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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors:
Szilvia Veszelka
,
Judit Laszy
,
Tamás Pázmány
,
László Németh
,
Izabella Obál
,
László Fábián
,
Gábor Szabó
,
Csongor S. Ábrahám
,
Mária A. Deli
, and
Zoltán Urbányi

Abstract

Serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the innate immune system, does not penetrate the brain in physiological conditions; however, SAP is a stabilizing component of the amyloid plaques in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the cerebrovascular transport of human SAP in animal experiments and in culture blood-brain barrier (BBB) models. After intravenous injection, no SAP could be detected by immunohistochemistry or ELISA in healthy rat brains. Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide injection increased BBB permeability for SAP and the number of cerebral vessels labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-SAP in mice. Furthermore, when SAP was injected to the rat hippocampus, a time-dependent decrease in brain concentration was seen demonstrating a rapid SAP efflux transport in vivo. A temperature-dependent bidirectional transport of FITC-SAP was observed in rat brain endothelial monolayers. The permeability coefficient for FITC-SAP was significantly higher in abluminal to luminal (brain to blood) than in the opposite direction. The luminal release of FITC-SAP from loaded endothelial cells was also significantly higher than the abluminal one. Our data indicate the presence of BBB efflux transport mechanisms protecting the brain from SAP penetration. Damaged BBB integrity due to pathological insults may increase brain SAP concentration contributing to development of neurodegenerative diseases.

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Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors:
Viktória Zsom-Muha
,
Lien Le Phuong Nguyen
,
László Baranyai
,
Géza Hitka
,
Zsuzsanna Horváth-Mezőfi
,
Gergő Szabó
, and
Tamás Zsom

Abstract

Among improper harvest and/or postharvest storage conditions, the effect of direct sunlight plays an important role in quality degradation of potato resulting in the development of green surface color based on chlorophyll formation associated with the formation of poisonous chemicals – glycoalcaloids – known as α-chaconine and α-solanine. Yellow skinned and fleshed potatoes with or without visible initial marks of green surface color were stored at normal room temperature under direct natural (sun)light conditions for almost two months. The aim of this study was the preliminary investigation of the sunlight induced formation of chlorophyll related compounds in potato indirectly by the detection of chlorophyll development. This attempt was based on nondestructive determination of chlorophyll related spectral and fluorescence indices for both sunlight exposed and unexposed potato sides. For both potato groups the chlorophyll content related DA-index® and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics (F0, Fm, Fv and Fv/Fm) increased during the storage period representing chlorophyll formation. In the case of Fm, Fv and Fv/Fm values, the yellow samples reached the values of the initial spotted green samples by the 7th–9th days. From this time, the chlorophyll fluorescence values changed only minimally. After storage day 34, in the case of both at day 0 yellow and green spotted potatoes, the sunny side's F0 value was lower than that of shaded side. Close relationship was found between the results of Walz monitoring-PAM (Pulse Amplitude-Modulated) chlorophyll fluorometer and the PSI (Photon Systems Instruments) chlorophyll fluorescence imaging device (e.g. Fv R2 = 0.7226). According to our preliminary results, the Vis/NIR DA-meter®, the monitoring-PAM and the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging fluorometers were found to be suitable nondestructive devices for further investigations concerning the postharvest chlorophyll formation based greening phenomena, which is associated with solanine development in potato.

Open access