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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
P. Török
,
T. Miglécz
,
O. Valkó
,
K. Tóth
,
A. Kelemen
,
Á.-J. Albert
,
G. Matus
,
A. Molnár V
,
E. Ruprecht
,
L. Papp
,
B. Deák
,
O. Horváth
,
A. Takács
,
B. Hüse
, and
B. Tóthmérész

In the present paper we report original thousand-seed weight data for the flora of the Pannonian Basin. Our goal was to demonstrate the usefulness of seed weight databases by analysing seed weight data in relation to social behaviour types and life forms. We specifically asked the following questions: (i) how the seed weights are related to social behaviour type categories; (ii) how the life form of the species influences seed weight differences between respective social behaviour types? Own weight measurements are provided for 1,405 taxa; and for 187 taxa we published seed weight data for the first time: these were mostly endemics, orchids and/or species with Pontic, Caspian or continental distribution. Several taxonomic or functional groups are underrepresented in our database, like aquatic plants, rare arable weeds and sub-Mediterranean species. Problematic taxa, some difficult-to-harvest species or species with low seed production and cultivated adventives are also underrepresented. We found that the plant strategies expressed by social behaviour types were significantly different in terms of seed weights. The lowest seed weight scores were found for natural pioneers, whereas the highest ones were found for adventives and introduced cultivated plants. Short-lived herbaceous species had significantly higher seed weight scores than herbaceous perennials. No significant differences were found between specialists and generalists within the stress tolerant group. We found that short-lived graminoids possess heavier seeds than perennial graminoids, perennial and annual forbs. Naturalness scores were negatively correlated with seed weights. Our findings showed that seed collections and databases are not only for storing plant material and seed weight data, but can be effectively used for understanding ecological trends and testing plant trait-based hypotheses. Even the identified gaps underline the necessity of further seed collection and measurements.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
Cs. Molnár
,
Zs. Molnár
,
Z. Barina
,
N. Bauer
,
M. Biró
,
L. Bodonczi
,
A. Csathó
,
J. Csiky
,
J. Deák
,
G. Fekete
,
K. Harmos
,
A. Horváth
,
I. Isépy
,
M. Juhász
,
J. Kállayné Szerényi
,
G. Király
,
G. Magos
,
A. Máté
,
A. Mesterházy
,
A. Molnár
,
J. Nagy
,
M. Óvári
,
D. Purger
,
D. Schmidt
,
G. Sramkó
,
V. Szénási
,
F. Szmorad
,
Gy. Szollát
,
T. Tóth
,
T. Vidra
, and
V. Virók

The first version of the map of the Hungarian vegetation-based landscape regions were prepared at the scale of 1: 200,000 (1 km or higher resolution). The primary goal of the map was to provide an exact background for the presentation and evaluation of the data of the MÉTA database. Secondly, we intended to give an up-to-date and detailed vegetation-based division of Hungary with a comprehensive nomenclature of the regions. Regions were primarily defined on the basis of their present zonal vegetation, or their dominant extrazonal or edaphic vegetation. Where this was not possible, abiotic factors that influence the potential vegetation, the flora were taken into consideration, thus, political and economical factors were ignored. All region borders were defined by local expert botanists, mainly based on their field knowledge. The map differs in many features from the currently used, country-wide, flora-or geography-based divisions in many features. We consider our map to be temporary (i.e. a work map), and we plan to refine and improve it after 5 years of testing.

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