelfth month. Moreover, CoD™ tea together with conventional treatment caused a strong decrease in the expression of c-myc and Ha-ras oncogenes in comparison to the non-consumer control.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Nadja Fodor
,
S. K. Dube
,
I. Fodor
,
E. Horváth
,
Edith Nagy
,
V. N. Vakharia
, and
Altancsimeg Rencendorsh

Direct DNA inoculations were used to determine the efficacy of gene immunisation of chickens to elicit protective immune responses against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Thevp2 gene of IBDV strains GP40 and D78, and thevp2-vp4-vp3 encoding segment of strain D78 were cloned in an expression vector which consisted of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early enhancer and promoter, adenovirus tripartite leader sequences and SV40 polyadenylation signal. For purification of vaccine-quality plasmid DNA fromE. coli, an effective method was developed. Chickens were vaccinated by inoculation of DNA by two routes (intramuscular and intraperitoneal). Two weeks later, chickens were boosted with DNA, and at 2 weeks post-boost, they were challenged with virulent IBDV strain. Low to undetectable levels of IBDV-specific antibodies and no protection were observed with DNA encoding VP2. However, plasmids encoding VP2-VP4-VP3 induced IBDV-specific antibodies and protection in the chickens. DNA immunisation opens a new approach to the development of gene vaccines for chickens against infectious diseases.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
J. Németh
,
B. Jakab
,
R. Józsa
,
T. Hollósy
,
A. Tamás
,
A. Lubics
,
I. Lengvári
,
P. Kiss
,
Zs. Oberritter
,
B. Horváth
,
Z. Szilvássy
, and
D. Reglődi

Abstract  

Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely distributed neuropeptide that has two molecular forms with 38 and 27 amino acid residues. The aim of the present study was to develop a new, highly specific PACAP-27 assay to investigate the quantitative distribution of PACAP-27 in the central nervous system of various vertebrate species applying the same technical and experimental conditions. Our results show that the antiserum used turned to be PACAP-27 specific. The average ID50 value was 51.5±3.6 fmol/ml and the detection limit was 2 fmol/ml. PACAP-27 immunoreactivity was present in the examined brain areas, with highest concentration in the rat diencephalon and telencephalon. Swine and pigeon brain also contained significant amount of PACAP-27. Our results confirm the previously described data showing that PACAP-38 is the dominant form of PACAP in vertebrates, since PACAP-38 levels exceeded those of PACAP-27 in all examined brain areas. Furthermore, our study describes for the first time, the comparative quantitative distribution of PACAP-27 and-38 in the swine and pigeon brain.

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
K. Csanaky
,
D. Reglődi
,
E. Bánki
,
I. Tarcai
,
L. Márk
,
Zs Helyes
,
T. Ertl
,
J. Gyarmati
,
K. Horváth
,
L. Sántik
, and
Andrea Tamás

Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with special importance in reproductive and developmental processes. PACAP is found in two bioactive forms: PACAP27 and PACAP38. Recently, we have described that PACAP38 is present in high levels in the milk of human and ruminant animals. Breastfeeding is of utmost importance in proper nutrition of the newborn, but artificial nursing with infant formulas is necessary when breastfeeding is not available. Composition of the breast milk varies during the whole period of nursing and it shows differences at the beginning (foremilk) and the end of an actual suckling (hindmilk). The aim of this study was to investigate PACAP38-like immunoreactivity (PACAP38-LI) in different milk and infant formula samples by radioimmunoassay and to prove the presence of PACAP38 in the infant formula by mass spectrometry. We found similar PACAP38-LI in human mature foremilk and hindmilk samples, in the fresh and pasteurized cow milk and also in formulas. However, we found significantly higher PACAP38-LI in the hypoantigenic formula undergoing extensive hydrolysis compared to the non-hypoantigenic ones. Our results suggest that PACAP38 is relatively stable in the milk and it can withstand the manufacturing processes.

Restricted access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
K. Shanava
,
Sz. Horváth
,
F. Karl-Hermann
,
Sz. Jávor
,
I. Takács
,
B. Balatonyi
,
S. Ferencz
,
A. Ferencz
,
E. Rőth
, and
György Wéber

