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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Csaba Vágvölgyi, László Manczinger, Judit Krisch, Miklós Takó, and Tamás Papp
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Cellulolytic, lipolytic and proteolytic enzyme production of zygomycetes Mucor corticolus, Rhizomucor miehei, Gilbertella persicaria and Rhizopus niveus were investigated using agro-industrial wastes as substrates. Solid-state cultures were carried out on untreated corn residues (stalk and leaf) as single substrate (SSF1) or corn residues and wheat bran in mixed fermentation (SSF2). Rapid production of endoglucanase (CMCase) was observed with maximal activity reaching after about 48-h fermentation, while cellobiohydrolase (CBH) and β-glucosidase enzymes generally had their peak after 72-h incubation. Highest filter paper degrading (FPase), CMCase, CBH and β-glucosidase activities obtained were (U g−1 dss) 17.3, 74.1, 12.2 and 158.3, for R. miehei, G. persicaria, M. corticolus and Rh. niveus, respectively. M. corticolus proved to be the best lipolytic enzyme producer in SSF1 presenting 447.6 U g−1 dss yield, while R. miehei showed 517.7 U g−1 dss activity in SSF2. Rh. niveus exhibited significantly greater protease production than the other strains. Suc-AAPF-pNA hydrolyzing activities of this strain were 1.1 and 1.96 U g−1 dss in SSF1 and SSF2, respectively. We conclude that the used corn stalk and leaf residues could potentially be applicable as strong inducers for cellulase and lipase production by Mucoromycotina fungi.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Györgyi Horváth, Julianna Török Jenei, Csaba Vágvölgyi, Andrea Böszörményi, and Judit Krisch

Essential oils (EOs) can be used as alternative or complementary antifungal agents against human pathogenic moulds and yeasts. To reduce the effective dose of antimicrobial agents, EOs are combined which can lead to synergistic or additive effect. In this study the anti-yeast and anti-mould activities of selected EOs were investigated, alone and in combinations, against clinical isolates of Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. terreus, Rhizopus microsporus, Fusarium solani and Lichtheimia corymbifera. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for the EOs of cinnamon, citronella, clove, spearmint and thyme. To investigate the combination effect of the EOs, fractional inhibitory concentrations (FICs) were defined by the checkerboard method and the type of interaction was determined by the FIC index (FICI). FIC index below 0.5 was considered as synergism and between 0.5 and 1 as additive effect. Strongest antifungal activity was showed by thyme EO with MIC values below 1.0 mg/ml. Combination of EOs resulted in additive or indifferent effect, with occasional “borderline synergism”. The best combination was cinnamon with clove leading to additive effect in all cases.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Ilona Pfeiffer, Zoltán Farkas, Judit Kucsera, Muthusamy Chandrasekaran, Shine Kadaikunnan, Naiyf S. Alharbi, and Csaba Vágvölgyi

The genetic background of mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in Candida albicans was studied by physical and functional mapping of four haplotypes identified recently in a hospital-population. The restriction patterns revealed considerable differences; however, the size of the mitochondrial DNA did not vary significantly. Sequence data demonstrated that size differences arose by short deletions, while restriction fragment length polymorphisms are caused by nucleotide substitutions in single sites. Gene rearrangement could not be detected; nevertheless, the coincidence of nucleotide substitution pattern in the inverted repeat region suggested the occurrence of homologue recombination.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Mónika Homa, Kinga Hegedűs, Ádám Fülöp, Vanessza Wolfárt, Shine Kadaikunnan, Jamal M. Khaled, Naiyf S. Alharbi, Csaba Vágvölgyi, and László Galgóczy

