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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Megan E. Cowie
,
Hyoun S. Kim
,
David C. Hodgins
,
Daniel S. McGrath
,
Marco D. T. Scanavino
, and
Hermano Tavares

Background and aims

Gambling disorder (GD) and compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) may commonly co-occur. Yet, the psychiatric correlates of these co-occurring disorders are an untapped area of empirical scrutiny, limiting our understanding of appropriate treatment modalities for this dual-diagnosed population. This study examined the demographic and clinical correlates of CSB in a sample of treatment-seeking individuals with GD (N = 368) in São Paulo, Brazil.

Methods

Psychiatrists and psychologists conducted semi-structured clinical interviews to identify rates of CSB and other comorbid psychiatric disorders. The Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire was administered to assess additional addictive behaviors. The TCI and BIS-11 were used to assess facets of personality. Demographic and gambling variables were also assessed.

Results

Of the total sample, 24 (6.5%) met diagnostic criteria for comorbid CSB (GD + CSB). Compared to those without compulsive sexual behaviors (GD − CSB), individuals with GD + CSB were more likely to be younger and male. No differences in gambling involvement emerged. Individuals with GD + CSB tended to have higher rates of psychiatric disorders (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and bulimia nervosa) and engage in more addictive behaviors (problematic alcohol use, drug use, and exercise) compared to GD − CSB. Those with GD + CSB evidenced less self-directedness, cooperativeness, self-transcendence, and greater motor impulsivity. Logistic regression showed that the predictors of GD + CSB, which remained in the final model, were being male, a diagnosis of bulimia, greater gambling severity, and less self-transcendence.

Discussion and conclusion

Given those with GD + CSB evidence greater psychopathology, greater attention should be allocated to this often under studied comorbid condition to ensure adequate treatment opportunities.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Marco D. T. Scanavino
,
Alia Garrudo Guirado
,
João Miguel Marques
,
Maria Luiza Sant'Ana do Amaral
,
Bruna Messina
,
Sirlene Caramello dos Reis
,
Vivian Boschesi Barros
,
Carmita Helena Najjar Abdo
,
Hermano Tavares
, and
Jeffrey T. Parsons

Abstract

Background

Little attention has been given to efficacious treatment and adherence to treatment of compulsive sexual behavior (CSB).

Aims

Randomized controlled trial investigated short-term psychodynamic group therapy followed by relapse prevention group (STPGP-RPGT) and pharmacological treatment (PT) for CSB men on sexual compulsivity and adherence.

Method

135 men, 38 (SD = 9) years old on average, were randomly assigned to 1) STPGP-RPGT; 2) PT; 3) Both. Participants completed measures at baseline, 25th, and 34th week. 57 (42.2%) participants dropped out between baseline and 25th week, and 68 (50.4%) between baseline and 34th week. 94 (69.6%) did not adhere (80% pills taken or attended 75% therapy sessions).

Results

A significant interaction effect was found between time and group (F (4, 128) = 2.62, P = 0.038, ES = 0.08), showing who received PT improved less in sexual compulsivity than those who received STPGP-RPGT (t = 2.41; P = 0.038; ES = 0.60) and PT + STPGP-RPGT (t = 3.15; P = 0.007, ES = 0.74). Adherent participants improved more in sexual compulsivity than non-adherent at the 25th week (t = 2.82; P = 0.006, ES = 0.65) and 34th week (t = 2.26; P = 0.027, ES = 0.55), but there was no interaction effect, F (2, 130) = 2.88; P = 0.06; ES = 0.04). The most reported behavior (masturbation) showed greater risk of non-adherence (72.6%).

Discussion and conclusions

Adherent participants improved better than non-adherent. Participants who received psychotherapy improved better than those who received PT. Methodological limitations preclude conclusions on efficacy.

Open access