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-recapture methods to violations of the closure assumption. Ecology 80:2517–2525. Kendall W.L. Robustness of closed capture-recapture methods to violations of the closure assumption

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Rokas, A., Melika, G., Abe, Y., Nieves-Aldrey, J. L., Cook, J. M., Stone, G. N. (2003) Lifecycle closure, lineage sorting and hybridization revealed in a phylogenetic analysis of European oak gallwasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae: Cynipini) using

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors:
Ivanka Fedina
,
Maya Velitchkova
,
Katya Georgieva
,
Dimitrina Nedeva
, and
H. Çakırlar

Negash, L., Bjömn, L. O. (1986) Stomatal closure by ultraviolet radiation. Physiol. Plant. 66 , 360–364. Bjömn L. O. Stomatal closure by ultraviolet radiation

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1 13 Reed, B. H., Wilk, R., Lipshitz, H. D. (2001) Downregulation of Jun kinase signaling in the amnioserosa is essential for dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo

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11 18 Valverde, T. and J. Silvertown. 1997. Canopy closure rate and forest structure. Ecology 78:1555-1562. Canopy closure rate and forest structure

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, sand, basalt, marl). To determine the extent of differences in each species’ examined factors, in cases of each continuous variable (e.g., canopy closure and age of forest subcompartments), we used a single-variable analysis of variance (ANOVA). For

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. Konvicka, R. Tropek, J. Benes, I.H. Tuf and J. Tufova. 2008. Does closure of traditionally managed open woodlands threaten epigeic invertebrates? Effects of coppicing and high deer densities. Biol. Conserv. 141: 827

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors:
H. Sytykiewicz
,
P. Czerniewicz
,
Iwona Sprawka
,
Sylwia Goławska
,
G. Chrzanowski
, and
B. Leszczyński

-triggered hypersensitive response and stomatal closure. J. Exp. Bot. (doi:10.1093/jxb/erq189). Zybailov, B., Friso, G., Kim, J., Rudella, A., Rodríguez, V. R., Asakura, Y., Sun, Q., van Wijk, K. J. (2009) Large scale comparative

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The photosynthetic responses induced by NaCl were investigated in the 7H Asakaze komugi/Manas wheat/barley addition line developed in the Agricultural Research Institute, Martonvásár, Hungary, in the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Asakaze komugi (Akom) and wheat line Martonvásári 9 kr1 (Mv9kr1) and in the barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cv. Manas. An increase in the NaCl concentration of the nutrient solution to 200 mmol L−1 resulted in considerable stomatal closure and a decreased net CO2 assimilation rate (A) in the wheat genotypes, while the changes in these parameters were less significant for barley and the 7H addition line. Parallel with this, a relatively high non-stomatal limitation (L m) of A was observed in wheat genotypes, which was not significant in Manas or the wheat-barley addition line at this level of salt stress. At severe stress (300 mM L−1 NaCl concentration) A and stomatal conductance were strongly inhibited in all the genotypes examined; however, L m was less significant in the addition line and its parental wheat genotype. These preliminary results suggest that the 7H Akom/Manas addition line might be a good candidate for improving the salt tolerance of wheat in the future, and encourage further detailed physiological analysis of this addition line.

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The interaction between salinity (8 and 12 dS m −1 ) and three levels (40, 80 and 120 kg ha −1 ) of different forms of nitrogen (NO 3 , NH 4 + and NO 3 + NH 4 + ) were studied in Brassica juncea cv. RH-30. The plants were salinized with 8 and 12 dS m −1 at 35 and 55 days after sowing. The relative water content (RWC), water potential (Ψ w ) and osmotic potential (Ψ s ) exhibited a marked decline under salinity stress. The application of the combined form (NO 3 + NH 4 + ) of nitrogen (120 kg ha −1 ) considerably improved the water status and mitigated the adverse effect of salinity on growth. The salinity-induced osmotic effect led to stomatal closure and caused a substantial reduction in net photosynthetic rate (P N ), stomatal conductance (g s ) and transpiration rate (E) at the pre-flowering and flowering stages (45 and 65 DAS). Salinity effects were considerably moderated by additional nitrogen supply, which varied with the source of nitrogen, the level of salinity/fertilizer and the stage of plant growth. The inhibition in photosynthesis was relatively greater in ammonium-fed (NH 4 + ) than in nitrate-fed (NO 3 ) plants, while the transpiration rate was relatively lower in nitrate-fed plants grown either with or without saline water irrigation. The nitrate form of nitrogen @ 120 kg ha −1 proved best in alleviating the adverse effect of salinity on photosynthesis and transpiration at both the growth stages.

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