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Abstract

Napping is one of the rapid sensory profiling methods, which was established recently to meet the needs of sensory and consumer researchers. This approach provides a holistic evaluation of the tested sample through their positioning in a 2-dimensional space. The protocol of the analysis is somewhat different from the traditionally applied descriptive methods, like Quantitative Descriptive Analysis. In our review, we focus on the applicability of Napping in the field of fermented goods. The accompanying procedures are also investigated (typically Flash Profiling, CATA, and further methods), in order to understand how the combined datasets facilitate the understanding of the sensory characteristics of the products.

Open access
Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors: Lien Phuong Le Nguyen, Vivien Horváth, Mai Sao Dam, Géza Hitka, Tamás Zsom, and Zoltán Kókai

This work was aimed to investigate the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), ethylene absorber (EA), ozone alone or in combination on melon quality during storage. Ethylene production, respiration rates, acoustic firmness, surface color, chilling injury, and disease severity of melon were determined. 1-MCP treated fruits and non 1-MCP treated fruits were stored with sachets of ethylene absorber containing KMnO4 or ozone at 0.1 ppm/h during 10 days at 5 °C and subsequent 4 days at 20 °C. Melons treated with 1-MCP were firmer than the rest of the samples during storage. In addition, 1-MCP reduced the yellowing of melon rind compared to other treatments. The combination of 1-MCP and EA did not offer any additional effect in comparison with 1-MCP alone. There was no significant difference between fruits stored with ethylene absorber, ozone and control samples. Ozone treatment during cold storage decreased disease severity, however, fruits exposed to ozone had more serious decay throughout storage at 20 °C, probably due to the unclean air in the chamber.

Restricted access
Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors: Anikó Kovács, Raul Kolinka, Györgyné Kóczán, and Zoltán Kókai

Abstract

The population of gluten sensitive people has been gradually rising in the last decades. The food industry, especially the bakery industry has to develop more gluten-free products to satisfy the consumer's demand. However, the quality of these products differs from the quality attributes of a standard glutenious bakery product. Therefore, the aim of our research was to develop a good quality gluten-free sourdough product with 3 different gluten-free flours: millet, brown rice and a commercially available mixture (Belbake). We investigated the differences in moisture content, the baking loss, the texture and the sensory properties of the products. According to our results in the case of the moisture content the brown rice sample had the highest, while the millet gave the lowest value. The baking loss measurement gave reverse results. In the texture analysis the brown rice sample was the softest, but the millet and the Belbake had better results in resilience and in springiness. Also, in the sensory analyses the Belbake product was found to be the best by the judges, however, there were no significant differences between them. In conclusion, the product development of a gluten-free sourdough bakery product was successful. Further research is needed to investigate the shelf life of the products.

Open access
Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors: Attila Gere, Abdul Hannan Bin Zulkarnain, Dorina Szakál, Orsolya Fehér, and Zoltán Kókai

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) offers a new instrument for food scientists to evaluate different aspects of food products. The possible applications range from product design testing, evaluation of the labels, effects of different placements or the evaluation of store layouts. These analyses help us to get a deeper understanding of consumers' minds. Additionally, VR can be coupled by several different tools (e.g. eye-trackers or skin conductance sensors or even electroencephalographs). However, as there have been only a limited number of applications published, there are several open questions which need to be answered. In the presented paper the authors aim i) to introduce the current knowledge on VR applications in food science by introducing several fields of applications and ii) to point out the most important questions regarding the applications of VR in food science.

Open access