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Abstract  

The relation between philosophy of science and epistemology is studied using the author co-citation technique. Co-citation links among 62 authors — a representative list of various styles and approaches to rationality — were established using the Arts and Humanities Citation Index. Multidimensional scaling results in a two-dimensional map of authors, where the axes represent the subject (philosophy of science to epistemology) and the method (qualitative to quantitative), respectively. The authors on the map can be clustered into more or less coherent groups at different levels of resolution.

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Abstract  

The paper discusses the often lamented lack of a theory of citations, and the lack of a sociological theory in particular. It draws attention to one proposed theory and discusses the potential reasons why it has not been generally accepted as the theory of citations, despite its merits in explaining many phenomena in the citation behaviour of scientists. This theory has been expounded by Latour and presented, in particular, in his book entitledScience in Action.

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Abstract  

This paper explores the interrelationships between science and technology in the emergingarea of nano-science and technology. We track patent citation relations at the sectoraldisciplinary,the organizational, and the combined industrial/organizational levels. Then weinvestigate the geographic location and organizational affiliation of inventor/authors. Our mainfinding is that there are only a small number of citations connecting nano-patents with nanosciencepapers, while nano-science and technology appear to be relatively well connected incomparison with other fields. Further explorations suggest that nano-science and technology arestill mostly separated spheres, even though there are overlaps, as an analysis of title words shows.Another observation is that university-assigned patents seem to cite papers more frequently thanother patents.

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Abstract  

We describe the steps involved in constructing authors" citation identities (whom they cite) and citation images (who cites them). Familiarity with the intellectual, social, and institutional connections of these authors over time helps inform the analysis and augment the specificity of citation counts. Our study shows that authors" writing and referencing styles constitute a form of watermark for their scholarly output.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Henk F. Moed, Lisa Colledge, Jan Reedijk, Felix Moya-Anegon, Vicente Guerrero-Bote, Andrew Plume, and Mayur Amin

Scimago journal rank (SJR) One criticism sometimes made of traditional citation analysis is that all citations are considered ‘equal’. A citation from a widely-read, multidisciplinary journal counts as strongly as one from a more focused or local

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Abstract  

Many studies have found that collaborative research is, in general, more highly cited than non-collaborative research. This paper describes an investigation into the extent to which the association between high citation and collaboration for Economics articles published in 2000 varies from region to region and depends on the choice of indicator of citation level. Using data from the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) for 18 countries, 17 American states and four indicators of citation level the citation levels of the collaborative articles are compared with the citation levels of the non-collaborative articles. The main findings are that: (a) for every country and every indicator the mean citation level of the collaborative articles was at least as high as that for the non-collaborative articles, but for five US states and for at least one other indicator the citation level of collaborative articles was lower than that of non-collaborative articles, and (b) the extent to which collaborative articles were more highly cited varied considerably from country to country, from state to state, and from indicator to indicator. This indicates the importance of using multiple indicators when investigating citation advantage since the choice of indicator can change the results.

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Abstract

The citation distribution of a researcher shows the impact of their production and determines the success of their scientific career. However, its application in scientific evaluation is difficult due to the bi-dimensional character of the distribution. Some bibliometric indexes that try to synthesize in a numerical value the principal characteristics of this distribution have been proposed recently. In contrast with other bibliometric measures, the biases that the distribution tails provoke, are reduced by the h-index. However, some limitations in the discrimination among researchers with different publication habits are presented in this index. This index penalizes selective researchers, distinguished by the large number of citations received, as compared to large producers. In this work, two original sets of indexes, the central area indexes and the central interval indexes, that complement the h-index to include the central shape of the citation distribution, are proposed and compared.

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Introduction Citation analysis as a mature quantitative research method in bibliometrics and scientometrics has been applied to many disciplines at home and abroad, especially in describing evolution of disciplines, evaluating

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Budapest, Leiden, Leuven, Beijing, Shanghai, etc.) or as independent commercial enterprises (e.g., Science-Metrix in Montreal). Two major companies (Thomson Reuters and Elsevier) are also active in this market. In other words, citation analysis has become

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Scientometrics
Authors: Waister Martins, Marcos Gonçalves, Alberto Laender, and Nivio Ziviani

Abstract  

Assessing the quality of scientific conferences is an important and useful service that can be provided by digital libraries and similar systems. This is specially true for fields such as Computer Science and Electric Engineering, where conference publications are crucial. However, the majority of the existing quality metrics, particularly those relying on bibliographic citations, has been proposed for measuring the quality of journals. In this article we conduct a study about the relative performance of existing journal metrics in assessing the quality of scientific conferences. More importantly, departing from a deep analysis of the deficiencies of these metrics, we propose a new set of quality metrics especially designed to capture intrinsic and important aspects related to conferences, such as longevity, popularity, prestige, and periodicity. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed metrics, we have conducted two sets of experiments that contrast their results against a “gold standard” produced by a large group of specialists. Our metrics obtained gains of more than 12% when compared to the most consistent journal quality metric and up to 58% when compared to standard metrics such as Thomson’s Impact Factor.

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