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some cases family, animal, or geographical names. 4 We use the greater-than sign not to mean ‘turns into’, but to symbolize that the base form is semantically ‘greater than’ the diminutive to its right. 5 Adjectives are optionally also subject to being

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likewise. He extends his arms and starts after the Girl.The Girl flees, - the Mandarin in her footsteps - his eyes fixed on her - his face distorted and begging like that of a sick animal.A chase begins. Bartók’s Hungarian word for the “chase,” “hajsza,” is

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, assimilant l’hiver à un animal malfaisant plutôt qu’à un être humain ; l’allusion serait alors renforcée par la formule in orbe (orbes désigne les anneaux du serpent, e.g. chez Luc. 6. 488). Cependant, l’image du reptile s’accorde mal avec le second verbe

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. (1932). Purposive Behavior in Animals and Men . New York: Century. Purposive Behavior in Animals and Men Wundt, Wilhelm (1903

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Evrasii v epochu srednevekovija. Arheologija SSSR. Moskva 1981. Pletnyov 2005 = V. Pletnyov : Buckles with animal images from North-East Bulgaria (9 th –10 th c. AD). ArchBulg 9 (2005) 75

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Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors: Szabolcs Czifra, Attila Kreiter, Éva Kovács-Széles, Mária Tóth, Orsolya Viktorik, and Beáta Tugya

pitcher goes so long to the well… Iron Age wells from the outskirts of Békéscsaba) . BMMK 30 ( 2007 ) 111 – 150 . Bóka–Tugya 2007 = G. Bóka – B. Tugya : Egy békéscsabai szkíta kút állatcsontleletei (Animal bone finds of a Scythian well in

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О Шарике, Жучке, Мурке и сером волке

ономасиологические заметки

Studia Slavica
Author: Viktor Mojszejenko

The author of the article gives a comparative description of Russian and other Slavonic denominations of domestic animals whose names derive from that of colour.

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The author of the article gives a comparative description of Russian and other Slavonic denominations of wild and domestic animals whose names derive from that of colour.

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Research from Luzhnica and Nishava]. Srpski etnografski zbornik XVI. Nikolić , M. Vladimir 1928: Životinje u narodnim pričama (iz Pirotskog okruga) [Animals in Folk Narratives in the Pirot Region]. Glasnik etnografskog

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The present paper examines the origin of two Tocharian animal names, assuming that they were borrowed from an oriental source. The Common Tocharian term for ‘poisonous snake, viper’ (Toch. A ārṣal, B arṣāklo) reproduces exactly the Turkic name *arsala:n ‘lion’, whereas the Tocharian B partākto ‘camel’ seems to represent a loanword from East Iranian *pardāk(u)-tā (pl.) ‘leopards’ (perhaps created by a contamination with Altaic *aktan- ‘a castrated animal’). The phonetic aspects of both derivations are unquestionable. The semantic differences may be explained by the fact that Proto-Tocharians borrowed names of two unknown exotic animals and later they wrongly identified the word with different animals, transferring the Turkish name for ‘lion’ into ‘poisonous snake, viper’ and the Iranian name for ‘leopard’ into ‘camel’. The same process is perfectly attested in Slavonic (e.g. Polish słoń ‘elephant’ < Turkish (dial.) aslan ‘lion’; Pol. wielbłąd ‘camel’ < Greek elephas, -antos ‘elephant’) and many other languages.

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