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this process through an emphasis on its nature as unrationalized sound. Music is always both … . 4 György Ligeti is known for his defence of musical modernism and its values, 5 as well as his unequivocal statements on the autonomy of music and its

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You tell stories to children to make them fall asleep, and to adults so that they will wake up. Le Grand Macabre is definitely for adults only. But what kind of story does György Ligeti tell in his opera? Is it a dystopian tale, or rather one from

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labyrinthine excursions. Plate 1. György Ligeti, Kylwiria notebook, table of contents, 1 (©Vera Ligeti, with kind permission) The genesis of the country is embedded in a mythological narrative and linked to dates of great personal symbolism. The starting point

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Duchesneau . “ A Kinship Foreseen: Ligeti and African Music, Simha Arom in Conversation ,” in György Ligeti: Of Foreign Lands and Strange Sounds , ed. by Louise Duchesneau , and Wolfgang Marx ( Woodbridge : The Boydell Press, 2011 ), 107 – 122

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“Some Sort of Machine without a Body”

György Ligeti and Antoinette Vischer Explore the Modern Harpsichord

Studia Musicologica
Author:
Elisabeth Reisinger

the end. 1 (Antoinette Vischer, 1968) In early 1968, György Ligeti completed Continuum for harpsichord solo, a short piece lasting no more than four minutes. It stands out as one of the few twentieth-century compositions for the harpsichord that has

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The notion of sound (Klang) has been discussed intensely during the last 200 years. Similarly, in the writings of György Ligeti, timbre (Klangfarbe) is one of the crucial terms. The aim of this text is to reconsider the role of timbre and the relationship between timbre, space, and time in Ligeti’s music. With an analysis of Atmosphères and the first movement of the Piano Concerto, the discussion also includes two further important notions: process and threshold.

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Hungarian composers in the past very rarely reflected on György Ligeti’s oeuvre. Concentrating on their own struggles with musical modernism and avant-garde after 1956, they considered Ligeti one of the most important Hungarian composers of their time, but didn’t really understand his concepts and techniques. My study aims at interpreting this misunderstanding through the analysis of orchestral works by Ligeti’s best Hungarian friend, András Szőllősy (1921–2007). For contemporary Hungarian musicians and critics, Szőllősy’s compositions represented the counterpart of the great émigré’s life work.

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, that lonely creature sitting in the middle of an awe-inspiring dwelling, could have been a Latrodectus – a Black Widow? Works Cited Cadagin , Joseph. “ ’Everything is Chance’: György Ligeti in Conversation with John Tusa, 28 October 1997 ,” in “ I

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Regarding György Ligeti’s relation to ethnic music, his oeuvre can be divided into three periods. Until 1956 he used East European folk music in the manner of Hungarian composition of the 1940s and 1950s, but upon leaving Hungary he apparently rejected folkloristic inspiration. In his late period from 1978 on, however, ethnic musics became again central to his creative work, albeit in a basically different way than in his youth. This article provides an overview of Ligeti’s early folkloristic pieces and a brief characterization of his use of elements of Eastern European folklore in Le Grand Macabre, Hungarian Rock, Passacaglia ungherese and the Horn Trio. Finally, it traces back Ligeti’s “lamento melody,” that appears for the first time in the last movement of the Horn Trio, to certain types of the Hungarian folk lament. Ligeti’s references to folklore do not mean an idealization of his past, but are rather signs of an ambivalent attitude toward his own roots, in which nostalgic longing, ironic distancing, and desperate mourning are equally present.

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György Ligeti was very interested in many artistic and scientific fields and drew inspiration for his compositional work from them (his engagement with mathematics – particularly fractal geometry and chaos theory – is perhaps the best known). In

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