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– Law enforcement sometimes targets HR providers and people who use drugs, especially minorities – Nothing specifically stigmatizing in the media, mostly not positive, but a “personal choice” is emphasized

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era where gambling opportunities are widespread ( Gupta & Derevensky, 2000 ). While for most adolescents, gambling is an enjoyable and harmless activity, for a small minority, gambling can become problematic with severe negative consequences ( Calado

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results. Most of the participants showed a reliable improvement, however, a minority showed no reliable change or even a reliable deterioration. Exploratory growth models revealed more beneficial effects in more impaired individuals. The other potential

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et al., 2014 ; Rumpf et al., 2018 ; Starcevic & Billieux, 2018 ). Multiple studies have shown that male online game players are more likely to develop IGD than females ( Borgonovi, 2016 ). Studies have suggested that a minority of female and

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frequency at baseline and 30 days later. A small minority of the participants reported no gambling problems (16%), with the majority classed on the PGSI as experiencing low-risk (23%), moderate-risk (39%) and problem gambling (23%). Harrigan et al. (2010

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that SNS and video games can contribute to psychosocial impairments and behavioral dysfunction in a minority of users, including young adolescents who may use these technologies excessively and unhealthily given their current developmental stage

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Introduction Problematic internet gaming has been reported in many countries worldwide and is increasingly common among a small minority of adolescents ( Cheng, Cheung, & Wang, 2018 ; Feng, Ramo, Chan, & Bourgeois, 2017

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cue reactivity in the reward network of addictive subjects in comparison to healthy subjects was only found in a minority of the studies as summarized in a most recent review by Antons et al. (2020) . From this summary, the conclusion can be drawn

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to excessive Internet use ( Stavropoulos, Gentile, & Motti-Stefanidi, 2016 ). These repercussions illustrate the compelling need for at-risk individuals to be identified, helped, and (in a minority of cases) treated. This need is acknowledged

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completed their education with a college degree or higher (25.6%). A considerable proportion of participants were students during the data collection (38.4%), whereas 36.2% had a full-time or a part-time job, and 21.1% studied and worked. Only a minority of

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