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A hajas sejtes leukémia korszerű diagnosztikája és kezelése

Hairy cell leukemia: diagnosis and treatment

Hematológia–Transzfuziológia
Authors:
Gabriella Illyés
,
Botond Timár
,
Csaba Bödör
,
Judit Demeter
, and
Noémi Nagy

–1800. 17 Turakhia S, Lanigan C, Hamadeh F, et al. Immunohistochemistry for BRAF V600E in the differential diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia vs other splenic B-cell lymphomas. Am J Clin Pathol. 2015

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Yevhen V. Kuzenko
,
Anatoly M. Romanuk
,
Olena Olegivna Dyachenko
, and
Olena Hudymenko

guidelines (Thermo Fisher Scientific), immunohistochemistry protocol was carried out [27] . Table I Types of antibody dilution, clone, and level of the protein expression in Warthin’s tumor

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. Immunohistochemical localization of OPN in the hippocampus The right hippocampi of six rats from the different groups were paraffin embedded and cut into 5-μm thick sections on a microtome. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the avidin–biotin complex

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Morrison RA Prayson 2000 Immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of neoplasms of the central nervous system Semin Diagn Pathol

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Magyar Onkológia
Authors:
Janina Kulka
,
Anna-Mária Tőkés
,
Adrienn Ildikó Tóth
,
Attila Marcell Szász
,
Andrea Farkas
,
Katalin Borka
,
Balázs Járay
,
Eszter Székely
,
Roland Istók
,
Gábor Lotz
,
Lilla Madaras
,
Anna Korompay
,
László Harsányi
,
Zsolt László
,
Zoltán Rusz
,
Béla Ákos Molnár
,
István Arthur Molnár
,
István Kenessey
,
Gyöngyvér Szentmártoni
,
Borbála Székely
, and
Magdolna Dank

protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry often does not predict oncogene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization Hum Pathol 34 1043 – 1047 . 16 Hayward , JL , Carbone

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Hungarian Medical Journal
Authors:
Pankaj Jain
,
Ramesh Roop Rai
,
Harsh Udawat
,
Sandeep Nijhawan
, and
Amit Mathur

Cytomegalovirus colitis has rarely been reported in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. The authors report a case of a 35-year-old male patient who presented with chronic inflammatory large bowel diarrhea and had endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. The diagnosis was based on positive CMV IgM serology, cytomegaly [inclusion bodies of CMV origin (confirmed on immunohistochemistry)]. He responded to ganciclovir clinically, endoscopically and histologically.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Ahmed Abdel-Latif
,
Sagar Goyal
,
Yogesh Chander
,
Ahmed Abdel-Moneim
,
Sabry Tamam
, and
Hanafy Madbouly

Nine fetuses and neonates from sheep and goats in Egypt were screened for pestiviruses using immunohistochemistry (IHC), virus isolation, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Two goat kids with typical border disease (BD) were positive for pestivirus infection by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using polyclonal anti-BDV serum but not when four different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were used. On inoculation in MDBK cells, a cytopathic bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was isolated from one of the two kids. PCR amplification followed by sequencing of the 5′-UTR region confirmed it as BVDV subtype 1b. Although the circulating virus in Egypt is considered to be BVDV 1a, this report confirms the existence of BVDV 1b in addition to BVDV 1a. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of a pestivirus from goats in Egypt and is probably the second report worldwide of a goat kid showing central nervous signs associated with border disease.

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Nineteen goslings with pulmonary and systemic aspergillosis were the subject of the study. The lungs and air sacs were the main sites affected by the disease, and were generally characterised by diffuse yellowish-white granulomas. In 7 cases with pulmonary and air-sac involvement the granulomas were scattered to the serosal linings of the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts, to the liver, spleen and kidneys, and in two cases also to the bursa of Fabricius, musculus (m.) longus colli and adventitia of aorta. The granulomas were often characterised by a necrotic centre surrounded by heterophils, macrophages, lymphocyte and plasma cells, and in late granulomas by multinucleated foreign-body giant cells, and again by an outer thin fibrous capsule. Numerous fungal hyphae were found within the necrotic debris of the granulomas by Gridley and PAS staining techniques. Immunohistochemistry reliably confirmed aspergillosis in all of the cases. Fungal elements in the lungs of goslings severely affected by the disease stained heavily within the centre of the granulomas, whereas few antigens reacted in the chronic cases. Fungal fragments, which were not discernible using routine fungal stains, reacted clearly in the cytoplasm of macrophages and giant cells. Thus, although fungal elements within the granulomas were histologically indicative of aspergillosis, immunohistochemistry also had to be applied to obtain a definitive diagnosis of the disease and to differentiate it from many of the filamentous fungi.

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Cricket brains were incubated in a saline containing nitric oxide (NO)-donor and phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX, which could activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) to increase cGMP levels in the targets of NO. The increase of cGMP was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. NO-induced cGMP immunohistochemistry revealed that many cell bodies of cricket brain showed cGMP immunoreactivity when preparations were treated with a saline containing 10 mM NO-donor SNP and phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX, but only a few cell bodies showed immunoreactivity when preparations were incubated without NO-donor. The concentration of cGMP in cricket brains were then measured by using cGMP-specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Cricket brains were treated with a saline containing 1 mM of NO-donor NOR3 and 1 mM IBMX. The cGMP levels in the brain were increased about 75% compared to control preparations that was treated with a cricket saline containing IBMX. The level of cGMP decreased about 40% when preparations were incubated NOR3 saline containing sGC inhibitor ODQ. These results indicate that NO activates sGC and increases the levels of cGMP in particular neurons of the cricket brain and that the level of cGMP would be kept a particular level, which might regulate synaptic efficacy in the neurotransmission.

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(Annelida) by immunohistochemistry and CLSM. Acta Zool. 83 , 33–48. Westheide W. Comparative analysis of the nervous systems in presumpive progenetic dinophilid and dorvelleid polychaetes

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