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SmpB, a small tmRNA binding protein, is essential for trans-translation. 6His and FLAG tagged SmpB was cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. It was expressed in Escherichia coli using the T7 promoter-polymerase system. Anti-FLAG M2 agarose was used for its purification. Mycobacterial SmpB copurifies with other proteins. We identified elongation factor EF-Tu in the purified SmpB preparations.

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The objective of this study was to determine whether creatine supplementation (CrS) could improve mechanical power output, and swimming performance in highly trained junior competitive fin swimmers. Sixteen male fin swimmers (age:15.9±1.6 years) were randomly and evenly assigned to either a creatine (CR, 4×5 g/day creatine monohydrate for 5 days) or placebo group (P, same dose of a dextrose-ascorbic acid placebo) in a double-blind research. Before and after CrS the average power output was determined by a Bosco-test and the swimming time was measured in two maximal 100 m fin swims. After five days of CrS the average power of one minute continuous rebound jumps increased by 20.2%. The lactate concentration was significantly less after 5 minutes restitution at the second measurement in both groups. The swimming time was significantly reduced in both first (pre: 50.69±1.41 s; post: 48.86±1.34 s) and second (pre: 50.39±1.38 s; post: 48.53±1.35 s) sessions of swimming in CR group, but remained almost unchanged in the P group.The results of this study indicate that five day Cr supplementation enhances the dynamic strength and may increase anaerobic metabolism in the lower extremity muscles, and improves performance in consecutive maximal swims in highly trained adolescent fin swimmers.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
P. Koska
,
É. Dojcsák Kiss-Tóth
,
A. Juhász Szalai
,
G. Kovács
,
L. Barkai
,
O. Rácz
, and
Bertalan Fodor

An important obstacle to achieve optimal glycaemic control in diabetics on intensive insulin therapy is the frequent occurrence of insulin induced hypoglycaemic events. In healthy subjects and in diabetics without autonomic neuropathy hypoglycaemia activates the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in epinephrine and glucagon release. Both hormones increase hepatic glucose production and this counterregulatory response is of key importance of glucose homeostasis. Recent research shed light on the fact that antecedent hypoglycaemic episodes play pivotal role in hypoglycaemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF). In this condition the sympatho-adrenal response to decreased blood glucose level is blunted. The existence of HAAF clearly indicates that the nervous system contributes to glucose homeostasis in a substantial manner. This review outlines the mechanisms of both peripheral and central neuronal glucose sensing and of neural pathways involved in the counterregulatory response.

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