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Abstract

This study builds the interdisciplinary knowledge network of China, which is used to catch the knowledge exchange structure of disciplines, and investigates the evolution process from 1981 to 2010. A network analysis was performed to examine the special structure and we compare state of the networks in different periods to determine how the network has got such properties. The dataset are get from the reference relationship in literature on important Chinese academic journals from 1980 to 2010. The analytical results reveal the hidden network structure of interdisciplinary knowledge flows in China and demonstrate that the network is highly connected and has a homogeneous link structure and heterogeneous weight distribution. Through comparing of the network in three periods, that is 1981–1990, 1991–2000 and 2001–2010, we find that the special evolution process, which is limited by the number of nodes, play an important influence on interdisciplinary knowledge flows.

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Studia Scientiarum Mathematicarum Hungarica
Authors:
Jing Quan Chong
,
Xing Chen Huang
,
Tuo Yeong Lee
,
Jing Tao Li
,
Hui Xiang Sim
,
Jing Ren Soh
,
Gabriel Jiaxu Tan
, and
Jay Kin Heng Tai

We prove that

k = 1 n sin  k θ k π θ π o π sin t t d t + 1 2 sin θ + 1 2 1 π 0 π sin t t d t 1 2 sin 2 θ

for all integers n ≥ 1 and ɵ ≤ 8 ≤ π. This result refines inequalities due to Jackson (1911) and Turán (1938).

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Scientometrics
Authors:
Chuanfu Chen
,
Kai Sun
,
Gang Wu
,
Qiong Tang
,
Jian Qin
,
Kuei Chiu
,
Yushuang Fu
,
Xiaofang Wang
, and
Jing Liu

Abstract  

The quality and credibility of Internet resources has been a concern in scholarly communication. This paper reports a quantitative analysis of the use of Internet resources in journal articles and addresses the concerns for the use of Internet resources scholarly journals articles. We collected the references listed in 35,698 articles from 14 journals published during 1996 to 2005, which resulted in 1,000,724 citations. The citation data was divided into two groups: traditional citations and Web citations, and examined based on frequencies of occurrences by domain and type of Web citation sources. The findings included: (1) The number of Web citations in the journals investigated had been increasing steadily, though the quantity was too small to draw an inclusive conclusion on the data about their impact on scientific research; (2) A great disparity existed among different disciplines in terms of using information on the Web. Applied disciplines and interdisciplinary sciences tended to cite more information on the Web, while classical and experimental disciplines cited little of Web information; (3) The frequency of citations was related to the reputation of the author or the institution issuing the information, and not to the domain or webpage types; and (4) The researchers seemed to lack confidence in Internet resources, and Web information was not as frequently cited as reported in some publications before. The paper also discusses the need for developing a guideline system to evaluate Web resources regarding their authority and quality that lies in the core of credibility of Web information.

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