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Introduction Because of the large body of studies on video game addiction, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) included Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in the research appendix of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and

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Functional impairment matters in the screening and diagnosis of gaming disorder

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Joël Billieux
,
Daniel L. King
,
Susumu Higuchi
,
Sophia Achab
,
Henrietta Bowden-Jones
,
Wei Hao
,
Jiang Long
,
Hae Kook Lee
,
Marc N. Potenza
,
John B. Saunders
, and
Vladimir Poznyak

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes Internet gaming disorder (IGD) in the “Emerging Measures and Models” section and the beta draft of the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) includes

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addiction called Internet gaming disorder (IGD; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ) or gaming disorder (GD; World Health Organization [WHO], 2019 ). Therefore, it is not appropriate to over-pathologize all online game players as homogenous

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, the DSM-5 and ICD-11 have recognized internet gaming disorder (IGD), a major subtype of PUI, as a non-substance (behavioral) addiction. Recently, PUI has received more attention during the COVID-19 pandemic, as individuals utilized the internet for

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Stepping back to advance: Why IGD needs an intensified debate instead of a consensus

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author:
Thorsten Quandt

In their insightful and important paper, Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2017 ) describe the current situation of the DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet gaming disorder (IGD) as “chaos and confusion.” The authors identify several problems, focusing on

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video gaming. Raised concerns related to video gaming led to the inclusion in Section III of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD; American Psychiatric

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Po-Ching Huang
,
Jung-Sheng Chen
,
Marc N. Potenza
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Amir H. Pakpour
,
Ji-Kang Chen
,
Yi-Ching Lin
,
Ching-Hsia Hung
,
Kerry S. O'Brien
, and
Chung-Ying Lin

gaming was assessed using Internet Gaming Disorder Scale Short Form. The correlations between PSPU, PSMU, PG, and physical activity measures across the three assessment time points are presented in Table 2 . In brief, PSPU, PSMU, and PG were

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Introduction Gaming addiction was first identified as Internet gaming disorder (IGD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ). Given the lack of empirical

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items in the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale Short-Form (IGDS9-SF) developed by Pontes and Griffiths ( 2014 , 2015 ). The IGDS9-SF is a short, nine-item psychometric tool adapted from the nine criteria that define Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) according

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Chung-Ying Lin
,
Maryam Ganji
,
Halley M. Pontes
,
Vida Imani
,
Anders Broström
,
Mark D. Griffiths
, and
Amir H. Pakpour

-5) working group led by Petry acknowledged that the healthy discussion among experts and the available empirical evidence led the DSM-5 to include a subtype of Internet addiction, Internet gaming disorder (IGD; Griffiths et al., 2016 ; Petry et

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