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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
K. Shiraishi
,
S. Ko
,
T. Ban-nai
,
H. Arae
,
K. Ayama
,
P. Zamostyan
,
N. Tsigankov
,
I. Los
, and
V. Korzun

Abstract  

Daily intakes of 134Cs and 137Cs in Ukrainians were estimated in relation to the health effects on habitants after the Chernobyl accident. Two hundred and sixty-eight diet samples were collected from 25 oblasts (regions) using a duplicate portion method. For Ukrainians, the range and median daily intakes of 137Cs were 0.53–571 and 8.8 Bq per person, respectively. Intakes of 134Cs were also detected in highly 137Cs contaminated areas. Daily intakes of 134Cs were in the range of not detected to 3.6 Bq per person. Using the highest radiocesium intakes, annual effective doses for 134Cs and 137Cs were estimated to be 2.5·10−2 and 2.7 mSv, respectively.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
K. Shiraishi
,
Y. Muramatsu
,
I. Los
,
V. Korzun
,
N. Tsigankov
, and
P. Zamostyan

Abstract  

Total diet samples for Ukrainians and Japanese were collected by duplicate portion studies in relation to the Chernobyl accident. Stable iodine and bromine in the diet samples were determined by using ICP-MS after chemical separation. Daily intakes of iodine for Ukrainians and Japanese were found to be 110±104 and 1770±1610 μg per person per day, respectively. Daily intakes of Br were as follows: Ukrainians 3.47±2.12 mg; Japanese 11.4±2.4 mg. Daily iodine intake in Ukrainians was lower than the recommended dietary allowance (150 μg) and showed the relationship of high prevalence of goiter in this area.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
R. Poličnik
,
D. Pokorn
,
D. Kulnik
,
D. Mičetić-Turk
, and
C. Hlastan-Ribič

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the energy and dietary intake of pre-school children (PSC) in Central Slovenia.A total of 129 PSC, average age 4.2 years, were included. The intake was assessed with the use of three-day weighed food records.The average daily energy intake of PSC was 5881.0±1394.2 kJ (1405.2 kcal). The average estimated daily intakes of macronutrients were: protein 13.9%E, fats 28.8%E and carbohydrates 57.1%E. The average daily intake of vitamins were: A 0.2±0.2 mg, E 11.5±3.8 mg, B1 0.9±1.0 mg, B2 1.0±0.2 mg, B6 1.2±0.4 mg, D 1.1±0.7 μg, C 104.5±46.2 mg, folates 176.4±63.1 μg and minerals: potassium 2276.4±762.4 mg, sodium 1951.4±583.0 mg, phosphorous 910.8±260.0 mg, zinc 7.3±2.1 mg, iodine 104.0±32.9 μg, calcium 580.1±170.6 mg, magnesium 249.6±91.2 mg in iron 9.1±3.4 mg.The average daily energy intake and average estimated daily intake of macronutrients of PSC were comparable to recommendations. We found low average estimated daily intake of vitamin D, folates and relative high intake of sodium in PSC diet.

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Abstract  

Thorium-232 and238U contents in four food groups were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Daily intakes of232Th and238U for Japanese were estimated to 2.22 mBq and 15.5 mBq per person, respectively. Furthermore, preliminary estimations were made for the effects of imported foods on internal exposures for Japanese.

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Abstract  

The concentrations of trace elements As, Br, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, Se and Zn in Chinese foodstuffs were determined by instrumental or radiochemical neutron activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometric methods. 1198 samples including 20–25 kinds of main foodstuffs were analyzed. The results are given and the daily intake of the trace elements for population groups concerned have been calculated.

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Abstract  

Excess dietary intake may increase the risk for the hyperthyroidism in the elderly. This study investigated iodine dietary intake by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) analyzing duplicate portion diet and fortified table salt samples. Duplicate diet samples were obtained from a group of twenty-five steel mill workers from the city of São Paulo, over a 3-day period. The samples were freeze dried, mixed and homogenized. Fortified table salt brands were collected from the market and were analyzed with no pre-treatment. Assays for the iodine concentration in the table salt samples revealed values between 24 to 65 mg/kg. The average iodine daily intake for the worker’s diets was 813 μg/day, ranging from 402 to 1363 μg/day. In some cases daily intakes were around 10 times higher than the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) value (150 μg/day).

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Abstract  

Traditional medicinal seeds prescribed for specific treatment purposes, were purchased from local markets and analyzed by INAA. The samples were irradiated at Es-Salam research reactor, at a power of 5 MW for 6 h. The accuracy of the method was established by analyzing reference materials. Twenty elements were measured, with good accuracy and reproducibility. The concentration of elements determined, was found to vary depending on the seeds. The daily intake of essential and toxic elements was determined, and compared with the recommended values. The probable cumulative intake of toxic elements is well below the tolerance limits.

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Abstract  

This article explains the application of a few nuclear and non nuclearanalytical techniques to determine a number of toxic and essential trace elementsin human daily intakes. The diets are the food patterns of different populationof Iranian provinces with different food habits.In this article a comparisonhas been made for mineral micronutrient intaken by the different populationvia the pattern of nutrients in their daily diets. In the meantime resultingoutcome from different analytical techniques including instrumental and radiochemicalneutron activation analysis have been compared and discussed.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
H. Dang
,
H. Desai
,
S. Kayasth
,
D. Jaiswal
,
C. Wadhwani
, and
S. Somasundaram

Abstract  

The daily intakes of trace elements by infants showing optimal pattern of growth are used as the basis to estimate the requirements of Fe, Co and Se during infancy. Since milk is the only food and source of nutrition in the first few months of life, the requirements of these elements are calculated from their average concentrations in human milk and the volume of milk required to supply sufficient amount of energy for maintenance and healthy growth of infants. The concentrations of the three elements in human milk were determined, using the technique of neutron activation followed by radiochemical separation.

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Abstract  

In the present work, the concentration of the 14 elements Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Mn, Na, Rb, Sc Se and Zn have been determined by INAA in diets of four different groups: (a) 19 pre-school children, (b) 18 healthy adults, (c) 23 elderly people living in private institutions and (d) 19 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). The contents of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates were also analysed in the diets. The daily intakes of the elements analysed were compared to the recommended values set by RDA or WHO.

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