Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • Author or Editor: J. Mészáros x
  • Medical and Health Sciences x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
P. Rafai
,
A. Székely
, and
J. Mészáros

Karl-Heinz Waldmann and Michael Wendt (editors), Klaus Bickhardt, Karl Heinritzi, Karl Heinz Lahrmann, Hans Plonait , Karl-Heinz Waldman, Michael Wendt and Werner Zimmermann (co-authors): Lehrbuch der Schweinekrankheiten (Textbook of Swine Diseases). Parey Buchverlag, Berlin, 2001. 3rd revised edition. 626 pages with 318 figures and 63 tables. Format 17 × 24 cm. ISBN 3-8263-3373-X. Price: € 89.95.  Roy Mack, Bettina Mikhail and Michel Mikhail: Dictionary of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences / Wörterbuch der Veterinärmedizin und Biowissenschaften / Dictionnaire de médecine vétérinaire et des sciences biologiques (English-German-French). 3rd, revised and expanded edition, 2002. Parey Buchverlag, Berlin. 1692 pages. 17 × 24 cm. ISBN 3-8263-3405-1. Price: € 94.95.  Környezet- és Természetvédelmi Lexikon (Encyclopaedia of Environmental Protection and Nature Conservation) (in Hungarian language). 2nd, revised and expanded edition. Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2002. Hardcover, two volumes (664 and 588 pages).

Restricted access

Body size, physique, body composition and physiological performance of elite athletes's independent aspects, have aroused the interest of exercise scientists, but studies that combine these aspects in elite athletes are scarcely available. The aim of the present study was to describe the selected anthropometric and exercise physiological characteristics of some Hungarian top athletes. The investigated subjects were qualified Hungarian water polo players (n=25), paddlers (n=24) and modern pentathlonists (n=20), all of whom had been medalists at several continental and intercontinental competitions. The athletes' body composition was estimated by the Drinkwater–Ross (45) body mass fractionation technique. Peak physiological performance was estimated by graded exhausting spiroergometric treadmill exercise. Intergroup differences in mean height, body mass and body composition characteristics were significant at the 5% level of random error. By the results of spiroergometry, all the three groups compared could be qualified as physically excellently trained. The greatest oxygen uptake relative to body mass was found in the modern pentathlonists (73.22 ml´kg–1´min–1) and the lowest one (59.79) in the water polo players. The authors do not disregard the favourable effects of regular and adequate trainings in the development of the studied characteristics, but in their opinion the process of proper selection has been the most important factor that explains the observed significant intergroup differences.__

Restricted access

A bioluminescent derivative of Bacillus subtilis containing a plasmid encoding a luxAB fusion under control of a vegetative promoter and gives bioluminescence upon addition of an exogenous long-chain aldehyde has been used as test organism. Its spore populations have been produced and their heat- and radiation survival curves established. Heat-sensitization effect of pre-irradiation of spores was proven not only by colony counting but also with differential scanning calorimetry. Under a linearly programmed temperature increase, the heat destruction of spores surviving 2.5 kGy gamma irradiation resulted in at a few centigrade lower temperature than that of untreated spores. Heat denaturation endotherms in the DSC-thermogram of irradiated spores were shifted to lower temperatures as well. Comparative turbidimetric, luminometric and phase-contrast microscopic studies of untreated, heat-treated and irradiated spore populations showed that the kinetics of germination and the light emission during germination of radiation-inactivated spores were the same as those of untreated spores, revealing that the pre-formed luciferase enzyme packaged into the spores during sporulation remained intact after an irradiation dose causing 90% decrease in number of colony forming spores. Therefore, in contrast to heat-treated spores, the initial bioluminescence reading upon germination of irradiated spores does not reflect the viable count of their population.

Restricted access

Suspensions of a bioluminescent (luxAB) transformant of Listeria monocytogenes in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer were pressurised and the effect of the pressure treatment was monitored by plate counting. When the bacteria were suspended in NaCl- and nisin-free buffer the number of colony forming units (CFU) decreased by 3 and 6 log cycles after 300 MPA for 10 and 30 min, respectively. Supplementing the plating medium with 5% NaCl did not influence the colony forming capacity of non-pressurised cells, however, CFU of residual populations after respective treatments of 300 MPa for 10 and 30 min were reduced by a further 2 and 3.5 log cycles in case of salt containing plates. Nisin-addition to the plating medium caused less than one log unit decrease in the CFU of the non-pressurised population. However, the CFU of 10 min-pressurised sample was 4 log cycles less in the nisin-containing plates than in the nisin-free ones, whereas no colonies were formed in the nisin-containing plates even when 1 ml was inoculated from the originally 1010 CFU/ml population after 300 MPa for 30 min. The luciferase activities (bioluminescence intensities) decreased concomitant with the reduction of the viable cell counts, however, they were approx. 0.6-0.8 log units less in the presence of 5% NaCl in the pressurised suspension than those expected from the previously established linear correlation between the logarithmic light outputs and the logarithmic viable cell counts.

