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The paper, as its title-Hamlet and Don Quixote in the intertextual poetic world of Turgenev's novel, Rudin-suggests, attempts at elucidating the Hamlet and Don Quixote problematics from a poetic point of view. This approach refuses to rely on the analysis of Turgenev's interpretation of the figures of Hamlet and Don Quixote as presented in the writer's essay Hamlet and Don Quixote. Instead, it proposes a close reading of the Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Don Quixote intertexts evolving in the Turgenevian novel under scrutiny, with special attention to the common aspects of their poetic formulation. These poetic analogues lead to a parallel intertextual portraying of Hamlet and Don Quixote as semantically attached to the figure of Rudin. The interpretation of the Hamlet-intertext places at center stage the Mouse-trap scene in its relation to the descriptions of the appearance of the Ghost at the beginning of the play and Hamlets's revenge at its end, with the semantic implications of their motifs of word and deed. The analysis gets to the conclusion of a semantic kinship between Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Quixote formed in the two entwined intertexts with a dominance of the motif of the freedom of artistic creation. The theoretical dimension of the reading touches upon the problematics of mirroring, reflecting and-in a broader sense-representation.

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. The Story of British Shorthand . London , 1951 . Davidson 2009 D avidson A. Shakespeare in Shorthand. The Textual

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Literature F oucault , Michel 1980 : Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972–1977 . New York : Vintage Books . K houry , Yvette K. 2008 : Akhir Yom (The Last Day): A Localized Arabic Adaptation of Shakespeare’s

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Karl Goldmark (1830–1915) was undoubtedly one the most influential composers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and through his first opera – The Queen of Sheba – he was also very well-known abroad. This opera, with its very fashionable oriental subject, was first performed in Vienna in 1875 and was one of the greatest successes of the period. After Merlin (1886) and The Cricket on the Hearth (1896), a “song-opera” strongly influenced by the Biedermeier-period, Goldmark wrote three operas over the next ten years. A Prisoner of War (libretto E. Schlicht, premiered in 1899 in Vienna) was based on one episode of the Iliad. In this short opera the composer tried to express the change of Achilles’ soul, but he mostly failed due to a relatively weak and conventional libretto and vague musical style. In the following opera, Götz von Berlichingen (libretto A. M. Willner, premiered 1902) the libretto is also the weakest element of the work and the whole opera reminds one of Meyerbeer ’s operas. The composer found a renewed inspiration during the work on his last opera – The Winter’s Tale (libretto by Alfred Maria Willner after Shakespeare, premiered in 1907 in Vienna). This fairy tale opera is full of interesting musical moments and elements written in Goldmark’s late style and is still attractive for the opera-going public.

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Romanian of bawdy multilingual puns in two editions of Shakespeare’s works. The first complete Romanian edition of Shakespeare’s works was produced under the communist regime, and it was meant to replace the pre-war “cosmopolitan” translations, “recreating

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Hamlet, the last of Liszt’s Weimar symphonic poems, stands out from the others in the sheer detail of its references to the text of Shakespeare’s play. This paper considers how Liszt revised the symphonic poems in order to tighten the relationship between music and drama against the context of his encounter with a renowned and innovative Shakespearian actor, Bogumil Dawison. It demonstrates that the revisions made to Hamlet concerned incorporating extra ’scenes’ from the play using techniques associated with incidental music. Liszt also added programmatic instructions directly related to Dawison’s portrayal. All of this allows us to reconsider the position of Hamlet within the symphonic poems, as a forerunner to the highly programmatic Two Episodes from Lenau’s Faust and the melodramas that Liszt would compose immediately afterwards.

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. New Delhi : Oxford University Press . Crystal , D. 2005 . Pronouncing Shakespeare: The Globe Experiment . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press

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. P. & Fels , D. I. 2009 . ‘Suit the Action to the Word, the Word to the Action’: An Unconventional Approach to Describing Shakespeare’s Hamlet . Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness Vol. 103 . 3 – 178

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. 487 – 508 . Magnusson , Lynne . 1992 . The rhetoric of politeness and Henry VIII . Shakespeare Quarterly 43 . 391 – 409

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