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Anglo-American and French, as well as German, Spanish and Hungarian variations to “Law and Literature” are surveyed for that as to the nature of the discipline some conclusions can be formulated. Accordingly, “Law and Literature” recalls that which is infinite in fallibility and which is not transparent in its simplicity, that is, the situation confronted that we may not avoid deciding about despite the fact that we may not get to a final understanding. What is said thereby is that “Law and Literature” is just a life-substitute. Like an artificial ersatz, it helps one to see out from what he/she cannot surpass. What it is all about is perhaps not simply bridging the gap between the law’s proposition and the case of law, with unavoidable tensions confronting the general and the individual, as well as the abstract and the concrete. Instead, it is more about live meditation, professional methodicalness stepped back in order to gain further perspectives and renewed reflection from a distance, so that the underlying reason for the legal (and especially judicial) profession can be recurrently rethought. In a fictional form, literature is the symbol and synonym of reflected life, a field where genuine human fates can be represented. Thereby, at the same time it is a substitute for theology, rooted in earthly existence as a supply to foster feeling kinds of, or substitutes to, transcendence.

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In this paper I scrutinize the origin of the concept of dreams influenced by mens’ daylightexperience. To this end I showcase some texts from Hellenistic literature until English Renaissance which to my mind can be brought into connection with each other in terms of realism of dream-vision. By looking on the common traits one can arrive at the conclusion that the dream-realism is a concept which first became popular in the Hellenism and it was from there that it took its long way through ages.

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The paper, as its title-Hamlet and Don Quixote in the intertextual poetic world of Turgenev's novel, Rudin-suggests, attempts at elucidating the Hamlet and Don Quixote problematics from a poetic point of view. This approach refuses to rely on the analysis of Turgenev's interpretation of the figures of Hamlet and Don Quixote as presented in the writer's essay Hamlet and Don Quixote. Instead, it proposes a close reading of the Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Don Quixote intertexts evolving in the Turgenevian novel under scrutiny, with special attention to the common aspects of their poetic formulation. These poetic analogues lead to a parallel intertextual portraying of Hamlet and Don Quixote as semantically attached to the figure of Rudin. The interpretation of the Hamlet-intertext places at center stage the Mouse-trap scene in its relation to the descriptions of the appearance of the Ghost at the beginning of the play and Hamlets's revenge at its end, with the semantic implications of their motifs of word and deed. The analysis gets to the conclusion of a semantic kinship between Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Quixote formed in the two entwined intertexts with a dominance of the motif of the freedom of artistic creation. The theoretical dimension of the reading touches upon the problematics of mirroring, reflecting and-in a broader sense-representation.

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Stiller, J. Nettle, D. and Dunbar, R. I. M. (2003): The small world of Shakespeare's plays. Human Nature , 14, 397-408. The small world of Shakespeare's plays. Human Nature

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. The Story of British Shorthand . London , 1951 . Davidson 2009 D avidson A. Shakespeare in Shorthand. The Textual

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Ausdrucks [Spech melody as a mean of emotional expression] . Folia Phoniatrica , 15 , 89 – 98 . 47. Shakespeare , W. ( 1978 ): Lear király . Vörösmarty Mihály fordítását Mészöly Dezső

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Hamlet, the last of Liszt’s Weimar symphonic poems, stands out from the others in the sheer detail of its references to the text of Shakespeare’s play. This paper considers how Liszt revised the symphonic poems in order to tighten the relationship between music and drama against the context of his encounter with a renowned and innovative Shakespearian actor, Bogumil Dawison. It demonstrates that the revisions made to Hamlet concerned incorporating extra ’scenes’ from the play using techniques associated with incidental music. Liszt also added programmatic instructions directly related to Dawison’s portrayal. All of this allows us to reconsider the position of Hamlet within the symphonic poems, as a forerunner to the highly programmatic Two Episodes from Lenau’s Faust and the melodramas that Liszt would compose immediately afterwards.

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Literature F oucault , Michel 1980 : Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972–1977 . New York : Vintage Books . K houry , Yvette K. 2008 : Akhir Yom (The Last Day): A Localized Arabic Adaptation of Shakespeare’s

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