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The authors screened 34 large cattle herds for the presence of Mycoplasma bovis infection by examining slaughtered cattle for macroscopic lung lesions, by culturing M. bovis from lung lesions and at the same time by testing sera for the presence of antibodies against M. bovis. Among the 595 cattle examined, 33.9% had pneumonic lesions, mycoplasmas were isolated from 59.9% of pneumonic lung samples, and 10.9% of sera from those animals contained antibodiesto M. bovis. In 25.2% of the cases M. bovis was isolated from lungs with no macroscopic lesions. The proportion of seropositive herds was 64.7%. The average seropositivity rate of individuals was 11.3% but in certain herds it exceeded 50%. A probability model was developed for examining the relationship among the occurrence of pneumonia, the isolation of M. bovis from the lungs and the presence of M. bovis specific antibodies in sera.

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In six healthy mares and 24 mares showing reproductive disorders swab samples were taken from the fossa clitoridis to isolate Taylorella equigenitalis, and from the uterus to isolate mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas and other aerobic bacteria. Swab samples were also taken from the uterus for Chlamydiaantigen ELISA and ChlamydiaPCR studies. The uterus of 27 mares was examined cytologically, and biopsy samples were taken from the endometrium for histological examinations and for immunohistochemical examinations aimed at the detection of chlamydiae. T. equigenitalis, mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas and chlamydiae could not be detected from any of the mares examined. Aerobic facultative pathogenic bacteria were isolated from mares with endometritis in four cases. In 18 out of 22 mares with endometritis (82%) no infective agents could be demonstrated. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relative importance of non-infectious causes of endometritis and of anaerobic bacteria often detectable in the uterus in the aetiology of the reproductive disorders observed.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
M. Tenk
,
Á. Bálint
,
L. Stipkovits
,
Judit Bíró
, and
L. Dencső

A Mycoplasma bovis species-specific PCR assay has been developed with improvement of a previously described method (Ghadersohi et al., 1997). This test and its semi-nested version (Hayman and Hirst, 2003) did not function at all in our hands. A new reverse primer (Mbr2) was designed using previously published sequence data. For testing specificity, DNA was extracted from the most frequently occurring mycoplasma species and bacteria of bovine origin. The new PCR detected only Mycoplasma bovis. Moreover, no cross-reaction was observed with the genetically closest relative species, M. agalactiae. The target organism could be detected in a dose as low as 150 CFU ml-1 in broth cultures using ethidium-bromide-stained agarose gels.

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The objective of the investigations was to study the causes of abortion in sheep and goats in Hungary during a 7.5-year period. The authors investigated 246 cases of ovine and 75 cases of caprine abortions by different diagnostic methods. An infectious origin was found in 126 cases (51.2%) of ovine and 19 cases (25%) of caprine abortions. The most important cause of ovine and caprine abortions was Chlamydophila abortus infection with a prevalence of 46% and 17%, respectively. Other infections causing sheep and goat abortions were present only in 5.2% and 8% of the cases, respectively. The results obtained by different diagnostic methods are discussed.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
L. Stipkovits
,
Á Dán
,
Erika Varga
,
Paula De Santis
,
Rosella Lelly
,
Éva Kaszanyitzky
,
Ildikó Ferenczné Paluska
,
M. Tenk
,
L. Tekes
, and
B. Harrach

At abattoirs and farms, 1248 sera were collected from animals representing 121 farms, and examined by complement fixation test using Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides small colony type (MmmSC) antigen. All sera were negative except seven from four farms, giving ++ reactions in the serum dilution of 1:10. On retesting, these sera and additional 30 sera collected repeatedly in both farms gave negative results. In isolation attempts, 953 lung samples collected from slaughtered cattle at the same abattoirs, and 326 nasal swabs collected from 11 herds proved to be negative for the presence of MmmSC, but M. bovis was isolated frequently. In the small farms 23.95% of the animals had pleurisy and/or pneumonia while in the large herds 34.69% had lesions. DNA extracted from 50 nasal swabs and 430 lung samples was examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using M. mycoides cluster-specific primers. DNA from further 325 lung samples was tested by the more specific M. mycoides subspecies mycoides small colony/large colony/capri specific primers and 196 samples by nested PCR specific for MmmSC. All gave negative results. The detection level of cluster-specific primers and the more specific primers was 33.4 pg of DNA, whereas that of nested PCR was 0.33 pg.

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