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Both demonology and medical learning wanted to define what material proofs they were to use in order to alleviate the politically rooted disease symptoms of the early modern period. Finding the proper therapeutic treatment required the appropriate description of the pathology, revealing the causes and consequences and making the right diagnosis. Several key questions were formulated concerning these requirements. Most of the questions formulated in this way are based on a formal syllogism that meets the normative requirements of disciplines that include law, theology and medicine and whose formal elements became valid within the systems of fulfilment of these disciplines themselves. In this paper I shall attempt to introduce the scholarly literature based on these formal logical criteria that address material proofs, omens, prophecies, oracles and miracles. I shall then outline how this debate in European secondary literature has been received in Hungarian scholarship.

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Words like aggression, violence, and violent actions usually carry destructive meanings. People tend to forget their constructive culturally determined meanings. In spite of this, it can be argued that aggressive feelings, hatred, anger, verbal aggression, threatening behaviour, assault, inflicting pain, injuring or ritual killing of men, or the fighting of war are all part of our lives as much as feasts and rituals that bind communities together, or the command to love of different religious ideologies. In the 16th century there was a definitive turn in judging the body in public. It meant that public attention gradually turned from the corpse of Christ to the bodies of the thieves. The two thieves were brought down from their crosses, laid out on the dissecting table, or their bodies were torn apart during fights. Evil-doers became part of scientific cognition. The antisocial public enemy became a hero of the community in the popular literature and historic stories. The conserved and stuffed bodies of robbers and killers were displayed in the first museums of the Early Modern Age, as a main attraction. Rebels were cut into pieces as part of a baroque play on the killing floor to display the parts in buildings of the town. The body of the everyday killer became a spectacle, and the interest in the mind of the solitary killer developed medical thinking on the human spirit.

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Archaeologiai Értesítő
Authors:
Éva Kelemen
,
Mária Tóth
,
Ferenc Kristály
,
Péter Rózsa
, and
István Nyilas

The study focuses on the comparative archaeometric (petrographic, geochemical and archaeobotanical) analysis of the brick samples from the excavation of twenty-four rural churches of the Árpádian Age and the Late Middle Ages (11th–16th centuries), two kindred monasteries and three Árpádian Age settlements in Counties Békés and Csongrád. One of the main goals of the analysis was to determine the composition and the firing temperature of the bricks.

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Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Authors:
Benedek Láng,
,
Ildikó Tamás,
,
Vilmos Voigt,
,
Judit Kis-Halas,
,
Tóth G. Péter,
, and
Gábor Vargyas
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