Despite the current therapeutic options, filamentous fungal infections are associated with high mortality rate especially in immunocompromised patients. In order to find a new potential therapeutic approach, the in vitro inhibitory effect of two antiarrhythmic agents, diltiazem and verapamil hydrochloride were tested against different clinical isolates of ascomycetous and mucoralean filamentous fungi. The in vitro combinations of these non-antifungal drugs with azole and polyene antifungal agents were also examined. Susceptibility tests were carried out using the broth microdilution method according to the instructions of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute document M38-A2. Checkerboard microdilution assay was used to assess the interactions between antifungal and non-antifungal drugs. Compared to antifungal agents, diltiazem and verapamil hydrochloride exerted a relatively low antifungal activity with high minimal inhibitory concentration values (853–2731 μg/ml). Although in combination they could increase the antifungal activity of amphotericin B, itraconazole and voriconazole. Indifferent and synergistic interactions were registered in 33 and 17 cases, respectively. Antagonistic interactions were not revealed between the investigated compounds. However, the observed high MICs suggest that these agents could not be considered as alternative systemic antifungal agents.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Erika-Beáta Kerekes, Anita Vidács, Julianna Jenei Török, Csilla Gömöri, Tamás Petkovits, Muthusamy Chandrasekaran, Shine Kadaikunnan, Naiyf S. Alharbi, Csaba Vágvölgyi, and Judit Krisch

The anti-listerial effect of marjoram, thyme essential oils (EOs) and thymol on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated chicken breast fillets was investigated. Before inoculation the fillets were pretreated by washing or not under running tap water. Inoculated samples were kept at 6 °C for 24 h to allow the growth of L. monocytogenes. After this, the fillets were put in marinating solutions containing salt (5%) and EOs or thymol in MIC/2 concentration established in vitro. Total germ count (TGC) and L. monocytogenes count was monitored on the meat surface and in the marinating solutions following 24 and 48 h storage at 6 °C. Thyme and thymol reduced significantly Listeria cell count (1–3 log CFU) in both samples. They also gave good flavour to the fried meat. The doses of EOs used were optimal for antimicrobial efficiency and had a pleasant flavour effect. Washing was not efficient in reducing total germ count.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Parisa Rahimi Tamandegani, Doustmorad Zafari, Tamás Marik, András Szekeres, Csaba Vágvölgyi, and László Kredics

Five Iranian Trichoderma isolates from species T. viride, T. viridescens, T. asperellum, T. longibrachiatum and T. citrinoviride — selected from the Fungal Collection of the Bu Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran — were investigated for their peptaibol production. All examined isolates showed remarkable antibacterial activities during the screening of their extracts for peptaibol content with a Micrococcus luteus test culture. HPLC-ESI-IT MS was used for identification and elucidation of the amino acid sequences of peptaibols. The detected peptaibol compounds contain 20 or 18 amino acid residues and belong to the trichobrachin and trichotoxin groups of peptaibols, respectively. T. longibrachiatum and T. citrinoviride produced trichobrachins, while trichotoxins could be detected in T. viride, T. viridescens and T. asperellum. Out of 37 sequences detetermined, 26 proved to be new, yet undescribed compounds, while others were identified as previously reported trichotoxins (trichotoxin A-50s and T5D2) and trichobrachins (longibrachins AI, AII, AIII, BII and BIII). Compounds within the two groups of detected peptaibols differed from each other only by a single or just a few amino acid changes.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Nikolett Baranyi, Daniela Jakšić Despot, Andrea Palágyi, Noémi Kiss, Sándor Kocsubé, András Szekeres, Anita Kecskeméti, Ottó Bencsik, Csaba Vágvölgyi, Maja Šegvić Klarić, and János Varga

The occurrence of potential aflatoxin producing fungi was examined in various agricultural products and indoor air in Central European countries including Hungary, Serbia and Croatia. For species identification, both morphological and sequence based methods were applied. Aspergillus flavus was detected in several samples including maize, cheese, nuts, spices and indoor air, and several isolates were able to produce aflatoxins. Besides, three other species of Aspergillus section Flavi, A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus were also isolated from cheese, maize and indoor air, respectively. This is the first report on the occurrence of A. nomius and A. pseudonomius in Central Europe. All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates were able to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The A. nomius isolate came from cheese produced very high amounts of aflatoxins (above 1 mg ml–1). All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates produced much higher amounts of aflatoxin G1 then aflatoxin B1. Further studies are in progress to examine the occurrence of producers of these highly carcinogenic mycotoxins in agricultural products and indoor air in Central Europe.

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