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
A. Prókai
,
J. Mészáros
,
Zs. Mészáros
,
A. Photiou
,
I. Vajda
, and
Á. Sziva

Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity is a serious social and health problem both in the economically developed and developing countries. Despite this fact the nation-wide growth studies completed in Hungary during the past 30 years had not categorised the children either by body fat content or nutritional status. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of overweight and obese boys in the country at the beginning of the new millennium.Height, body mass and four skinfold thicknesses were measured in 7173 volunteer boys aged between 7 and 10 and living in various urban and rural settlements of Hungary between 2003 and 2005. Nutritional status was qualified by the BMI and relative body fat content. The significantly increasing prevalence with age of overweight and obesity ranged between 10.3 and 23.4%. The results showed the joint effects of a secular trend of growth and of a remarkably changed lifestyle. Of these the consequences of the lifestyle are the more important ones. The high and possibly further increasing prevalence of child-age overweight and obesity reminds one of the observations of Kopp and associates (5), namely that of the increased prevalence of chronic childhood diseases during the past 15 years. More intense habitual physical activity and dramatic changes in dietary habits still promise some solution. No one should reckon, however, with the efficiency of physical education at the schools with its very few classes.

Restricted access

The prevalence of overweight or fat children and adolescents has markedly increased in Hungary during the past three decades. Among the possible factors insufficient physical activity and a relative or absolute excess of calorie intake associated to it can be regarded as the most important ones. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of a 20-week aerobic exercise on body composition and on the exercise tested cardio-respiratory functions in 10-year-old obese boys. Obesity was defined by a BMI greater than the cut-off value reported by Cole and co-workers (5) and a relative body fat content above 30% (13). Of the study group 21 volunteer children completed the program; the contrast group contained 28 obese boys. Mean calendar age was 10.03±0.26 in the study group (S) and 9.88±0.29 in the control group (C). The members of group S had two curricular physical education (PE) classes a week and three extracurricular aerobic physical activity sessions of 60 min net time in the afternoon, on Mondays (swimming and water games), Wednesdays (folk dance) and Fridays (soccer). Group C had only 2 PE classes a week. Anthropometric and spiroergometric data were collected in the middle of January and June of 2004. Relative body fat content and BMI did not increase during the observation period in contrast to the significant increase of both in the control group. Peak minute ventilation, aerobic power, oxygen pulse, and running distance (performed on a treadmill) increased in group S, and did not change in group C.The program was considered successful despite that the changes in the observed physiological and physical indicators appeared to be slight. However, the 5-month elevated level of physical activity brought about such development in the physical status of the obese subjects that might be an appropriate basis for regular training. Fortunately, the cardio-respiratory functions of the investigated boys were not affected yet by obesity, consequently the really dramatic change in their further lifestyle exclusively depends on their decision.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Mária Kelemen
,
Katalin Forgách
,
Judit Iván
,
V. Palya
,
T. Süveges
,
B. Tóth
, and
J. Mészáros

The appearance of very virulent strains of infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus at the end of the 1980s made it necessary to develop more effective immunization procedures. To facilitate this, the immunogenicity and the immunosuppressive effect of a mild (G-87), an intermediate (LIBD) and an intermediate-plus (IBDV 2512) IBDV strain were tested after the in ovo inoculation of 18-day-old SPF and broiler chicken embryos. It was established that no noteworthy difference existed between the immunized and the control embryos in hatching rate and hatching weight. The higher the virulence of the vaccine virus strain, the more severe damage it caused to the lymphocytes of the bursa of Fabricius. In SPF chickens, the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres induced by a Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine administered at day old decreased in inverse ratio to the virulence of the IBD vaccine strain, while in broiler chickens this was not observed. Despite the decrease of the HI titre, the level of protection did not decline, or did so only after the use of the ‘hot’ strain. SPF chickens immunized in ovo with a complex vaccine prepared from strain IBDV 2512 and IBD antibody showed the same protection against Newcastle disease as the broilers. In broiler chicken embryos immunized in ovo, only strain IBDV 2512 induced antibody production, and such chickens were protected against IBD at 3 weeks of age. The complex vaccine administered in ovo has been used successfully at farm hatcheries as well.

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
Krisztina Rusai
,
A. Prokai
,
C. Juanxing
,
K. Meszaros
,
B. Szalay
,
K. Pásti
,
V. Müller
,
U. Heemann
,
J. Lutz
,
T. Tulassay
, and
A. Szabo

Previous experimental data suggest that steroids might have protective effects during hypoxic/ischemic injury of various organs. In this study, the association between dexamethason (Dexa) treatment and the anti-apoptotic SGK-1 was tested in ischemic renal injury. In vitro, HK-2 cells were exposed to 24 h hypoxia, and the effect of Dexa incubation on SGK-1 expression / activation and on cell death was studied. In an in vivo rat model of unilateral renal IR, animals were treated with Dexa, and serum renal function parameters, tissue injury and SGK-1 expression and localization were examined after different reperfusion times (2 h, 4 h and 24 h). Dexa at a dose of 2 mg/L exerted a protective effect on cell survival assessed by LDH release and vital staining paralleled by marked up-regulation of SGK-1. In rats, 2 mg/kg Dexa treatment 24 h prior to ischemia resulted in less severe tissue injury and ameliorated urea nitrogen levels 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, SGK-1 expression and phosphorylation were higher in Dexa animals demonstrated by Western blot and immunofluorescence technique. Our results provide novel data on the signalling mechanism of Dexa under hypoxia / ischemia and further support that Dexa emerges as an attractive pharmacological agent for the prevention of ischemic injury.

Restricted access