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This study aimed to assess the role of H2S in homocysteine-induced cardiodynamic effects in the isolated rat heart. The hearts were retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique. The maximum and minimum rates of pressure in the left ventricle (dp/dt max, dp/dt min), systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures (SLVP, DLVP), heart rate (HR), and coronary flow (CF) were measured. A spectrophotometrical method was used to measure the following oxidative stress markers: index of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), nitrite level (NO2 ), superoxide anion radicals (O2 •−), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations. The administration of 10 µmol/l DL-homocysteine (DL-Hcy) alone decreased dp/dt max, SLVP, and CF but did not change any oxidative stress parameters. The administration of 10 µmol/l DL-propargylglycine (DL-PAG) decreased all cardiodynamic parameters and increased the concentration of O2 •−. The co-administration of DL-Hcy and DL-PAG induced a significant decrease in all estimated cardiodynamic parameters and decreased the concentration of NO2 and O2 •− but increased the levels of TBARS and H2O2. Homocysteine shows a lower pro-oxidative effect in the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which indicates a potential anti-oxidative capacity of H2S.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
V. Zivkovic
,
P. Lazarevic
,
D. Djuric
,
D. Cubrilo
,
M. Macura
,
M. Vuletic
,
N. Barudzic
,
M. Nesic
, and
Vladimir Jakovljevic

Despite worldwide popularity of soccer, there are still insufficient data about the effects of training process on oxidative stress-induced damage, which may occur during chronic exercise. The present study aimed to determine the effects of a six-month training programme on basal redox status of young male soccer players. The study included 26 male soccer players, aged 12–13, who participated in a six-month training programme, and 26 age-matched non-athletes who were not implemented in the training process. Blood samples were collected (before and after six-month training programme) in order to measure the following oxidative stress markers: index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS), nitrites (NO2 ), superoxide anion radical (O2 ), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) level. After six months, the levels of TBARS and NO2 were significantly increased, while the O2 and H2O2 remained unchanged. On the other hand, SOD and CAT activity increased, while GSH decreased. A carefully prepared training programme could strengthen most components of antioxidant defence systems and, except lipid peroxidation, does not promote oxidative stress in response to regular physical activity. These findings could help in the improvement of training programmes for young athletes.

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