Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Salvatore Costanza x
  • Arts and Humanities x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Ancient classical culture usually links gambling (plays with knucklebones, dice, pawns) with divination and love's matters. It is noteworthy, to examine playing by knucklebones (Greek astragaloi). The connection between astragals, games and the erotic sphere clearly appears in Eros-Ganymede episode in the 3rd Book of Apollonius' Argonautica. A fragment of Callimachus also deals with knucklebones. Many Greek lyric and epigrammatic poets echo this topic. In sum, Apollonius allows us to discover a usual imagery: Eros as a player with knucklebones shows that Love masters the human life. It is thus an evident symbol of fate.

Restricted access

Abstract

Franciscus Filelfus (Tolentino 1398 – Florenz 1481) is the author of the largest Humanistic correspondence in Latin and Greek. He is also a relevant source for the intellectual and political history of his times. In the 1420s, he gained a full knowledge of Greek in Constantinople, where he was integrated into Byzantine élite. In particular, the joint emperor John VIII Palaiologos appointed him as his personal secretary. On behalf of John, Filelfo attended in 1423 the international congress in Buda, where he met personally with the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund and other European leaders. In his Letters to Roman popes, kings and princes, the Italian humanist proposed himself as alter Nestor, the best man to give his advice on the war against the Turks in Central and South-Eastern Europe. He is particularly interested in Hungarian history. At this respect, he mentions the most important events relating to Hungarian resistance against the Ottoman empire such as the defence of Belgrade (Nándorfehérvár) in 1456. Therefore, he praises the exploits and military successes against the Turks pursued by the regent John Hunyadi and his son, King Matthias Corvinus who is remarkably worthy of admiration. Both are praised as defensores Christianitatis. Therefore, Filelfo assigns to Hungary and Hungarian people the leading role in the crusade against the Ottomans.

Restricted access

Abstract

Jason's coming back to Iolcus embodies the return from exile after an unjustified usurpation. Pelias overthrew his half-brother Aeson, and he forced the latter's new-born Jason into exile. In the Fourth Pythian Ode for Arcesilaus IV of Cyrene, Pindar's mythical digression focuses on the perspective of the exile Jason coming back to Iolcus. Pindar focuses on this story in fuller detail because he favors the recall of the exile Damophilus, a disgraced member of the aristocracy from Cyrene. The mythical conflict of the Aeolid family corresponds to the historical internal strife among the Battiads. The opposition to this dynasty should shortly put an end to their power after the overthrow of Arcesilaus IV. Given his authority as initiated into poetry, Pindar has the right to advise the king to reconcile with his opponents. Finally, this Ode is written to support the right of Damophilus, who was a close friend of Pindar, to be allowed to return to his homeland.

Restricted access