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Abstract  

Photodissolution tests of UO2 sintered pellets were carried out in 3M nitric acid solution and at about 50 °C under UV irradiation. The light source was a Hg-lamp emitting a light of 254nm wavelength. In the products, chemicals such as H2O2 and NO2 ion were detected during photodissolution of the UO2 sintered pellets. Based on this result, a new dissolution mechanism of UO2 in nitric acid solution by photochemical reaction was suggested in this study.

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Abstract  

A new two-step process was investigated to treat LiCl molten salt waste containing volatile radionuclides generated from an electro-metallurgical processing (pyro-processing) of spent oxide fuels. First, the chemical form of the soluble LiCl waste was transformed into a chloride-free and less soluble hydroxide compound by an electrochemical method, where an electrolytic de-chlorination was performed without adding any chemical salt. Then, a gelation process of the chemical form-changed Li compound, named gel-route stabilization/solidification (GRSS) system aimed to reduce the volatility of the radionuclides greatly, was introduced to stabilize/solidify the hydroxide salt wastes. The application of the electrochemical dechlorination/transformation process and the subsequent gel-route stabilization process to treat the soluble LiCl salt wastes was found to be effective.

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Abstract  

The uranium ingot casting process is one of the steps which consolidate uranium deposits produced by electrorefiner in an ingot form in a pryprocessing technique. Since molten uranium metal reacts with a graphite crucible when the uranium is being dissolved, a graphite crucible cannot be used. Accordingly, a ceramic material must be selected which does not react with the dissolving uranium and this must be used as a coating material on the graphite crucible surface. As to this research, a reactivity experiments were performed between the coating layer and uranium by applying a thermal spray coating to the graphite material with alumina and YSZ ceramic material. As shown in the experimental result, the YSZ coating layer showed a stronger adhesive property on the side where there is no Ni–Al binding material. Moreover, no reaction was apparent between the YSZ coating layer and the uranium. Accordingly, the YSZ material and the process of thermal spray coating are considered to solve the reactive problem between uranium and a graphite crucible.

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Abstract  

The formation of precipitates by hydrazine was experimentally examined in the simulated high level liquid waste (HLLW), which was composed of 9 elements (Nd, Fe, Ni, Mo, Zr, Pd, Ru, Cs, Sr). Palladium was precipitated over 90% above 0.05M of hydrazine concentration and at 2M HNO3, while all of the other elements were hardly precipitated. The elements of Pd and Zr were precipitated 93% and 70% in the simulated solution in which the concentrations of Zr and Mo were decreased from 0.069M to 3.45·10–3M and 6.9·10–3M, respectively, and the acid concentration was decreased to about 0.5M after denitration. In a Pd solution of 0.5M and 2M HNO3, the precipitation yield of Pd increased with hydrazine concentration and reached over 98% at 0.1M. The precipitation yield of Pd at 0.5M HNO3 was higher than at 2M HNO3. The Pd precipitate, formed by adding hydrazine to an acidified solution, was an amorphous compound consisting of Pd, hydrazine, nitrate and hydrate.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
Dong-Yong Chung
,
Eung-Ho Kim
,
Young-Joon Shin
,
Jae-Hyung Yoo
,
Cheong-Song Choi
, and
Jong-Duk Kim

Abstract  

The decomposition rate of oxalate by hydrogen peroxide has been investigated by a KMnO4 titration method. The rate equation for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the aqueous phase is 1n([H2O2]/[H2O2]0)=–k1·t, where k1=0.2, for [H+]<2M, k1=0.2+0.34([H+]–2), for [H+]>2M. As the acidity increases over 2M, an acid catalysis effect appeard. The new rate equation proposed for the decomposition of oxalate by hydrogen peroxide is

\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$- \frac{d}{{dt}}X_{[OX]} = k_2 [H_2 O_2 ]_0 (1 - X_{[OX]} )(e^{ - k_1 t} - \frac{{[OX]_0 }}{{[H_2 O_2 ]_0 }}X_{[OX]} )$$ \end{document}
The rate constant for decomposition of oxalate, k2, increased with nitric acid concentration and the effect of hydrogen ion concentration was expressed as k2=a[H+]n, where the values fora andn were a=1.54, n=0.3 at [H+]<2M, a=0.31, n=2.5 at [H+]>2M, respectively.

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