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Abstract  

The present study compares the international publication productivityof Latin American countries in the fields of business administration and economicsfrom 1995 to 1999. Only four countries – Argentina, Brazil, Chile, andMexico – have a substantial research production in these areas. Amongthese countries, Chile showed the most favorable results according to variousindicators of publication productivity.

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Abstract  

A recent initiative in some Latin American countries, to define thebasic core of credited titles of domestic scientific journals in the different knowledge fields, is reviewed. The policy aim is to strengthen the best journals and to minimize the noise produced by the great number of journals that do a disservice to the authors who publish in them either because of their low quality or because even if they are reasonably good, have a very low impact. It is argued that if the exercise were carried out in a rigorous and systematic way in the countries of the region that publish scientific journals, one might eventually obtain a depurated list of Latin American periodical publications. Such list might be useful as a supplement to the catalogues of mainstream journals registered by ISI and other international databases, and could provide valid alternatives of publication of results for Latin American researchers and for authors of other regions active in subjects in which the countries of the region have significant scientific contributions. It might also help to provide a better indication of the total publishing activity of Latin American countries.

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Abstract  

The purpose of this work was to analyse the non-Science Citation Index subject visibility of the Latin American production in the health field. The methodology used considered manual and automated retrieval of the Latin American journals, as covered by different conventional secondary sources. The IMLA/LILACS (Index Medicus Latinoamericano/Latin American Literature in the Health Sciences) database was used to obtain a master list of the sustained journals for the period 1979–1990. The selected journals were classified by subject content, following the scheme of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. A total of 221 journals were selected and a database was developed. The results corroborated the leadership of Brazil in the field. It was also found that the subject content had a strong trend toward the clinical, medicine field. The subject Medicine was head in the list, with seventy four journals. Several difficulties and barriers to the use of the IMLA/LILACS database were detected. The implications of the overall analysis of this study as affecting researchers, policy makers and data-base producers are stressed by the author.

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The opinion of traditional grammars and the hypothetical derived PIE form is inconsistent as concerns the quantity of the sing. nominative-accusative ending of Latin u-stem neuters. Since the received scholarly opinion holds that the quantity cannot be determinated from the available sources, certain scholars have stated that the ending is a short -u. A comprehensive re-examination of the ancient grammatical opinion and the relevant metrical texts demonstrates that on the basis of two passages, namely Aen. XI 859 and nux 106, the truth of the traditional view, i.e., that the sing. nom.-acc. of u-stem neuters is long, can be confirmed.

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Abstract  

This work reports on the medical subject headings that build-up the medical education field in Latin America, through the content and citation analysis ofEducation Medica y Salud (EMS). An attempt was made to establish the articulations between the citing and cited countries in the region. It was generally found that EMS was built-up by subjects of Medical Education, Health Manpower, Water Supply, and Health Policy. Although strongly citing/cited/indexed countries, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia have not established significant information flows among them. Further research lines are proposed.

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Abstract  

Health systems are reforming their structures and services world-wide. Both, developed and developing countries are searching for better organisation and functioning schemes of their health systems. The social service delivery system in developing countries is severely limited in its ability to respond and adjust to changing circumstances by institutional, organisational, and structural factors. As a result, different countries of the Latin American and Caribbean regions have developed a diversity of reform models. While international agencies and non-government academic organisations have been funding some of the health system reform initiatives among developing countries, no clear picture exists as to the results or impact of this support. Indicators related to knowledge administration, published results or shared experiences are needed to establish a diagnosis of the existing situation and to support decision making processes in terms of policy and research funding. This work presents the results of a bibliometric and webometric analysis on the production and distribution of the literature generated on health system reforms, as produced in or about Latin America and the Caribbean, for the period 1980–1999. Results indicated the limitations and low quality of local and regional databases to represent the productivity in the field. Data was obtained regarding the patterns of production and distribution of documents over time; the main countries and areas involved in health system reform processes; and the institutions behind the initiatives. The implications of the results derived from this research to health policy makers, researchers, librarians, database producers, and information scientists are discussed by the author.

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Scientometrics
Authors:
C. Macias-Chapula
,
Irma Rodea-Castro
, and
Nora Narvaez-Berthelemot

Abstract  

This work reports on the preliminary results of a bibliometric analysis of AIDS literature, as produced in or about Latin America and the Caribbean for the period 1980–1996. Two international and two regional secondary sources were used in order to obtain comparative analyses regarding for example, comprehensiveness of AIDS literature coverage and local/main frame visibility. Less than 1000 records were retrieved from each of the databases searched. Leading countries in AIDSLINE were Haiti, Brasil, Mexico and Puerto Rico. The distribution by year of publication showed a decrease in Haiti records, from 54 in 1983, to 4 in 1995. The rest of the countries either increased or maintained an average production throughout the years. Regional secondary information sources were less current and comprehensive in the field. Further lines of research are described by the authors.

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In the present paper, the Latin source of the Marian Sermons written by Jan of Szamotuły (c. 1480–1519) is identified and discussed. The collection of Sermons, survived in a manuscript dated to the early 16th century, consists of a number of texts concerning the Immaculate Conception, the Nativity, the Holy Name, and the Life of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Although closely related to medieval scholastic treatises in their structure and theological content, the Sermons were generally believed to be Jan of Szamotuły’s own work. However, the author of this paper argues that the actual source of this collection was a volume of sermons Stellarium coronae Benedictae Mariae Virginis written by the Hungarian Franciscan Pelbárt of Temesvár (c. 1435–1504). The two texts are compared with a view of identifying the characteristic features of the Polish translation. The paper also discusses some issues concerning the date and circumstances of the creation of the collection of Sermons.

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Philology is the servant of classical antiquity. And translation serves it by transposing it into another language. First translated into Latin (when originally written in Greek), later translated from Greek or Latin into the vernaculars, the works of the classical authors have reached modernity through the complex filter of philological interpretation and literary apprehension. P. Hummel analyzes the ways in which objectivity and subjectivity interact in the restitution of what is supposed to be the original and genuine meaning of the texts translated.

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Scientometrics
Authors:
C. Macias-Chapula
,
G. Sotolongo-Aguilar
,
B. Magde
, and
J. Solorio-Lagunas

Abstract  

The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary results of a research in progress regarding the subject content analysis of AIDS literature, as produced in or about the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. An AIDSLINE/OVID literature search was conducted to obtain only the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-geographic-terms related to the LAC region. The period of study was from 1982 to June, 1998. Indicators regarding the distribution of records throughout the years of study, as well as the subject, check tags, and subject/subheadings distribution patterns were analysed. This was done through the application of a modular bibliometric information system, as well as the applications of Biblio-Link for Windows, Version 1.2 1994–1997, Research Information Systems; Pro-Cite for Windows, Version 4.0.1 1995–1998, Research Information Systems; and Microsoft EXCEL 97, of 1985–1998, Microsoft Corporation. A total of 4124 records were obtained and analysed. In descending order, Brazil, Mexico, Haiti, Argentina and Puerto Rico, generated the highest number of citations. Highly ranked MeSH subject headings wereRisk Factors; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Sex Behavior, Support, Non U.S. Govt.; HIV Infections; andDeveloping Countries. Results demonstrate that major research concerns centred on the epidemiological aspects and transmission of AIDS; and more recently, on the prevention and control of the disease. A swith of the studies from male to female, and from middle age to adolescence was also observed. The authors provide further lines of research.

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