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. Mathivanan , N. , Prabavathy , V. R. and Vijayanandraj , R. ( 2005 ): Application of talc formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula and Trichoderma viride Pers. ex. S. F gray decrease the sheath blight disease and enhance the plant growth and

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Siderophores are low molecular weight (<1000 D) iron chelating compounds produced by microorganisms. Production of siderophore is a device of antagonism as by virtue of the capacity of siderophore production, a microorganism competes for Fe (III) with the others. Production of siderophores by 9 different soil fungi and wood-decay fungi was studied following CAS - assay and CAS - agar plate assay. Optimization for the production of siderophores was done by varying the levels of pH and Fe (III) concentrations in the low nutrient medium. All the test fungi could produce siderophores, though the degree of production recorded to be very low both in Botryodiplodia theobromae and in Fusarium spp. On the other hand, all the species of Trichoderma showed their excellency in siderophore production. The optimum pH for production of siderophores remained at neutral pH level though the range varied from pH 6.0-8.0. The optimum range of the concentration of Fe (III) required for siderophore production was recorded to be 1.5-21.0 µM. However, the stress condition of iron might be a decisive factor for siderophore production.

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Seed extracts of 50 plant species belonging to different families were evaluated for their ability to inhibit growth of Trichoderma viride in vitro. Of the various seed extracts, the seed extracts of Harpullia cupanioides (Roxb) belonging to Sapindaceae family exhibited very high antifungal activity. The seed extract of H. cupanioides strongly inhibited the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, Curvularia lunata, Colletotrichum musae and Alter­naria alternata. Seed extract of H. cupanioides retained its antifungal acti­vity even after heating at 100 °C for 10 min or autoclaving at 121 °C for 20 min. For partial purification of antifungal proteins, H. cupanioides seed extract was subjected to ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 column. The fractions from sephadex G-200 were individually tested for their antifungal activity against T. viride. SDS-PAGE analysis of the fractions from Sephadex-G200 column indi­cat­ed that the fractions with antifungal activity contained a 68-kDa band as well as other low molecular weight protein bands. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 68-kDa protein (13 residues) was determined by Edman degradation. However, comparison with sequences in the GenBank database (Swiss Prot) did not reveal any homology with known protein sequences.

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Ascochyta blight (Ascochyta rabiei) is one of the most devastating diseases of chickpea. The biocontrol potential of fungal antagonists, Chaetomium globosum, Trichoderma viride, Acremonium implicatum were explored under in vitro and in vivo. A. implicatum isolate-1 overgrew the host mycelium and caused lysis, while A. implicatum isolate-2 produced inhibition zone. C. globosum profusely overgrew the mycelium of A. rabiei and T. viride showed overgrowth and profuse sporulation. Bioassay with culture filtrates of all the antagonists resulted in significant inhibition of pycnidiospore germination and reduction in colony development of A. rabiei. Syringe filtered culture filtrate when amended in liquid broth medium also significantly reduced the mycelial growth. Bioassay of culture filtrates under glass house conditions, although brought reduction in disease development in both pre- and post-inoculation sprays, but C. globosum was the most effective antagonist causing 73.12% reduction in disease index when used as post inoculation spray. Under in vitro conditions C. globosum caused 48.59% reduction in colony diameter and 70.86% reduction in pycnidiospore germination.

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. 10 189 197 Howell, J. A. & Stuck, J. D. (1975): Kinetics of Solka Floc cellulose hydrolysis by Trichoderma viride cellulase. Biotechnol. Bioengng

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: L. Kredics, Zsuzsanna Antal, Ilona Dóczi, L. Manczinger, F. Kevei, and Elisabeth Nagy

94 Loeppky, C. B., Sprouse, R. F., Carlson, J. V., Everett, E. D.: Trichoderma viride peritonitis. South Med J 76 , 798-799 (1983). Trichoderma

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: L. Kredics, Zsuzsanna Antal, A. Szekeres, L. Hatvani, L. Manczinger, Cs. Vágvölgyi, and Erzsébet Nagy

Rodriguez-Kabana, R., Kelley, W. D., Curl, E. A.: Proteolytic activity of Trichoderma viride in mixed cultures with Sclerotium rolfsii in soil. Can J Microbiol 24 , 487-490 (1978

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Al-Fattah , A ., Dababat , A . and Sikora , A . ( 2007 ): Use of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride for the biological control of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato . Jordan. J. Agri. Sci . 3 , 297 – 309 . Al-hazmi , A. S

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: L. Kredics, Zsuzsanna Antal, A. Szekeres, L. Manczinger, Ilona Dóczi, F. Kevei, and Elisabeth Nagy

3751 3755 Jacobs, F., Byl, B., Bourgeois, N., Coremans-Pelseneer, J., Florquin, S., Depré, G., Van de Stadt, J., Adler, M., Gelin, M., Thys, J. P.: Trichoderma viride infection

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Kumar, A. and Marimuthu, T. (1997): Decomposed coconut coirpith - a conducive medium for colonization of Trichoderma viride. Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica 32, 51-58. Decomposed coconut coirpith - a conducive

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