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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: S. Navakode, A. Weidner, R. Varshney, U. Lohwasser, U. Scholz, and A. Börner

Aniol, A., Gustafson, J.P. 1984. Chromosome location of genes controlling aluminium tolerance in wheat, rye and triticale. Can. J. Genet. Cytol. 26 :701

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The Westsik’s long-term crop rotation experiment was set up in 1929 at the Nyíregyháza Experimental Station (NE Hungary) on a slightly acidic Arenosol. Besides fallow crop rotation (CR), effects of different organic amendments (lupine as green manure, lupine as main crop, straw manure, and farmyard manure (FYM) were studied with or without N or NPK-fertilizers. The crop rotation consisted of rye, potato, lupine, and oat with common vetch. The soil of potato plots was analysed in 2019 at the 90th anniversary of Westsik’s crop rotation experiment.

The following chemical and microbiological soil parameters were determined: soil pH, available nutrient contents, organic carbon (OC) and nitrogen (ON) contents, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN), soil respiration, net nitrification, and activity of some soil enzymes.

In the CRs, the soil pHH2O varied from acidic to weakly alkaline and it largely differed from pHKCl. The results showed a significant increase in the content of nitrate, available phosphorus and potassium in most of the fertilized plots. Applying straw, green manure, or FYM significantly increased the OC and ON contents. The total count of cultivable bacteria increased upon the application of the organic manures. Combined application of straw manure and N-fertilization heavily improved the abundance of the microscopic fungi.

While all the applied organic manures significantly enhanced the MBC, the MBN increased only by the green manure amendment. Our results revealed higher soil respiration rate in the plots receiving straw or FYM than in the control. Both green manure and FYM elevated the net nitrification rate. Phosphatase, saccharase, urease, and dehydrogenase enzymes showed a hesitating response to the manure application in the different CRs.

The soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity correlated to most of the measured chemical parameters. Among microbiological properties, the MBC and MBN, as well as dehydrogenase and other enzyme activities displayed a positive correlation. Results proved the need for the exogenous application of organic matter in the form of organic manures to enhance the nutritional status and health of the soil.

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.J., Apolinarska, B., Gustafson, J.P. 1987. Introduction of the D-genome chromosomes from bread wheat into hexaploid triticale with a complete rye genome. Genome 29 :425–430. Gustafson J

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Miedaner, T., Schilling, A.G., 1996: Genetic variation of aggressiveness in individual field populations of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum tested on young plants of winter rye. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 102, 823

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) Immunolocalization of antifreeze protein in winter rye leaves, crowns, and roots by tissue printing. Plant Physiol. 110, 845-857. Immunolocalization of antifreeze protein in winter rye leaves, crowns, and roots by tissue printing

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Péter Mikó, Csaba Gyuricza, László Fenyvesi, Petra Földesi, and Balázs Szita

. Zöldtrágyázás 1986 Lazányi J. (2000): Sustainable rye production in the Westsik crop rotation experiment. Acta Agronomica Hungarica

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. — Marschner H. (1996): Differential response of rye, triticale, bread and durum wheat to zinc deficiency in calcareous soils. Plant and Soil 188:1–10. Marschner H. Differential response of

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Börner, A., Plaschke, J., Korzun, V., Worland, A. J. (1996): The relationships between the dwarfing genes of wheat and rye. Euphytica , 89 , 69–75. Worland A. J. The relationships

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Márton, L. , 2006. Effects of rainfall and fertilization on the yield of a winter rye monoculture in a long-term experiment. Agrokémia és Talajtan. 55 . 165–174. Márton L. Effects of

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Miedaner, T., Reinbrecht, C., Schilling, A.G.., 2000. Association among aggressiveness, fungal colonization, and mycotoxin production of 26 isolates of Fusarium graminearum in winter rye head blight. J. Plant Dis. Protect. 107: 124

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