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In 2009 Hungarian Food Safety Office (HFSO) performed a countrywide representative dietary survey to obtain food consumption data for quantitative food safety risk assessment utilizable in the field of public health nutrition as well. The consumption of foodstuffs, daily energy- and nutrient intakes, nutritional habits and dietary supplement usage of Hungarian population was assessed. The complex system has included three-day dietary record and a food consumption frequency questionnaire. Some anthropometric parameters were also self-recorded. According to the body mass index, a considerable proportion of both the 31–60 years old males (69%) and females (46%) were overweight or obese. The energy intake of the Hungarian adult population is slightly exceeds the recommendation. The intake of proteins is satisfactory in general. The average intake of total fats is very high (36.1–38.9 energy percent), and the fatty acid composition — mostly the ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids — is unfavourable, but the fatty acid pattern regarding saturated- (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acid ratio shows favourable tendency. The proportion of complex carbohydrates within the intake of energy providing macronutrients is far lower than the optimal level, but it is a positive finding that added sugar intake is below the outmost recommendation. The average daily cholesterol intake is high (males: 469 mg, females: 335 mg), whilst the dietary fibre intake is lower than the recommended. The article provides data on alcohol, caffeine and fibre consumption, too.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: K. Szentmihályi, A. Blázovics, I. Kocsis, Edit Fehér, B. Lakatos, and Péter Vinkler

. 24 b2.626 Chetty, K. N., Conway, R., Harris, K. C, Dorsey, W. C, Hill, D., Chetty, S., Yerrapragada, R. & Jain, S. (1999): Dietary supplementation with oil

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Health . Singapore, p. 30. De Jong, N., Ocke, M., Branderhost, M. & Friele, R. (2003): Demographic and lifestyle characteristics of functional food consumers and dietary supplement users. Brit. J. Nutr

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: J. Pokorná, P. R. Venskutonis, V. Kraujalyte, P. Kraujalis, P. Dvořák, B. Tremlová, V. Kopřiva, and M. Ošťádalová

. P RIOR , R.L. , WU , X. , & S CHAICH , K. ( 2005 ): Standardized methods for the determination of antioxidant capacity and phenolics in foods and dietary supplements . J. Agric. Food Chem. , 53 , 4290 – 4302

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foods and dietary supplements. J. Agric. Fd Chem., 53, 4290–4302. Schauch K. Standardized methods for the determination of antioxidant capacity and phenolic in foods and dietary

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5281 5282 Delmonte, P., Perry, J. & Rader, J.I. (2006): Determination of isoflavones in dietary supplements containing soy, red clover and kudzu: Extraction

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46 83 95 Mir, Z., Rushfeldt, M.L., Mir, P.S., Paterson, L.J. & Weselake, R.J. (2000): Effect of dietary supplementation with either

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phenolic compounds in foods and dietary supplements. Analyt. Bioanalyt. Chem., 389, 47–61. Lin L.Z. Profling methods for the determination of phenolic compounds in foods and dietary

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and dietary supplements . J. Agr. Food Chem ., 55 , 8896 – 8907 . Z anfini , A. , C orbini , G. , LA R osa , C. & D reassi , E. ( 2010 ): Antioxidant activity of tomato lipophilic

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: Zs. Bodor, Cs. Benedek, T. Kaszab, J.-L. Zinia Zaukuu, I. Kertész, and Z. Kovacs

, S38 – S81 . P rior , R.L. , W u , X. & S chaich , K. ( 2005 ): Standardized methods for the determination of antioxidant capacity and phenolics in foods and dietary

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