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Abstract  

In recent papers, the authors have studied basic regularities of author self-citations. The regularities are related to the ageing, to the relation between self-citations and foreign citations and to the interdependence of self-citations with other bibliometric indicators. The effect of multi-authorship on citation impact has been shown in other bibliometric studies, for instance, by Persson et al. (2004). The question arises whether those regularities imply any relation between number of co-authors and the extent of author self-citations. The results of the present paper confirm the common notion of such effects only in part. The authors show that at the macro level multi-authorship does not result in any exaggerate extent of self-citations.

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Scientometrics
Authors:
Liwen Vaughan
and
Wolfgang Glänzel

Summary  

The objective of the present study is twofold: (1) to show the aims and means of quantitative interpretation of bibliographic features in bibliometrics and their re-interpretation in research policy, and (2) to summarise the state-of-art in self-citation research. The authors describe three approaches to the role of author self-citations and possible conflicts arising from the different perspectives. From the bibliometric viewpoint we can conclude that that there is no reason for condemning self-citations in general or for removing them from macro or meso statistics; supplementary indicators based on self-citations are, nonetheless, useful to understand communication patterns.

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Summary This study examines the bibliometrics of the controversial scientific literature of Polywater research, focusing on publication types (books, journal publications, conference proceedings, and technical reports). Publication (P) frequency is used to measure publication “shape' or pattern and output, citations per publication (CPP) for impact, author self-citations (SC) and uncited publications (UP) for their effect on P and CPP. Findings show an epidemic publication pattern, journal publications with the highest P, books with the highest CPP, and insignificant SC and UP. Comparisons to several non-controversial scientific literatures suggest that these findings may be common to other controversial scientific literatures.

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.: On the heterogeneity and classification of author self-citations. J. Assoc. Am. Soc. Inform. Sci., 1982, 33 (5), 281–284. 3 Glänzel, W., Debackere, K., Thijs

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Scientometrics
Authors:
T. Dewitt
,
R. Nicholson
, and
M. Wilson

Abstract  

Citation data have been collected for a large number of chemists at American universities. The principal objectives are to examine the use of citations as a tool in the study of sociology of chemical research and to determine the feasibility and accurancy of using automatically generated data. Past results in each of these areas, as well as a projection of future uses of citation data, are presented. First, a pilot study is described and some tentative conclusions discussed. The method used minimizes some of the most commonly-expressed criticism of citation data, such as multiple author, self-citations, etc. An effort has been made to establish the accuracy of automatically generated citation data. This project uses as a base for comparison the complete bibliographies of several thousand chemists. Several different citation indices are compared with other indicators commonly employed in discussions of the characteristics of the field of chemistry. The results generally support the idea that citations are meaningful. However, they also reveal some problems which require that great care be exercised in the use of citation data. The use of citation data to observe a chemistry subfield over time also is illustrated.

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Abstract  

This paper revisits an aspect of citation theory (i.e., citer motivation) with respect to the Mathematical Review system and the reviewer’s role in mathematics. We focus on a set of journal articles (369) published in Singularity Theory (1974–2003), the mathematicians who wrote editorial reviews for these articles, and the number of citations each reviewed article received within a 5 year period. Our research hypothesis is that the cognitive authority of a high status reviewer plays a positive role in how well a new article is received and cited by others. Bibliometric evidence points to the contrary: Singularity Theorists of lower status (junior researchers) have reviewed slightly more well-cited articles (2–5 citations, excluding author self-citations) than their higher status counterparts (senior researchers). One explanation for this result is that lower status researchers may have been asked to review ‘trendy’ or more accessible parts of mathematics, which are easier to use and cite. We offer further explanations and discuss a number of implications for a theory of citation in mathematics. This research opens the door for comparisons to other editorial review systems, such as book reviews written in the social sciences or humanities.

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Abstract  

A sample of 80 Hungarian scientists, authors or co-authors of a total number of 6273 papers—published between 1930–1976—has been analysed. Citation data to eachpaper were collected form the 1964–76 SCI's by manual search. Citation counts were distinguished with respect to the following categories: (I) the set of cited authors has element(s) common with the set of citing authors (self citation), (II) condition I is not satisfied, but the cited author under study and at least one of the citing authors were co-authors prior to the publication of the cited paper, (III) none of the former criteria is satisfied. The yearly average citation frequency of a paper was not corrected for obsolescence, since there is no evidence that the decay of citation frequency with time is independent of the absolute citedness of the paper. Individual performance has been measured (a) by the sum of the vearly average typeIII fractional citation frequencies over all of the author's papers, (b) by the sum of the yearly average citation frequency normalized to one single-authored paper per year over the period of the author's activity, (c) by the same as ina, but summed up only over the most highly cited papers scattering upwards from the individual's own average, (d) by the fractional authorship, and (e) by the number of items in the author's publication list. The first three parameters seem to be applicable in measuring the utility of the individual's scientific contribution with slightly different emphasis on different aspects. These parameters are uncorrelated with those measuring the output of individuals.

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coauthorship. Scientometrics, 2010, 85 (3), 741–754. 17 Schubert, A., Glänzel, W., Thijs, B.: The weight of author self-citations. A fractional approach to self

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://sherlock.berkely.edu/asis96/asis96.html . Lawani , S. M. 1982 On the heterogeneity and classification of author self-citations Journal of the American Society for

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. Sarasvady , S. 2002 The other side of the coin: The intricacies of author self-citations Scientometrics 54 2 285 – 290

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