Abstract

Introduction:The Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) is an abdominal operation carried out with flexible endoscopic instruments and their advanced versions via natural orifices. The NOTES causes theoretically less pain, operative stress, shorter hospitalization, quicker recovery and it is scarless. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of transgastric small bowel resection. Materials and methods: Seven domestic pigs were investigated and entered the study; body weight 25 kg in average. General anesthesia was performed. One trocar was used for laparoscopic observations during gastrotomy and transgastric penetration with the gastroscope, later for assistance with a grasper for manipulation of the bowel loops and for the application of the linear stapling device. Then the needle knife was used to complete a 1.5 cm long incision in the gastric wall. The gastroscope was advanced into the peritoneal cavity and a small bowel loop was identified and elevated with a flexible grasper. Through the second channel of the scope a coag grasper was used to dissect the mesentery. Then a linear stapler was inserted through the assisting trocar and the resection was performed. Afterwards the bowel ends were opened with the needle knife and the stapler was reinserted for a side-to-side anastomosis. The specimen was removed via the stomach. Gastric closure was completed by laparoscopic mini-instruments through the stapler-port. All special events and all problems were prospectively documented. Follow-up was performed over 2 weeks and body weight was recorded. Then a laparoscopy was performed to document adhesions or abscess formation. Finally the animals were sacrificed to evaluate further evidence of infection or adhesions. Results: The operations were carried without complications, there was no case of letal outcome. On the 12th day the abdominal laparoscopic revision was carried out, after the revision in one case adhesion could be detected, no other kinds of complications were noticed. Conclusion: According to our results, the transgastric small bowel resection is a safe procedure, but further special instruments are needed. These experimental procedures should be evaluated carefully and critically in clinical practice.

Restricted access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Szaniszló Z. Jávor
,
K. Shanava
,
E. Hocsák
,
M. Kürthy
,
J. Lantos
,
B. Borsiczky
,
I. Takács
,
Sz. Horváth
,
B. Balatonyi
,
S. Ferencz
,
A. Ferencz
,
E. Rőth
, and
Gy. Wéber

Abstract

Increased intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy leads to hypoxia due to reduced blood flow. Aim of our study was to investigate whether preconditioning can reduce this negative effect of the pneumoperitoneum. Fifty female Wistar rats were used, divided into 5 groups. I: Sham operation (Sham), II: conventional pneumoperitoneum (PP), III: transvaginal pneumoperitoneum (TV), IV: preconditioning for 2.5 minutes in two cycles (Pre 2.5), V: preconditioning for 5 minutes (Pre 5). Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), sulfhydrylgroup (SH-) concentrations, superoxide-dismutase (SOD) and mieloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and anti-apoptotic pathway marker p-AKT level and inflammatory cytokine TNF-α were measured. SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased in PP and TV groups comparing to Sham and preconditioning groups. MPO activity was decreased also in PP and TV groups comparing to the Sham group but in the preconditioning groups it has remained high. MDA concentration in plasma was increased in PP and TV groups comparing to Sham and preconditioning groups. There was no difference in the case of blood MDA and SH-concentrations between groups. Anti-apoptotic pathway marker p-AKT level was decreased in the TV group comparing to the sham and preconditioning groups. TNF-α level was increased in TV and preconditioning groups compared to the sham group. According to the results preconditioning can reduce negative effects of pneumoperitoneum.

Restricted access
Cereal Research Communications
Authors:
T. Tóth
,
T. Németh
,
A. Bidló
,
F. Dér
,
M. Fekete
,
T. Fábián
,
Z. Gaál
,
B. Heil
,
T. Hermann
,
E. Horváth
,
G. Kovács
,
A. Makó
,
F. Máté
,
K. Mészáros
,
Z. Patocskai
,
F. Speiser
,
I. Szűcs
,
G. Tóth
,
Gy. Várallyay
,
J. Vass
, and
Sz. Vinogradov
Restricted access
Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
Cs. Molnár
,
Zs. Molnár
,
Z. Barina
,
N. Bauer
,
M. Biró
,
L. Bodonczi
,
A. Csathó
,
J. Csiky
,
J. Deák
,
G. Fekete
,
K. Harmos
,
A. Horváth
,
I. Isépy
,
M. Juhász
,
J. Kállayné Szerényi
,
G. Király
,
G. Magos
,
A. Máté
,
A. Mesterházy
,
A. Molnár
,
J. Nagy
,
M. Óvári
,
D. Purger
,
D. Schmidt
,
G. Sramkó
,
V. Szénási
,
F. Szmorad
,
Gy. Szollát
,
T. Tóth
,
T. Vidra
, and
V. Virók

The first version of the map of the Hungarian vegetation-based landscape regions were prepared at the scale of 1: 200,000 (1 km or higher resolution). The primary goal of the map was to provide an exact background for the presentation and evaluation of the data of the MÉTA database. Secondly, we intended to give an up-to-date and detailed vegetation-based division of Hungary with a comprehensive nomenclature of the regions. Regions were primarily defined on the basis of their present zonal vegetation, or their dominant extrazonal or edaphic vegetation. Where this was not possible, abiotic factors that influence the potential vegetation, the flora were taken into consideration, thus, political and economical factors were ignored. All region borders were defined by local expert botanists, mainly based on their field knowledge. The map differs in many features from the currently used, country-wide, flora-or geography-based divisions in many features. We consider our map to be temporary (i.e. a work map), and we plan to refine and improve it after 5 years of testing.

Restricted access