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  • Author or Editor: A. Goodenough x
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The study of invasion ecology usually focuses on the negative impacts of alien species, while potential positive impacts are often overlooked. Understanding of biotic interactions may thus be skewed towards the negative, which could have important implications for ecological management and conservation. This article provides a comprehensive review of all types of impacts, both beneficial and detrimental, that can result from species translocation. An extensive review of literature on species introductions to terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems and involving a wide range of taxa (including microorganisms, parasites, plants, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, fish and Crustacea) showed that, despite limited research into facilitative alien-native interactions, such interactions occur surprisingly frequently. Examples were found of introduced species acting as hosts, food sources, pollinators or seed dispersers for native species, as well as providing herbivory, predatory or parasite release. However, research showed that numerous negative interactions also occurred and combination impacts (when an alien benefits some natives but disadvantages others) were common. In many cases, the traditional view that biological invasions constitute a significant threat to native biota is both accurate and appropriate. Efforts to prevent translocation and control non-native species can be vital. However, the “native good, alien bad” maxim does not convey the complexity of invasion ecology: alien species do not axiomatically pose a threat to native biota. In order to move understanding of invasion ecology forward and to develop maximally-effective management strategies, facilitative alien-native interactions need to be added into the alien species debate.

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There are several community-based bioindicator systems that use species presence or abundance data as proxies for environmental variables. One example is the Ellenberg system, whereby vegetation data are used to estimate environmental soil conditions. Despite widespread use of Ellenberg values in ecological research, the correlation between bioindicated values and actual values is often an implicit assumption rather than based on empirical evidence. Here, we correlate unadjusted and UK-adjusted Ellenberg values for soil moisture, pH, and nitrate in relation to direct environmental measures for 50 woodland sites in the UK, which were subject to repeat sampling. Our results show the accuracy of Ellenberg values is parameter specific; pH values were a good proxy for direct environmental measures but this was not true for soil moisture, when relationships were weak and non-significant. For nitrates, there were important seasonal differences, with a strong positive logarithmic relationship in the spring but a non-significant (and negative) correlation in summer. The UK-adjusted values were better than, or equivalent to, Ellenberg’s original ones, which had been quantified originally for Central Europe, in all cases. Somewhat surprisingly, unweighted values correlated with direct environmental measures better than did abundance-weighted ones. This suggests that the presence of rare plants can be highly important in accurate quantification of soil parameters and we recommend using an unweighted approach. However, site profiles created only using rare plants were inferior to profiles based on the whole plant community and thus cannot be used in isolation. We conclude that, for pH and nitrates, the Ellenberg system provides a useful estimate of actual conditions, but recalibration of moisture values should be considered along with the effect of seasonality on the efficacy of the system.

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The influence of edge proximity on woodland plants is a well-established research area, yet the influence of dual edge exposure has rarely been investigated. This novel research aims to establish whether proximity to two edges has any additive influence on Ancient Woodland Indicator (AWI) species presence relative to proximity to a single edge. Several AWI species are threatened and thus specific conservation priorities, while Ancient Semi-Natural Woodland (ASNW) itself is often highly fragmented: almost half of remnant patches are less than 5 ha, which increases the potential for dual edge effects. Here, systematic mapping of herbaceous AWI species was conducted in 310 vegetation plots in two formerly-connected ASNW fragments in South-West England. Linear regression modelling revealed that distance to nearest edge and distance to second nearest edge were both univariately positively correlated with AWI species richness. After distance from nearest edge was entered into a multivariate model first, distance from second edge was entered in a second optional step after meeting stepwise criteria. The resultant multivariate model was more significant, and explained more variance, than either variable in isolation, indicating an additive effect of dual edge exposure. Likewise, binary logistic regression modelling showed presence of individual AWI species (Anemone nemorosa, Hyacinthoides non-scripta, Lamiastrum galaeobdolon and Paris quadrifolia) was significantly related not only to distance from the nearest and second nearest edges in isolation, but significantly more strongly by the additive effect of distance from both edges in a single model. We discuss the implications of these findings from community ecology and conservation perspectives.

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