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, R. , Pallesen , S. , Carragher , N. , & Sakuma , H. ( 2017 ). Treatment of Internet gaming disorder: An international systematic review and CONSORT

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Hannah Schmidt
,
Dominique Brandt
,
Christian Meyer
,
Anja Bischof
,
Gallus Bischof
,
Anika Trachte
,
Bettina Besser
,
Svenja Orlowski
,
Samantha Schlossarek
,
Stefan Borgwardt
, and
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf

area of research that has not yet reached full clarification in terms of the classification and diagnostic criteria ( Fineberg et al., 2018 ; Griffiths, 2021 ; Mihajlov & Vejmelka, 2017 ). In 2013, Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) was included as a

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Sina Zadra
,
Gallus Bischof
,
Bettina Besser
,
Anja Bischof
,
Christian Meyer
,
Ulrich John
, and
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf

Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) is associated with an enhanced risk of addictive use, namely, Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD; Muller, Beutel, Egloff, & Wolfling, 2014 ). Although problematic Internet use or IA might include different main

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Mi Jung Rho
,
Jo-Eun Jeong
,
Ji-Won Chun
,
Hyun Cho
,
Dong Jin Jung
,
In Young Choi
, and
Dai-Jin Kim

(DSM-5; Section III, fifth edition) has proposed the criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD) ( American Psychiatric Association, 2012 ). Although many issues in the definition of IGD remain to be addressed, the DSM-5 has proposed that IGD is

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Ambiguities in existing Iranian national policies addressing excessive gaming

Commentary on: Policy responses to problematic video game use: A systematic review of current measures and future possibilities (Király et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Behrang Shadloo
,
Rabert Farnam
,
Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili
,
Marziyeh Hamzehzadeh
,
Hosein Rafiemanesh
,
Maral Mardaneh Jobehdar
,
Kamyar Ghani
,
Jamileh Rahimi
,
Arshiya Sangchooli
, and
Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar

Considering the scarcity of available science and controversies around effective policies addressing gaming disorder and its health-related consequences, Király et al. have conducted a systematic review on current evidence regarding this issue. We, a group of researchers in this field, would like to express our perspective from Iran. With rapid growth of gaming, Iran seems to be facing some specific policy issues and challenges, which are going to be reviewed in this short commentary.

Open access

per week. After one month, MMORPG-players reported playing more often than the other participants, worse physical health and sleep quality, and the game interfering more with their studies. Internet Gaming Disorder has been included in the

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. ( 2014 ). Internet Gaming Disorder . Current Addiction Reports , 1 ( 3 ), 177 – 185 . Ko , C. H. , Yen , J. Y. , Chen , S. H. , Wang , P. W. , Chen , C. S. & Yen , C. F

Open access

Abstract

Background and Aims

Internet Gaming Disorder, a subtype of Internet Addiction, is now classified in Section 3 of the DSM-5. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been suggested in treating Internet addiction as this modality has been shown to be an effective treatment for similar impulse control disorders. Given the daily and necessary use of the Internet and technology in general compared to other compulsive syndromes, a specialized form of CBT has been developed called Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Internet Addiction (CBT-IA). CBT-IA is a comprehensive three phase approach that includes behavior modification to control compulsive Internet use, cognitive restructuring to identify, challenge, and modify cognitive distortions that lead to addictive use, and harm reduction techniques to address and treat co-morbid issues associated with the disorder.

Methods

As the first model of its kind, this study examines 128 clients to measure treatment outcomes using CBT-IA. Clients were evaluated using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) to classify subjects and were administered twelve weekly sessions of CBT-IA. Treatment outcomes were measured at the end of the twelve weeks, one-month, three months and at six month post-treatment.

Results

Results showed that over 95% of clients were able to manage symptoms at the end of the twelve weeks and 78% sustained recovery six months following treatment.

Discussion and Conclusions

Results found that CBT-IA was effective at ameliorating symptoms associated with Internet addiction after twelve weekly sessions and consistently over one-month, three months, and six months after therapy. Further research implications such as investigating long-term outcome effects of the model with larger client populations and treatment differences among the subtypes of Internet addiction or with other cultural populations using CBT-IA are discussed.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Chih-Hung Ko
,
Orsolya Király
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
,
Mark D. Griffiths
,
Takahiro A. Kato
,
Masaru Tateno
, and
Ju-Yu Yen

, G. , & Potenza , M. N. ( 2014 ). A cognitive-behavioral model of internet gaming disorder: Theoretical underpinnings and clinical implications . Journal of Psychiatric Research , 58 , 7 – 11 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Joël Billieux
,
Adriano Schimmenti
,
Yasser Khazaal
,
Pierre Maurage
, and
Alexandre Heeren

. Ko , C.-H. , Yen , J.-Y. , Chen , S.-H. , Wang , P.-W. , Chen , C.-S. & Yen , C.-F. ( 2014 ). Evaluation of the diagnostic criteria of Internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 among young adults in Taiwan . Journal of Psychiatric Research

Open access