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Dr. Barnabás Nagy

(1921–2020), a naturalist, orthopterologist, agrozoologist and forward-looking ecologist covered a rich scientific career. In commemoration of his significant contribution to entomology, we attempt to shed some light on a selection of his achievements. While devoted to his chosen insect order, Orthoptera, he was sensitive also to problems coming from everyday’s practice in controlling pests in agriculture. Consequently, he dealt with various pest species, belonging to a variety of insect taxa (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera). He always put the actual problem in ecological context. This may have helped him to recognize the need for an ecological approach in plant protection and to develop the pioneering concept of biological / ecological pest management, published in Hungarian, as early as in 1957. When arguing for his concept, he criticized the surplus usages of toxic pesticides and provided guidelines for facilitating the beneficial activity of the natural enemies of pests. This way he prepared the way for integrated pest management (IPM), preceding the international mainstream of his age. He held an active part in the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC), as a founder of the International Working Group of Ostrinia (IWGO), and was the Head of the Department of Zoology of the Plant Protection Institute, Budapest, Hungary. He held several positions in the Hungarian Entomological Society (President, vice-President, Secretary, committee member), to that society he was engaged for 80 years. Here we cite only some of his most important, original entomological papers. He regularly published also in journals for popular science and gave lectures for the young generations of entomologists.

Curriculum vitae in a nutshell

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disks used were CAZ, cefepime (CFP), PRL, PRL/tazobactam (TZP), aztreonam (ATM), imipenem (IPM), and meropenem (MEM). The sizes of the inhibition zones were interpreted according to CLSI M100-S27 and the organisms were reported as sensitive, intermediate

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Research Notes 15 1 Reckhaus, P. M. and Andriamasintseheno, H. E. (1995): Development of an IPM strategy to fight RYMV and

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Hollywood.] IPM, Aug 2009. [Hungarian] 13 Henry, E.: Boy, 15, filmed carrying out surgery. The Telegraph, June 23, 2007. 14

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. (2000): Manipulation of wavelength-dependent behaviour of insects: an IPM tool to impede insects and restrict epidemics of insect-borne viruses. Virus Research 71, 213-220. Manipulation of wavelength-dependent behaviour of

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Stored-product IPM . Kluwer Academic Publishers. Dordreech, The Netherlands. pp. 193 – 227 . Nakato , G.V. 2010 . Effects of diatomaceous earth on cowpea field

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. (2016): Relative fitness of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on seven host plants: A perspective for IPM in Brazil J. Insect Sci. 16, 1–5. 10.1093/jisesa/iev158

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. 2009 23 136 157 Katti G., Pasalu I. C., Varma N. R. G. and Dhandapani N. (2001): Quantification of natural biological control in rice ecosystem for possible exploitation in rice IPM. Indian J. Ent. 63, 439

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Baker, B.P., Benbrook, C.M., Groth, E. & Lutz Benbrook, K. (2002): Pesticide residues in conventional, integrated pest management (IPM)-grown and organic foods: insight from three US data sets. Fd

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157 163 Dhawan, A. K. (1999): Major insect pests of cotton and their integrated management. In: R. K. Updadhyay, K. G. Mukerji and R. L. Rajak (eds): IPM System in Agriculture

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