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  • Author or Editor: Z.L. Ren x
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Abstract  

Thermogravimetry (TG) was employed to study the thermal degradation kinetics of poly(etherketone/sulfone)ethylimide (PEK-IE and PES-IE). The corresponding decomposition activation energies and reaction orders were obtained and the comparison was made with their parent polymerspoly(ether-ketone/sulfone) with Cardo group (PEK-C and PES-C). The results show that the degradation activation energies of PEK-IE and PES-IE were lower than that of PEK-C and PES-C; and two stages of the degradation process were found for all the four polymers. For PEK-IE and PES-IE, the activation energies in the first decomposition stage are much lower than that in the second stage and the two stages can be taken as slow induction and fast degradation, whereas for PEK-C and PES-C the activation energies in the first decomposition stage are larger than that in the second stage, and the two stages can both be taken as two fast degradation stages. The decomposition mechanism of the two stages was also speculated.

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Abstract  

Effects of fullerenes including FS, EFS and pure C60 on thermal behaviors of polyethylene glycol (PEG) have been studied by employing thermogravimetry-differential thermogravimetry (TG-DTG), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and off-line furnace-type pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The products were collected by Cambridge filter pad which was widely used in analyzing the combustion products of cigarette. The results showed that the addition of fullerenes obviously restrained the thermal decomposition of PEG. The initial decomposition temperatures (IDT) and maximum decomposition peak temperatures (MDT) were evidently postponed by the addition of fullerenes. Pyrolysis products with one or two hydroxyl end groups obviously increased with the addition of 10% C60. The reasons of the changes were discussed from the aspects of reaction mechanisms.

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Summary

A selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of xanthotoxol (1), xanthotoxin (2), isoimpinellin (3), bergapten (4), oxypeucedanin (5), imperatorin (6), cnidilin (7), and isoimperatorin (8) in rat bile and urine using pimpinellin as an internal standard (IS). An Agilent 1200 liquid chromatography system (Agilent Technologies, USA) equipped with a quaternary pump, an autosampler, and a column compartment was used for all analyses. Chromatographic separations were performed on a Sapphire C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), and the column temperature was maintained at 30°C; the sample injection volume was 10 μL. The specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effect, and several stabilities were validated for all analytes in the rat bile and urine samples. The method was successfully applied in monitoring the concentrations of eight coumarins in rat bile and urine after a single oral administration of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae extract with a dosage of 8.0 mL/kg. In the bile samples, the eight coumarins excreted completely in twenty-four hours. The average percentages of coumarins (1–8) excreted were 0.045%, 0.019%, 0.177%, 0.105%, 0.337%, 0.023%, 0.024%, 0.021%. In the urine samples, the eight coumarins excreted completely in seventy-two hours. The average percentages of coumarins (1–8) excreted were 1.78%, 0.095%, 0.130%, 0.292%, 0.082%, 0.008%, 0.005%, 0.004%. The method is robust and specific and it can successfully complete the requirements of the excretion study of the eight coumarins in Radix Angelicae Dahuricae.

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Abstract

3,3-Dinitroazetidinium (DNAZ) salt of perchloric acid (DNAZ·HClO4) was prepared, it was characterized by the elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and a X-ray diffractometer. The thermal behavior and decomposition reaction kinetics of DNAZ·HClO4 were investigated under a non-isothermal condition by DSC and TG/DTG techniques. The results show that the thermal decomposition process of DNAZ·HClO4 has two mass loss stages. The kinetic model function in differential form, the value of apparent activation energy (E a) and pre-exponential factor (A) of the exothermic decomposition reaction of DNAZ·HClO4 are f(α) = (1 − α)−1/2, 156.47 kJ mol−1, and 1015.12 s−1, respectively. The critical temperature of thermal explosion is 188.5 °C. The values of ΔS , ΔH , and ΔG of this reaction are 42.26 J mol−1 K−1, 154.44 kJ mol−1, and 135.42 kJ mol−1, respectively. The specific heat capacity of DNAZ·HClO4 was determined with a continuous C p mode of microcalorimeter. Using the relationship between C p and T and the thermal decomposition parameters, the time of the thermal decomposition from initiation to thermal explosion (adiabatic time-to-explosion) was evaluated as 14.2 s.

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